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Hi all. I'm considering buying a 2003 Santa Fe 2.7 GLS in the next week. The one I am looking at has 215000 kms (133000 miles) and judging by the ad has had the recall work done for the subframe and rear trailing arms. I'll probably be looking at it tomorrow or Sunday and possibly purchasing it in the first part of next week. I have a few questions about Santa Fe's though. Firstly, what's the fuel mileage like for the 2.7 AWDs? Fuel Economy rates them at 16 city 22 highway but their ratings are always on the low side.

Secondly, how does the AWD system work? Is it like a Honda CRV, where it only engages when the front wheels spin for like 1.5 seconds or is it like a Subaru where it is variable from front to rear. How well do these do in light offroad situations? I like to explore old fire roads and cow paths and non-hardcore things like that. In a related question, how do they do in snow? Where I live, the snow plowing and de-icing can be shoddy at times and if there's a snowstorm in the late afternoon, my road often doesn't get plowed til late at night or sometimes the next day. In town, the road conditions can change from clear, to moderate snow drifts, to icy patches and slush all within a few hundred feet. Will the AWD system adequately handle those situations?

Third, how's the overall reliability, parts availability and serviceability for these? I'm not biased against any car (even Daewoos! :)) but I just have a negative feeling when I see a Hyundai because I've just seen so many rusted crappy ones, especially Sonatas and Accents. I can handle small repairs on my own or with help from my dad but something major like timing belt replacement is beyond my capabilities. I do have a reliable backyard mechanic who I take my cars to when I need something complex done. He does good work and he's quite affordable.

Here's a link to the ad for the Santa Fe in question:

2003 Hyundai Santa Fe gls SUV - Saint John Cars For Sale - Kijiji Saint John Canada.
 

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Well if you're worried about repairs, buying a used car that is over 10 years old isn't going to be the best option. You should figure on at least some major repairs over the next couple years.

Fuel economy is about what is reported for the 2.7. On my 3.5L I only get about 13-14 city but it does around 23 highway. Does pretty well in snow and can handle light duty offroading just fine with the 4wd. The 4wd is always on but is variable between front and wheel depending on need. Parts aren't hard to come by provided you live near a dealership. Takes about 1-2 days for me when ordering.

For 2800, that is a good price. You definitely need to ask about timing belt and spark plugs as those two can approach 2000 more if needing to be done.
 

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Well if you're worried about repairs, buying a used car that is over 10 years old isn't going to be the best option. You should figure on at least some major repairs over the next couple years.

Fuel economy is about what is reported for the 2.7. On my 3.5L I only get about 13-14 city but it does around 23 highway. Does pretty well in snow and can handle light duty offroading just fine with the 4wd. The 4wd is always on but is variable between front and wheel depending on need. Parts aren't hard to come by provided you live near a dealership. Takes about 1-2 days for me when ordering.

For 2800, that is a good price. You definitely need to ask about timing belt and spark plugs as those two can approach 2000 more if needing to be done.
My 2.7L is a awesome engine. If you don't consider city fuel economy. I get 16 City but at least 24 HWY. The seal on the transfer case is a big issue on the 4WD models if I'm not mistaking. The timing belt is a big big big item. I would have it done the second you get the car.

Honestly my 2002 2.7L 2WD is one of the best cars I have driven/owned. Biggest thing I recommend is just go drive it. Then start to worry about fuel economy. Just my 2 cents.
 

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Parts from the dealer can take up to a week to get in, unless they are put on a critical path, and brought in special which may mean additional freight charges

at 10 years
you can expect, :eek:

A lot of "Rust Related" Issues:(

causing
* evap system troubles
--anything from rusted lines, vent lines to filler neck pipe with rust perforation

* also with the massive amount of salt and sand used here I reckon the top of the fuel tank, is like a minefield of salt and sand potentially causing troubles with components there, problems with goodies on top of gas tank, may require a new tank.

* brake line trouble, rust holes at or near attachment points on chassis

* power steering trouble, rotten steel lines either those from the pump, or those directly on the rack

* Air Conditioning problems, worn out main bearings causing freon leak, or bad clutch bearing, and most dealers will only replace, complete units which can be pricey

* Brake problems, ie rear backing plates front backing plates

* Lower Ball joints

* front wheel bearings

* Rear Trailing arm bushings worn out, requires new arms

Very easy to spend $1000.oo to have a major component replaced:eek:

whacker
 

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Hi all. I'm considering buying a 2003 Santa Fe 2.7 GLS in the next week. The one I am looking at has 215000 kms (133000 miles) and judging by the ad has had the recall work done for the subframe and rear trailing arms. I'll probably be looking at it tomorrow or Sunday and possibly purchasing it in the first part of next week. I have a few questions about Santa Fe's though. Firstly, what's the fuel mileage like for the 2.7 AWDs? Fuel Economy rates them at 16 city 22 highway but their ratings are always on the low side.

Secondly, how does the AWD system work? Is it like a Honda CRV, where it only engages when the front wheels spin for like 1.5 seconds or is it like a Subaru where it is variable from front to rear. How well do these do in light offroad situations? I like to explore old fire roads and cow paths and non-hardcore things like that. In a related question, how do they do in snow? Where I live, the snow plowing and de-icing can be shoddy at times and if there's a snowstorm in the late afternoon, my road often doesn't get plowed til late at night or sometimes the next day. In town, the road conditions can change from clear, to moderate snow drifts, to icy patches and slush all within a few hundred feet. Will the AWD system adequately handle those situations?

Third, how's the overall reliability, parts availability and serviceability for these? I'm not biased against any car (even Daewoos! :)) but I just have a negative feeling when I see a Hyundai because I've just seen so many rusted crappy ones, especially Sonatas and Accents. I can handle small repairs on my own or with help from my dad but something major like timing belt replacement is beyond my capabilities. I do have a reliable backyard mechanic who I take my cars to when I need something complex done. He does good work and he's quite affordable.

Here's a link to the ad for the Santa Fe in question:

2003 Hyundai Santa Fe gls SUV - Saint John Cars For Sale - Kijiji Saint John Canada.
I have 127k miles on the same year car. Make sure there are no leaks on the transfer case. It's a full time 4wd, no switching between 2wd and 4wd. The vehicle is not an off road "jeep" type vehicle, but if you are talking occasional short jaunts into the woods it works just fine. Right now I get 18 MPG city and 24/25 MPG highway. I got a couple MPG more brand new. My vehicle has only been in the shop one at 80k miles for a timing belt. All other maintenance I do myself(I'm 62) and have had no trouble doing it. Right now I have to fill up the transfer case a couple times a year because of leaks. I had to relace the CPS(crankcase position sensor) myself. If I were buying this vehicle I would make sure the CPS was replaced prior to buying and that the transfer case didn't leak. I would also find out how long it had been since a timing belt change and make them do that if it had been a long time. If you live in a high salt area, you could be looking at having lots of your fluid lines replaced shortly down the road if they didn't so a yearly salt prevention spray. Good luck in your buy.
 
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