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Hello everyone, I recently purchased a 2022 Tucson, SEL trim with convenience package. I think it's a great SUV, my family and I are enjoying the vehicle so far. I'm hoping someone can help with the following statement in the vehicle manual:

"Your new vehicle is designed to use only unleaded fuel having an octane number ((R+M)/2) of 91 (Research Octane Number 95) or higher."

This is for the base engine, a naturally aspirated inline 4 cylinder (Smartstream G 2.5 GDI). I was more than surprised to see this... Hyundai dealers are advertising this trim as using regular gasoline, as does fueleconomy.gov. This statement in the manual goes beyond the more typical "premium gasoline is recommended", as it implies premium gasoline is required. I called the dealer who told me premium was recommended only, not required, and they filled the vehicle with regular the day I purchased the vehicle. But the vehicle manual should hold the "truth". My plan is to go ahead and use premium for now - can anyone tell me if this statement is indeed correct? Should I be using premium gasoline? The base Sonata has the same engine with regular gasoline only in vehicle manual, though engine may be tuned differently?
 

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Interesting. We just purchased the Hybrid version of the same trim level (SEL Convenience). It has the 1.6 Turbo paired up. We love it!

Our manual says: Unleaded Your new vehicle is designed to use only unleaded fuel having an octane number((R+M)/2) of 87 (Research Octane Number 91) or higher. (Do not use methanol blended fuels)

I will say that the manual is confusing....

a few sentences later: "Do not use gasohol containing more than 10% ethanol ..."

and only a few sentences later still: "HYUNDAI recommends that customers do not use fuel with an ethanol content exceeding 15 percent. "

I've found the manual to often have so many duplicative statements - which is one thing when they say the same thing. But when they contradict each other...

They later qual that TOP TIER Detergent Gasoline is acceptable so that answered what I was looking for (whether I can use Costco Gas, which I've come to learn their higher octane has no ethanol).
 

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I would use premium fuel

Different engines have different requirements....

About time Hyundai be honest with 'fuel recommendations' for some of their engines
 
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Hello everyone, I recently purchased a 2022 Tucson, SEL trim with convenience package. I think it's a great SUV, my family and I are enjoying the vehicle so far. I'm hoping someone can help with the following statement in the vehicle manual:

"Your new vehicle is designed to use only unleaded fuel having an octane number ((R+M)/2) of 91 (Research Octane Number 95) or higher."

This is for the base engine, a naturally aspirated inline 4 cylinder (Smartstream G 2.5 GDI). I was more than surprised to see this... Hyundai dealers are advertising this trim as using regular gasoline, as does fueleconomy.gov. This statement in the manual goes beyond the more typical "premium gasoline is recommended", as it implies premium gasoline is required. I called the dealer who told me premium was recommended only, not required, and they filled the vehicle with regular the day I purchased the vehicle. But the vehicle manual should hold the "truth". My plan is to go ahead and use premium for now - can anyone tell me if this statement is indeed correct? Should I be using premium gasoline? The base Sonata has the same engine with regular gasoline only in vehicle manual, though engine may be tuned differently?
I just bought 22 Tucson se...once the tank they filled me ip on was empty.. i filled up 87 like i would assume. acouole of hours later started realizing I was having low speed roughly from takeoff to about 30-40 mph pulsations… Almost like a tug-of-war feel… Totally disgusted I drove right over to Hyundai and said hey what's going on with my brand new vehicle he ran a diagnostic came back all green lights. I got home grab a cuppa coffee and decide let me read the book… And lo and behold what is the first or second page say on the owners manual… 91 octane or higher is required for this vehicle..... LOW AND BEHOLD🤔🙄... soooo as soon as i burn off this tank.. HOPEFULLY.. prob fixed. 2 b continued...PS GREAT Vehicle… We love it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
lso
I just bought 22 Tucson se...once the tank they filled me ip on was empty.. i filled up 87 like i would assume. acouole of hours later started realizing I was having low speed roughly from takeoff to about 30-40 mph pulsations… Almost like a tug-of-war feel… Totally disgusted I drove right over to Hyundai and said hey what's going on with my brand new vehicle he ran a diagnostic came back all green lights. I got home grab a cuppa coffee and decide let me read the book… And lo and behold what is the first or second page say on the owners manual… 91 octane or higher is required for this vehicle..... LOW AND BEHOLD🤔🙄... soooo as soon as i burn off this tank.. HOPEFULLY.. prob fixed. 2 b continued...PS GREAT Vehicle… We love it.
I a
I just bought 22 Tucson se...once the tank they filled me ip on was empty.. i filled up 87 like i would assume. acouole of hours later started realizing I was having low speed roughly from takeoff to about 30-40 mph pulsations… Almost like a tug-of-war feel… Totally disgusted I drove right over to Hyundai and said hey what's going on with my brand new vehicle he ran a diagnostic came back all green lights. I got home grab a cuppa coffee and decide let me read the book… And lo and behold what is the first or second page say on the owners manual… 91 octane or higher is required for this vehicle..... LOW AND BEHOLD🤔🙄... soooo as soon as i burn off this tank.. HOPEFULLY.. prob fixed. 2 b continued...PS GREAT Vehicle… We love it.
I had the exact
I just bought 22 Tucson se...once the tank they filled me ip on was empty.. i filled up 87 like i would assume. acouole of hours later started realizing I was having low speed roughly from takeoff to about 30-40 mph pulsations… Almost like a tug-of-war feel… Totally disgusted I drove right over to Hyundai and said hey what's going on with my brand new vehicle he ran a diagnostic came back all green lights. I got home grab a cuppa coffee and decide let me read the book… And lo and behold what is the first or second page say on the owners manual… 91 octane or higher is required for this vehicle..... LOW AND BEHOLD🤔🙄... soooo as soon as i burn off this tank.. HOPEFULLY.. prob fixed. 2 b continued...PS GREAT Vehicle… We love it.
I had the same thing happen with 93 in the tank... The service center could not detect anything wrong with the vehicle, and suggested the gasoline "may have separated" as it maybe is not used as much as 87 in the area. Not sure what to think, but I've been putting 89 or 93 since, and have not had a problem (over 1,000 miles).
 

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I a

I had the exact

I had the same thing happen with 93 in the tank... The service center could not detect anything wrong with the vehicle, and suggested the gasoline "may have separated" as it maybe is not used as much as 87 in the area. Not sure what to think, but I've been putting 89 or 93 since, and have not had a problem (over 1,000 miles).
I sure hope so… Thank you for the response and helps out a lot psychologically😂🤔👌
 

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I have a 2022 hyundai tucson limited hybrid and have ran several tanks of 87 octane through my engine with no issues.
the hybrid owners manual specifically states, use gasoline with r+m/2 rating of 87 or 91 ron equivalent.
all gasoline pumps in the USA state the r+m/2 octane rating fot each grade of gasoline,see picture of pump below.
To determine your vehicle's octane requirement, look at the manufacturer's recommendation in your owner's manual. Most auto manufacturers recommend 87 octane gasoline, as measured by the (R + M) / 2 method on a test engine under defined operating conditions. As a rule of thumb, the recommended octane rating can be determined by subtracting four (4) from the recommended RON number. A vehicle that calls for "91 RON" should use 87 octane gasoline (as measured by the (R + M) / 2 method).
it is not correct to say that the 2022 hyundai tucson hybrid requires premium gasoline, it requires gasoline with a minimum R+M/2 of 87 which is the equivalent of 91Ron. a gasoline that would be designated as premium at the pump would have an r+m/2 of 91 to 93 or a Ron of 95 to 97
Americans waste $2.1 billion on premium fuel, AAA says

JOEL STOCKSDALE

Sep 20th 2016 at 7:45AM
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In a study that could indicate a need to change how we name fuels, the American Automobile Association ( AAA) discovered that using premium fuel (91-93 octane) in a car that only requires regular (87 octane) does absolutely nothing. AAA's experiment looked at whether cars requiring just regular fuel would have an effect on power, fuel economy, and emissions. To do this, they used 2016 models of a V8 Toyota Tundra, V6 Dodge Charger, and 2.0-liter Mazda 3. Each car was put through the EPA's city, highway and aggressive driving loops on a chassis dyno, with only the fuel as a variable. The testers also did horsepower measurements on the dyno.

In the end, every aspect remained virtually the same. There were minute changes for some of the vehicles, but they weren't enough to be noticeable. And for fuel economy, the differences wouldn't even come close to the 23-percent increase in fuel cost AAA estimated for premium. AAA director of automotive engineering Greg Brannon said that the cars did recognize and compensate for the different octane fuels. AAA measured ignition timing in each vehicle with each type of fuel, and there was a noticeable change in timing when premium fuel was used. So it was surprising to the testers that none of the vehicles adjusted timing in such a way that would improve at least one performance aspect. In essence, Americans waste $2.1 billion every single year on premium gas that their cars don't need, AAA says.

There is one minor caveat to this test though. The only thing tested here was the effect of octane on vehicle performance. While spending more on premium won't get you any benefits, there are differences in fuels, but the differences come from fuel quality, not octane. In a test done by AAA earlier this year, it was discovered that fuel that meets TOP TIER standards for fuel detergents and additives are much better for engines. The test revealed that fuel that only meets government requirements for additives left 19 percent more deposits over 4,000 miles compared with the TOP TIER fuel. If you're interested in which brands sell TOP TIER fuel, you can find the list here. So the takeaway here is buy the fuel the manufacturer recommends, and buy it from a TOP TIER brand. This way you'll save money and keep your car healthy.


 
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