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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I ran into a snag cleaning the brakes on my mom's 2018 E limited. I cleaned the fronts and put them back together, then did the passenger side rear. By cleaned I mean caliper off, bracket off, clips out, pins out, everything brass wire brushed & hosed with brakleen, wiped clean, relubed and put back. However, on the final corner ( driver's side rear) the parking brake level and cable is giving me difficulty not encountered on the other side. The manual shows that you pull the parking brake lever arm down to unhook the cable by turning a wrench on the nut pushing the lever arm down towards the rear of the car. When the lever arm rotates down you can then pull up on the cable to unhook it and proceed with dismantling the rest of the brake. That works fine on the passenger side, but on the driver's side the nut simply loosened up and spun on the bolt. The lever is not rotating down to give slack on the cable. Process stopped right there. So how do you get the driver's side E-brake cable off the hook, and how do you get it back on when reassembling everything? I tried to pry the lever arm down with a big screwdriver but I can't move it far enough to release the cable.

Another thing I want to ask about: taking the driver's side front brakes apart I saw that the piston was unevenly extended, like one side is out further than the "side" 180 degrees opposite. Also I could see a groove, like for a square cut gasket but with no gasket in it, exposed on the side of the piston. Wouldn't this mean that the brake hydraulic system is no longer sealed? I pushed the piston back into the caliper evenly with a brake piston compressor and block of wood. The position of the passenger side piston was normal looking. Brake fluid level is down a little over a centimeter from max fill line - car has only 8K miles.
 

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I wish Hyundai copied Toyota for rear disc brakes instead of GM, Toyota and even Chrysler have a combination drum rotor, using the drum for parking brakes with shoes and and the simple caliper like the fronts that is inherently self adjusting.

With the GM and Hyundai copy, have to work the parking brake to adjust the brakes, pulls those levers forward and if excessive, kind of like a ratchet wrench that clicks to further tighten the disc brake gap. Road salt takes their toll on the brakes, and replacement cost is next to outrageous.

If you want to remove the caliper have two tasks, the parking brake cable and the brake fluid hose. Normally do not have problems removing the cable with the caliper in your hand, but nasty when mounted, can only pull that lever so far forward.

Hyundai is kind of a pain to adjust the parking brake, you do have to constantly work the hand brake lever to take up the play, but if that is enough, have to remove the entire center console to get at that adjusting nut. Kia, uses the same brakes, on my kids car, hers has a back panel on her console to get at that nut.

I used plenty of silicone grease on the caliper pins, has to easily self center. Those brake pad clips on the pad bracket can trap road salt, expand and lock the pads, so they don't return when the brake pedal is released. Jammed on the rotor burning it up. Clean those and coat underneath with anti-seize, also on those clips where the ends of the pads fit in.

My discs on my 2017 Limited had the backing plates painted, poor, should be plated, sanded that off with plenty of anti-seize so they can slide easier in and out. Is such a thing as black brake grease, crap is a better name for.

Did my brakes on day two after buying this thing, painted the entire rear caliper with anti-seize to keep the road salt off. Since the rotor is cast iron, also anti-seize the hub where the wheel fits on, if you don't will never get the wheel off.

Could reason to move down south if you don't mind water shortages or hurricanes, can't win.
 

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Guess my first question is to why anyone would remove all the brake components on a car with only 8000 miles? Certainly not necessary to say the least.
As far as the piston, have never seen one uneven but a picture would be best.
Guess the answer to the e brake cable is answered above.
 

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If the piston is not centered it most certainly bound in the bore. No fluid leak means no seal leak.
Ford Taurus rear disc it was easy to take the ebrake cable spring off but near impossible to get back on. But AutoZone had rema calipers with lifetime warranty at al the stores for the cheap that came with the spring on.
 

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On all vehicle purchases on day 2 remove the drum, rotors, shoes or pads and lubricate with anti-seize on contact points, silicone for the caliper pins, the hubs where the wheel fits on, if you don't with road also, drums or rotors are not plated, will never get them off. Silicone gets on all lamp sockets, with that rubber gasket, bare, bakes on, never get those off.

Son brought over is 9 year old Dodge Nitro with 60K miles on it, all day Saturday just did the rears, disc brakes for service. drums for parking. Dodge set the parking brakes too tight, could not remove the calipers first, different than my Supra with parking drum brakes, adjust the cables. This thing used the shoe adjustment star like you find on a 41 Chevy, that had to be loosened before we could pull the rotor off.

But the rotor was not the only problem, his Nitro came with decent tires, any new vehicle I purchased had crap tires that had to be replaced before 20K miles. those wheels were rusted on solid, were never removed. Lot of wire brushing, PB Blaster to get them off.

Youtube shows those pad clips, other guys just snapped new ones in first, rust under those clips with bumps, had to file those off flat first, or the pads had to be pounded in, have to insert the pads with finger pressure or will stick to the rotors. Used anti-seize on both sides of those clip, Hyundai is the same. Needed a puller for the caliper pins. Old pads had to be knocked out with a hammer were frozen in, surprised this SUV still stopped.

Had to do my 88 Supra brakes three years ago, used anti-seize and silicone when new, was real easy to take everything apart. Did the same with my then new 2017 Limited wife and I do a lot of downshifting, brakes are still like new now.

Came back Sunday for the fronts, anothere
 
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