Hyundai Forums banner

1 - 20 of 26 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi Everyone,

I have a few questions about EV mode and the battery charge gage. This is my first hybrid, so sorry if this is all common knowledge. I tried searching and didn't find much for the non-plug in hybrids. I've only had it for a week, about 200 miles, so obviously less than half a tank so far. Trips have mostly been about 7-10 miles, with a few 20-30 miles.

Admittedly, I'm getting reasonable MPG, 35-40 per trip, considering this is the first few miles on the car and it is still at or below 32°F. I'm trying to not overthink or outsmart the car, but right now it confuses me.

  1. The battery charge gage doesn't vary much. I've never seen it below 1/2 and it only goes a few bars above half, never to 3/4. I don't understand why it won't swing between 1/4 to 3/4. Is there a calibration period for it that I'm not through yet? It seems unwilling to use its battery
  2. When going from stopped at a light to driving, the EV mode doesn't stay on very long. I have tried being as gentle as possible with the throttle (10%-20%), but rarely make it past 20-25 MPH and only if I am moving slightly faster than idle. I understand that it will switch off if I accelerate moderately or aggressively, or maybe past 40 MPH, but it doesn't seem to stay only long enough.
  3. When coasting to a stop or taking my foot off the accelerator pedal momentarily due to traffic, it seems to always jump into EV mode within 1 second. This seems like too quick of a switch. I understand that when the navigation is running it has some sense of where turns and intersections are, but I don't normally have it on navigation and it ends up switching to EV when a car cuts in front of me (taking my foot off the accelerator momentarily), just to switch off when I need to accelerate to keep pace with traffic.

Thanks in advance for your insight & comments!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
92 Posts
Sounds like your hybrid is running just fine my dude. The gas to ev switch is near instantaneous anytime you hit the brakes, and your battery probably isn't charging up all the way because of your driving habits and routes youre taking. If it's flat land, there's no real inertia for it to charge back up to full. My commute is down a hill, and while I think it should charge a bit faster, I'm usually to full battery by the time I get to the bottom. Your trips are relatively short so mileage is gonna be a little less than highway driving. In 32° and less with a commute of 40 miles, I usually average 40mpg. As far as why it switches from ev to gas after a stop, that has to do with your driving habits. There's a thread on here that talks about learning to drive in a hybrid style. Some good reading. The best thing I've learned on there is how to accelerate to a point where the nose doesn't come up. Less height, more efficiency. The other thing is the hybrid doesn't like to take on too much of a load near or under half. I typically only see full electric takeoffs when I'm over ¾. If you really wanna see if your battery isn't charging over ¾, turn on your heater and let it idle. The engine will stay on to provide heat and simultaneously charge the hybrid battery. And if you wanna see it go under the, put it in sport and do some spirited driving, I guarantee you you'll see it go below that. But, it sounds like you're doing just fine

Sent from my Pixel 2 XL using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
559 Posts
I have a '16 so these comments may not be applicable to the '17 but I'm guessing they are.

How often are you above 40% power? If a lot that's why EV mode won't stay on. If you're consistently above 40% try switching Driving Mode from Eco to Norm (the center console, push it once and Eco will go out). I noticed zero difference in mileage and the car is more responsive. Yes, you have to do it each time you start the car.

When you look at the driving percentage in the center (to the left of the speedometer), Economy/Normal/Aggressive, what are your percentages? I reset mine at each fill-up and Aggressive is rarely above 2%. When my wife drives Aggressive is rarely below 35%. It seems like it records anything above 40% power as aggressive.

Watch the power gauge in the center of the console to see what is powering what when. That will help you learn to drive the hybrid way.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
141 Posts
I think the car is operating as designed.

When I put my PHEV in HEV mode, the gas engine comes on at about 20%. I don't like it, but that's the way it was designed to operate.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,000 Posts
From what I've seen, the battery gauge on the newer LF Sonata Hybrid works the same as on the YF (2011-2015 Sonata Hybrid; the two letters are Hyundai code for the older and newer chassis). Basically, to help make the battery last as long as possible, the software attempts to keep the battery from fully charging and discharging. The reason for this is that, as you get close to full or empty on a Lithium battery it generates quite a bit more heat and is also less efficient. So the hybrid software tries to keep the battery charged "in the middle," say between about 40 and 65%. As others have mentioned, there are times you'll see it go up further or get almost completely discharged; such as going up and down high hills and mountains or when the car is cold and just idling. Of course, hills/mountains are a secondary reason for not fully charging/discharging the battery -- going up a mountain the car will use the electric motor to aid the ICE (Internal Combustion Engine), to give you more power going up steep grades. And, coming down the mountain, since often you need to brake going down to keep the car from going too fast, having the battery lower allows you to reclaim more of that energy while coasting/braking.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Thanks everyone. Like I said, the MPG is on par, so I'm not truly complaining, it's just the details that made me wonder. Still, the fact that the battery never gets more than 5/8ths is odd and doesn't fit with what others have reported. If the battery really wanted to be charged more than 5/8, then why does it shut down the engine instead of keeping in on to charge up to 3/4? I just don't understand why there is seemingly such a large range, only for it to operate in a narrow band. Maybe time will tell.

I basically only have the power over 40% when needed for an on-ramp and I have no complaints about the ability of this car to get up and go, even in ECO mode. In the default ECO drive mode, there doesn't seem to be much of a throttle response 0-20%, but there is plenty of room between 20-40%. I'll try more with the NORMAL drive mode to see if that changes anything.

It seems odd that you would specifically designate 0-40% as an ECO range, yet reliably have the engine kick on at 20%, which is usually what I have seen. I would think that indicating to the driver that you are in the ECO zone would correlate with more EV time.

If I truly cared about pure EV mode, or thought my wife cared at all, we would have gotten the PHEV or an EV. So sorry if this seems like a rant. Just trying to wrap my head around all of this. Thanks again!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
559 Posts
Yeah, that whole "Aggressive" thing is less than useful on the '16. If I keep it under 40% for an entire tank my Aggressive driving is 0%. I think "aggressive" has a different meaning with Hyundai than by parents, police or insurance companies.

Except in the winter where I let the car idle to warm up mine is usually below 5/8ths. As one person obliquely noted, if the battery is fully charged and you are going down a long hill with braking, the power generated by regenerative braking has nowhere to go. That means the car has to fall back on the "plain old" brakes which it actually usually uses only at very low speeds.

I read that the Ioniq uses a terrain map and the GPS to learn about upcoming hills. If it sees one coming up it will charge the battery more fully so it can use more of the battery to get up the hill.

If you think the battery is getting too low you can switch the car into Sport mode. That seems to change the programming on the battery controller and you can get it up to 100% in just a few miles. Be aware of the "going down hills" thing, though. But if you know you have a long incline coming up, go ahead and "play Ioniq" to build up the charge right before you start up the hill and see if it helps.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
141 Posts
I basically only have the power over 40% when needed for an on-ramp and I have no complaints about the ability of this car to get up and go, even in ECO mode. In the default ECO drive mode, there doesn't seem to be much of a throttle response 0-20%, but there is plenty of room between 20-40%. I'll try more with the NORMAL drive mode to see if that changes anything.
I think you will see a big difference. I find it a bit too touchy for my liking and only use it when going up steep hills.

t seems odd that you would specifically designate 0-40% as an ECO range, yet reliably have the engine kick on at 20%, which is usually what I have seen. I would think that indicating to the driver that you are in the ECO zone would correlate with more EV time.
I'm very, very disappointed in Hyundai's design. This issue plus the lack of a PTC heater in the PHEV model makes me wonder if Hyundai engineers are brain dead.

If I had known that Honda was coming out with a PHEV, I wouldn't have got the Sonata. The sales of the Honda Clarity are kicking Hyundai's and Kia's fanny.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,735 Posts
Unless you have some big large hills, and gently tap the brakes to just charge when going down that hill, you won't go much above 3/4 on the battery in normal driving. I can go to full charge on some of the big hills by me. If you want to charge it fully, press the "performance" button three times and go to Performance mode. The battery is suppose to stay almost fully charged as that kicks in the E motor when you accelerate, but there goes mileage.

I have a '16 Ultimate and in the warm weather get 44-47 mpg in Eco. If you stay in the 40% accelerate range, that gauge is like the old vacuum gauges for gas mileage. You'll be amazed how may times people will zoom past you at stop lights, and then you catch up with that car two lights down the road.

If you really need to get going from a ramp, press that console button and turn off Eco.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,735 Posts
You'll see a big difference in "normal" mode when driving. I am not sure if you will get the same mileage. Sort of like my old Subaru, turn off the air, then floor it to pass or get going at the on-ramp, then air back on.

I always just go to 40%, you'll accelerate nice and still get 44+ mpg. The EV mode is just for idle, down hill and slight declines. I'm on the Parkway doing 70 mph and on slight declines the EV will kick in for a bit here and there. When you fill up and DTE is 630 miles.. . I like that.

Your air is attached somehow to the electric motor, so in the summer the engine will stop, but the air continues. But in cold weather, the only way to get heat is run the engine. Sitting at a long light at 30 degrees, your engine will start just to make heat.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,000 Posts
Thanks everyone. Like I said, the MPG is on par, so I'm not truly complaining, it's just the details that made me wonder. Still, the fact that the battery never gets more than 5/8ths is odd and doesn't fit with what others have reported. If the battery really wanted to be charged more than 5/8, then why does it shut down the engine instead of keeping in on to charge up to 3/4? I just don't understand why there is seemingly such a large range, only for it to operate in a narrow band. Maybe time will tell.

I basically only have the power over 40% when needed for an on-ramp and I have no complaints about the ability of this car to get up and go, even in ECO mode. In the default ECO drive mode, there doesn't seem to be much of a throttle response 0-20%, but there is plenty of room between 20-40%. I'll try more with the NORMAL drive mode to see if that changes anything.

It seems odd that you would specifically designate 0-40% as an ECO range, yet reliably have the engine kick on at 20%, which is usually what I have seen. I would think that indicating to the driver that you are in the ECO zone would correlate with more EV time.

If I truly cared about pure EV mode, or thought my wife cared at all, we would have gotten the PHEV or an EV. So sorry if this seems like a rant. Just trying to wrap my head around all of this. Thanks again!
From what I've seen, most of the hybrid manufacturers try to routinely use only about 30% of the battery -- this is done to maximize the battery life. What I do find different on the Hyundai, say as compared to the Ford Hybrids, is that Hyundai appears to show something close to the full actual range of the hybrid battery (roughly from 0 to 100%) and the Ford Hybrid the gauge only shows from about 30 to 65%, to make it appear more of the battery is being used. Of course, that leads to the issue on the Ford that if you fill the battery indicator, at least without an OBD2 scanner, you have no idea if your battery is just two-thirds full, three-quarters full, or 100% full.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
92 Posts
From what I've seen, most of the hybrid manufacturers try to routinely use only about 30% of the battery -- this is done to maximize the battery life. What I do find different on the Hyundai, say as compared to the Ford Hybrids, is that Hyundai appears to show something close to the full actual range of the hybrid battery (roughly from 0 to 100%) and the Ford Hybrid the gauge only shows from about 30 to 65%, to make it appear more of the battery is being used. Of course, that leads to the issue on the Ford that if you fill the battery indicator, at least without an OBD2 scanner, you have no idea if your battery is just two-thirds full, three-quarters full, or 100% full.
Are you saying Hyundai let's the hybrid battery completely charge and discharge full cycles? Most manufacturers leave a buffer zone on each side of the spectrum of at least 20% that isn't counted to maintain the longevity of the battery

Sent from my Pixel 2 XL using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,000 Posts
Are you saying Hyundai let's the hybrid battery completely charge and discharge full cycles? Most manufacturers leave a buffer zone on each side of the spectrum of at least 20% that isn't counted to maintain the longevity of the battery

Sent from my Pixel 2 XL using Tapatalk
I really don't know. What I was trying to say is that Hyundai shows the full amount of the battery in the gauge that it allows to be used -- even though it in normal use will only really use about half or so of what the gauge shows. By contrast, while Ford may limit the battery so the hybrid system can't use the top and bottom 20%, they still restrict the amount the gauge shows from something like 40-65% or so. I know the Ford because I've read posts by hybrid owners who uses a scanner on the ODB2 port to watch the battery charge -- I've not seen anything as detailed on the Sonata Hybrid.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
175 Posts
I couldn't find any hybrid functionality on OBDII when I looked. Mine is of bluetooth variety, so maybe it's a matter of choosing the right app?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,000 Posts
I couldn't find any hybrid functionality on OBDII when I looked. Mine is of bluetooth variety, so maybe it's a matter of choosing the right app?
The issue with trying to find things like hybrid settings on an OBDII port is that they are typically manufacturer specific, so a generic app/scanner won't display the sensors you need. I believe some here have used Advanced LT for Hyundai on Android as a plug in for Torque Pro, though again, I don't believe it has all the Hybrid sensors. By contrast, apparently the ForScan app has all the codes to read the sensors/PIDs needed to for the hybrid sensors.

My recollection is that much of what we know of the battery usage and hybrid operation was posted by a Hyundai tech that used to be active on these forums, but I don't believe he's been posting for at least three years.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
Thanks again everyone. Coincidentally, I have now seen the battery gage open up. It has occasionally dipped below 1/2 and I've seen it at 3/4 a few times now; no change in driving style. It clearly just wanted me to mention it on the internet in order feel like an idiot.

I've started switching to the Normal drive mode upon start-up and it certainly feels better. It doesn't seem to affect the switch between EV mode much, for whatever my observation is worth. When I started researching cars, I religiously viewed reviews by Alex on Autos on Youtube. He did one of the 2016 HSH. His description of the drive train helped make sense of it, as did MButkus' account. Without a torque converter, it uses the e-motor to get the car rolling then engages the engine, thus leaving the EV mode for idling, parking lots, creeping back to my house in the subdivision.

Again, no regrets, just some detailed curiosities.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
475 Posts
Thanks again everyone. Coincidentally, I have now seen the battery gage open up. It has occasionally dipped below 1/2 and I've seen it at 3/4 a few times now; no change in driving style. It clearly just wanted me to mention it on the internet in order feel like an idiot.

I've started switching to the Normal drive mode upon start-up and it certainly feels better. It doesn't seem to affect the switch between EV mode much, for whatever my observation is worth. When I started researching cars, I religiously viewed reviews by Alex on Autos on Youtube. He did one of the 2016 HSH. His description of the drive train helped make sense of it, as did MButkus' account. Without a torque converter, it uses the e-motor to get the car rolling then engages the engine, thus leaving the EV mode for idling, parking lots, creeping back to my house in the subdivision.

Again, no regrets, just some detailed curiosities.
Try sport mode and it will fully charge the EV battery. In gernal on eco or black mode, it will not go over 2/3 and not under 1/3. 1/4 and 3/4 seem to be absolute maximums there.

The EV mode can be used for much more than idle and creeping around. On my commute to work from home which is 15 miles and to a slightly lower elevation with traffic on the freeway (speeds under 50 mpg) and can keep it in EV mode for a very long time. This morning my MPG on that trip was 89 :). Typically on the way back home after work on the same route I will get about 50 MPG.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
Try sport mode and it will fully charge the EV battery. In gernal on eco or black mode, it will not go over 2/3 and not under 1/3. 1/4 and 3/4 seem to be absolute maximums there.

The EV mode can be used for much more than idle and creeping around. On my commute to work from home which is 15 miles and to a slightly lower elevation with traffic on the freeway (speeds under 50 mpg) and can keep it in EV mode for a very long time. This morning my MPG on that trip was 89 :). Typically on the way back home after work on the same route I will get about 50 MPG.
Good point. I have noticed EV kick on during freeway runs, the few that I've had.

Interesting point about Sport mode. Do you use Sport mode for your commute?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
475 Posts
Good point. I have noticed EV kick on during freeway runs, the few that I've had.

Interesting point about Sport mode. Do you use Sport mode for your commute?
No I do not use sport mode at all really. ECO mode only. And, to get the MPG I do my typical rating % are: 0% aggressive, 3% normal, 97% eco.

And, I still arrive at work or home the same time my colleague does (who lives near me and works in my department) that drives Infinity G37 and gets 18 to 19 MPG (and needs premium fuel)...
 
1 - 20 of 26 Posts
Top