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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello fellow members.

I have a question which Im sure will not be a quick answer. In Australia we do not get the GDI engine in our accents however our engines do use a timing chain. Now I have looked through the owners manual and I cannot see anything about it needing adjusting or replacing anytime soon and based on the 15,000 km service schedule I would assume some maintenance would need to be performed around 105,000 kms. I would like some input on what should be done for this.

The 90,000 km service mentions that the valve clearance should be checked and adjusted which confuses me as they are pushed down from lobes of the cams, which are turned by the timing chain. Does this mean the timing chain doesn't need replacing and by adjusting the valves will fix/reduce any issues caused by the stretching of the chain. Before anyone asks about talking to the dealer I have tried and they say, "Bring it to us and we will make sure its done properly" Of course they forget to mention the massive bill that comes along with it.

I haven't spoken with any local mechanics as of yet, I'm not up to that stage yet. Just thought that I would get some input first.
 

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Depends on the type of chain. On the 2010-2011 Genesis Coupe there are issues with the chain stretching and they changed designs for anything after that. About the only way to tell is to actually look at it and see if it is stretched. If the chain is a full three link wide it is probably good. The original Genesis Coupe one is 2 links-3 links, the replacement is all 3 links.

The valves are adjusted by exchanging the buckets for one that would correct the clearance.. PITA and I hope it is not a frequent thing to do as the cams would need to come out and the buckets are about $16 ea US.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Great sounds like it may even be worth rebuilding the head if you have to take the cams out for that.
 

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Our GDI engines have variable cam timing that is controlled by the computer. I am sure that it compensates for the chain stretch. I do not know if your engines have the same thing.
 

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Yes the Gen Coupe has the both intake and exhaust cams controlled by the ECU. If the chainstretch then the timing is sloppy. No different than a 1972 GM motor with plastic timing gears. The ECU cannot make up for slop except to over compensate then it needs to under compensate and then back to over....

FWIW both the cam and oil pump chains for the 2010-11 2L have been replaced by a different part number. More than likely a 3 wide link chain vs the 2 wide/3 wide chain.
 

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Hydraulic tensioner I believe is designed to try and compensate for some stretch; but eventually Teflon guides and tensioner wear enough that chain rattle ,hashing may eventually turn up if enough miles logged.

Funny GM was mentioned, had to change a chain on a GM 2.4 overhead valve engine once; major PIA.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Well thank you all for the info. I would just like to know whats needing to be done before I go into the dealership so they cant try to bull**** me into doing things that I don't need to pay for as they don't like to make a dent in their profit margins.
 

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Being a chain it will be lubed so the timing cover will have a gasket. Not quite as simple as pulling the covers off and looking at the belt.

To really inspect them you would need to pull the valve cover and the front timing cover off. This would also mean the belts and crank pulley off too.
 

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Back in the day a good way to tell if the timing chain was stretched was with a timing light.

On a hot motor you would rev the motor up and then let the throttle snap shut. While watching the timing mark as it went into retard and if it passed the place it would be when at idle, then back forward to the where it should be at idle, the chain was loose.
 

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With my experience, it is usually the tensioners and plastic/rubber guides that wear out and can cause slippage or over-stretch of the chain, which can sometimes lead to engine failure.

I had a plastic chain guide fail in a Saturn sedan, but the engine survived. I also replaced an upper tensioner for a nissan sentra, which was relatively easy, and were considered a maintenance part to be replaced at 200k+ miles. That sentra has 230k+miles and the new tensioner helped a lot with the cars performance.
 
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