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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I put in a tank of Premium fuel, put it in sport mode and got some exciting results. 2.0T of course. I don't know if it's just placebo effect but this car is very fast with premium.
 

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After having mine now for a month, that is all I use 92-93 octane now it usually takes about 3-4 tanks for the ECU to adjust and again my choice of higher octane.
 

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I put in a tank of Premium fuel, put it in sport mode and got some exciting results. 2.0T of course. I don't know if it's just placebo effect but this car is very fast with premium.
not sure what kind of results You have? yes the 2.0T is quick I should no i own a 2014 :smile: i will fill up on Shells V-Power for its cleaning properties every 3-4 tankfull to keep the fuel system clean. all other fill ups its on shells top tier 87 octane. other than that no need to always run premuim fuel.
 

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I put in a tank of Premium fuel, put it in sport mode and got some exciting results. 2.0T of course. I don't know if it's just placebo effect but this car is very fast with premium.
After having mine now for a month, that is all I use 92-93 octane now it usually takes about 3-4 tanks for the ECU to adjust and again my choice of higher octane.
You may want to read this.

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/04/11/smarter-living/premium-gas-worth-it-octane-summer-ethanol.html

Putting Premium Gas in an Engine That Requires Regular? Stop It Now
Only 18 percent of new cars require premium. The owners of the other 82 percent waste about $2 billion a year using a gas that provides no benefit.


Think you are treating your car with kindness? You may just be guzzling away your money.CreditCreditBryan Anselm for The New York Times

By Norman Mayersohn
April 11, 2019

Personal finance coaches say that one path to helping balance your budget could be as simple as giving up your daily latte macchiato. The little things help. Like not splurging on what your car drinks.

Premium-grade gasoline is the most expensive gas you can usually buy, costing about 50 cents a gallon more than regular. Because only about 18 percent of new cars sold in the United States need it, there is no advantage in performance, fuel economy or emissions control for the other 82 percent to use high octane.

It’s no small matter. AAA estimates that drivers, who may think they are giving a gift to their beloved cars, waste more than $2 billion a year buying more octane than their vehicles require. Gift wrap nicer floor mats instead.

Gasoline is a lot like wine: A higher price does not assure greater satisfaction. The basic guidance, as always, is to follow the automaker’s fuel requirement in the owner’s manual, although it may waffle, saying that high-octane fuel is recommended (but not required), leaving the decision to the driver.

Octane explained

Still, if the car requires premium, that’s what you should buy to keep the engine in peak tune. The octane rating posted on the pump is a measure of the fuel’s resistance to detonation — combustion gone rogue inside the cylinders. In cars from 1980 and earlier, the condition could be heard as pinging or knocking — the sound of stones rattling in a tin can.

Recently, the quest by automakers for increased efficiency and power has resulted in engines with higher internal operating pressures, accomplished by raising the compression ratio, adding a turbocharger, supercharger or both.

Under those conditions, the formulation of premium gasoline with an octane rating of 91 or more is needed to assure that combustion in the cylinders is kept under control. The higher the octane, the greater its ability to prevent the unruly type of combustion engineers call detonation. The goal is to ignite the fuel mixture solely with the spark plug, rather than from the heat in the cylinder, to prevent detonation, which can seriously damage high-performance engines.

An engine not as highly stressed that is designed to burn 87-octane gas doesn’t run much risk of detonation, so it gains no benefit from using premium. In those cars, the five or more extra dollars spent on premium for each tankful is simply wasted, the equivalent of feeding Zabar’s pumpernickel to the Central Park pigeons.

“If it doesn’t say ‘required,’ it’s fine to go with the lower grade,” said Jason Kavanagh, senior vehicle test engineer at Edmunds.com, the car-shopping website. But, he added, you should test the economics for yourself.

One comforting note: Even when premium is required, using a tankful of lower-octane gas in a pinch is unlikely to do mechanical damage because of a bit of electronic wizardry called a knock sensor, which was introduced in the 1980s as part of computerized emissions control systems. Performance will suffer as the system compensates for the reduced octane, however.

A list of cars, from 2012-18, that require premium gas is online at the Edmunds website. For 2018 models, the 18 percent that require premium has held relatively steady over the years. The number of cars for which premium is recommended was 16 percent, a figure that has steadily grown over the last decade because of higher compression ratios, and more turbochargers and superchargers.

Say goodbye to winter gas

Another factor in pricing that motorists will soon encounter is the switch to summer gasoline blends. Yes, gasoline is seasonal, just like your wardrobe. And just like the weather across the United States, the timing of the switch and the fuel’s chemical makeup will vary.

The basic idea is that the summer gasoline formulations, which arrive as early as this month — but must be in place by June 1 in most areas — are formulated to reduce volatility. This measure of how readily it evaporates (and contributes to ground-level smog) is expressed by the gasoline’s Reid vapor pressure. Winter blends, conversely, need to evaporate more easily for quicker starting in cold weather; they return after Sept. 15.

There’s really no way for drivers to avoid the extra cost of summer gas — a dime or more per gallon, depending on the location — which is a result of the ingredients in the blend and the need to shut down refineries for the changeover. The summer chemistry does have a slightly higher energy content, so you may see a small improvement in fuel economy.

Higher ethanol levels

There is another wrinkle you’ll want to be aware of this year.

The limit of ethanol content in summer gasoline blends has long been capped at 10 percent — the typical level in most gas sold in the United States, known as E10 — because of ethanol’s relatively higher volatility. The E.P.A. is proposing to lift the ban on higher concentrations in summer gasoline, allowing the ethanol level to rise to 15 percent, or E15.

That means motorists will have to read the signs on the gas pump more closely.

Here’s why: The E.P.A. approves E15 for use only in light-duty vehicles of 2001 model year and newer. E15 is not approved by the agency for use in pre-2001 vehicles or motorcycles, boats, lawn mowers and off-road small engines.

More important, while 93 percent of 2019 model vehicles (by sales-weighted volume) are approved for E15 use, according to the Renewable Fuels Association, some automakers explicitly do not want you to fill up with it. New vehicles from Mazda, Mercedes-Benz, Mitsubishi, Volvo and some from BMW and Subaru, are not approved for E15 by their makers. Vehicles made by Fiat Chrysler, Hyundai, Kia and Volkswagen from model years before 2019 may also not be approved for E15, so you’ll have to dig out that owner’s manual again.

The warranty implications vary by manufacturer; using E15 may void the warranty for the engine. As always, it’s smart to be aware of what you’re putting into the tank. And there’s some chance that E15 may not arrive at your gas station this summer in any case, as ethanol refineries have been out of action as a result of flooding in the Midwest.

Smarter Driving is a new series all about how to buy, own, drive and maintain your car better. Have something you’d like us to cover? Reach out to Smarter Driving’s editor, James Schembari, at [email protected].
 

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Premium fuel issues have been discussed in all car forums for years and proven not to improve performance. Using high octane gas will do nothing but lighten your wallet. -- PERIOD
The 2.0T turbo was designed for an economy and some increase in power IT'S not a high-performance engine
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I have read all this before and understand the 2.0t is rated for regular but I decided to try a tank of premium anyway. In the Mazda CX-9 turbos they rate the hp at different numbers for premium and regular. Low octane will cause turbo engines to set off the knock sensor and kill horsepower. Just an experiment. I was just curious for myself and if anybody else has tried and what they felt.
 

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Again as Kennyr44 stated, I have read all the back and forth articles and overall running 92-93 is my choice and minimal in cost to me. Thus soon having a tune and modified intake keeping the factory cold intake design.
 

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I put in a tank of Premium fuel, put it in sport mode and got some exciting results. 2.0T of course. I don't know if it's just placebo effect but this car is very fast with premium.
I have read all this before and understand the 2.0t is rated for regular but I decided to try a tank of premium anyway. In the Mazda CX-9 turbos they rate the hp at different numbers for premium and regular. Low octane will cause turbo engines to set off the knock sensor and kill horsepower. Just an experiment. I was just curious for myself and if anybody else has tried and what they felt.
There's a difference between saying "It just makes me feel better to pay extra for premium fuel" vs "Premium fuel makes my car faster."

Mazda's engine is tuned to perform better on higher octane. Hyundai's 2.0T is not.
 

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There's a difference between saying "It just makes me feel better to pay extra for premium fuel" vs "Premium fuel makes my car faster."

Mazda's engine is tuned to perform better on higher octane. Hyundai's 2.0T is not.
It's like you are taking his dream and ripping it down and stomping on it in front of him
 

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All of the articles I've read on the subject of using higher octane fuel than required focus on the engine knock factor. I've never seen an article that mentions the additives that are in the higher octane gas and their benefits vs. using the lower octane fuel that doesn't have the cleaning additives. Has anybody?
 

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Higher than spec octane fuel can make a difference in hot weather.
Spark knock tendency increases with higher intake air temp.
Intake air temp is one of the differences between octane measurement by Research Method vs Motor Method.
In hot weather with spec octane the knock sensor has a greater chance of triggering ignition timing retard, reducing performance.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Well since I got no real life observations out of anybody here (just opinions mostly negative) I decided to do my own testing. Unscientific but I know what I feel. I have gone back and forth using regular and premium fuel every tank. There is no question, especially in hot weather with the power robbing A/C compressor running that I have significant less turbo Lag with premium. The altitude here in Denver also adds to the equation. Knock sensors do what they do but are doing it less often with premium fuel here in the summer at least.
 

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The 2.0T turbo was designed for an economy and some increase in power IT'S not a high-performance engine
235hp/260ftlb may not be Dodge Demon territory, but I wouldn't call it a "low performance" engine either (and with 20 MPG city I sure as $#@% wouldn't call it "designed for an economy" ;))And also the Theta II 2.0 Turbo GDI has several "performance" applications throughout the Hyundai/Kia line up. We just happen to have a somewhat "detuned" version of it (maybe smaller turbo?) And if you look around Kia forums throughout the internet, that engine does seem to reduce timing at least a bit with lower octane fuels because of the knock sensor, even in applications where the manual doesn't mention a performance gains with premium fuel. Now this reported amount is minuscule (10 hp), it might not apply anymore with our version of the engine, and no one has posted any actual dyno charts to verify this, but it'd be interesting if someone actually did this and posted results.
 

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Taking this further.... ;)

  • The reason Hyundai/Kia may not mention this minor gain with premium fuel is because 1) the difference is small enough to be meaningless in real world driving (what's 10hp - a couple tenths at most in a 1/4 mile run?) and 2) if they say "premium recommended" then all the car blog/mag tests are going to use premium for their stats - making this a much more expensive vehicle to own. And I'm thinking Hyundai is marketing this SUV to those concerned more about pennies than performance ;)
 

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“... I have significant less turbo Lag with premium.“
You may feel some additional power but I don’t think it has anything to do with turbo lag. Any “lag” in the 2.0t is likely from the auto trans.
 

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All of the articles I've read on the subject of using higher octane fuel than required focus on the engine knock factor. I've never seen an article that mentions the additives that are in the higher octane gas and their benefits vs. using the lower octane fuel that doesn't have the cleaning additives. Has anybody?
Texaco/Chevron puts the same level of additives in all 3 grades of gasoline, the greater amount required to comply with premium fuel requirements. Buy T/C regular and you're getting the identical cleaning properties as any other company's premium fuel. That's according to a former insurance client who is an engineer in Texaco's fuel program so I'm pretty sure he knows what he's talking about. And all grades have cleaning additives, just lower amounts except in the T/C brand fuels.
 

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Lookie what I found...Different car, older version of same engine - but still interesting...

 
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