Hyundai Forums banner

41 - 60 of 61 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
1. Does the car give an indication, while in EV MODE, of the threshold beyond which throttle input will cause the ICE to start?
Yes, there's an 'ECO' range that is like 0-20% of full power. I very rarely go over that, but you may on on ramps, etc when you have to gun it a little. But the ICE turns on/off in like 2 seconds and it's all so smooth that it's quite impressive.

2. When you are attempting to establish a Glide, (zero energy flow state while driving) it appeared during my test drive that simply lifting your foot off the throttle put the car in this state. My Prius will regen slighty when off throttle and requires slight throttle pressure to zero out the energy flow and glide.
Yep, when you aren't accerating it will go to to regen charging mode, or like when braked at stop light it will say 'idle mode' and be silent of course. Now if you're running the cabin heat on high in 40 degree temps, the ICE may run until it reaches temp. Living in MN, this of course happened a lot in the winter. Again, once it's around set temp, it's full EV to sustain it from what I've seen.

3. Is my observation correct and applicable to the Sonata PHEV correct? Thus it only regens when the brake pedal is applied?
I believe it goes to regen even when no pedals are down. It's not actively braking and probably barely gets any juice, but it does go to regen I believe when you just are coasting on the highway, and of course downhill.

I'm impressed with what I've seen so far, and dealers are offer impressing discount, and incentives. And the size, comfort, convienence, tech, EV range, etc are very impressive.

Yes, I've loved the car so far. No major flaws, and just some picky minor stuff I would like changed. My wife goes to work and back everyday on 100% EV, and now that it's not winter anymore we are getting 99.9MPG probably 90% of the time we use it. Maybe on weekends when we drive more often, and we don't have 220 at the house yet, so we run out of EV range on weekends.

Tell me if you have any other questions, as I really feel the dealers don't even sell it right. There's no reason in my mind why someone should by a base hybird or really any non plug in Sonata. Simply because you get at least the $4800 back in EV tax credit, that makes the Plug in cheaper than lesser Sonata models. That and of course over 5-10 years of ownership, much less gas, $, and less CO2 if you're charging with renewable energy as I can with Xcel Windsource program here.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
24 Posts
I have some Hypermiling questions about the 2016 Sonata PHV.
1. Does the car give an indication, while in EV MODE, of the threshold beyond which throttle input will cause the ICE to start?
2. When you are attempting to establish a Glide, (zero energy flow state while driving) it appeared during my test drive that simply lifting your foot off the throttle put the car in this state. My Prius will regen slighty when off throttle and requires slight throttle pressure to zero out the energy flow and glide.
3. Is my observation correct and applicable to the Sonata PHEV correct? Thus it only regens when the brake pedal is applied?
1. No, it does not. But there is a distinct point in the pedal play where you feel a clicking, and then it starts the ICE. After a while you know when the switch is pushed.
2. Not really, lifting the foot just puts it in charge mode, ever so slightly. But just like the Prius, a faint push on the pedal will make it glide.
3. It regens when you lift the foot or when you push the brake, right until a few miles per hour when the brake pads click in. The handy Charge dial shows this nicely.

Cheers
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
154 Posts
1. No, it does not. But there is a distinct point in the pedal play where you feel a clicking, and then it starts the ICE. After a while you know when the switch is pushed.
The "green zone" (up to 40% power) is the safe zone (no chance the ICE will turn on) when running on battery with some charge. That's a pretty clear indication.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
24 Posts
The "green zone" (up to 40% power) is the safe zone (no chance the ICE will turn on) when running on battery with some charge. That's a pretty clear indication.
I also noticed on Auto Cruise sometimes it goes off the green zone, upper of 40%, yet the ICE does not kick in. Of course, this would not contradict your point that the green zone is safe zone.

But I clearly noticed, during my trial and errors, the click point while pressing the pedal, and beyond that the ICE kicked in.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,516 Posts
Wayne Gerdes test driving the PHEV HSH

Make friends with Wayne on Facebook and follow his review.

"Love the light steering around town. The 27 miles of all-electric range (AER) offering almost 60 miles on a single charge was a true highlight yesterday.

#Efficient #long #distance #traveler - #CleanMPG"

Wayne holds many World Records for highest MPG. What has been your longest all EV range so far?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,000 Posts
Sorry, did I read this right? Wayne can drive 60 miles on all-electric? How is that possible?
The same way he drove across the country (San Diego to the Atlantic) on two tanks of gas in the 2011 Sonata Hybrid, 2,269 miles at almost 60 mpg in January.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,516 Posts
Can you post a link for either of the blog entries or whatever form of writing it was?
Wayne Gerdes

World Record across country

Hypermiler Wayne Gerdes: After 2,269 miles and 59 mpg, Hyundai Sonata Hybrid "kicks ass" - Autoblog

2016 HSH Review

2016 Hyundai Sonata Hybrid First Drive Review | CleanMPG

Wayne reviews different cars every week for years and has recommended the PHEV HSH for his wife's next car. He owns and runs the "cleanmpg" website". He taught me how to hypermile when he came to San Diego back in 2011.:smile:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
I hope to finally take delivery of my black PHEV Limited tonight. Even though I don't have the car yet, here are a few insights from my experiences with other vehicles and in buying my new Sonata PHEV:

  • The setting to tilt the side mirrors in reverse is common in luxury cars. The Lexus RX400h we had worked exactly the same (the mirror set switch had to be on left or right, not "off").
  • Using the HEV + Charge setting is not efficient under most circumstances. On my Prius, the only time it makes sense to use it ('B') is on long downhill stretches of highway so that you can fully recharge the battery. I'll see how that works on the Sonata PHEV, but with the Prius, is also provides a light "engine braking" effect.
  • As a resident of a non-CARB state, I had some challenges with my purchase. First, I arranged to test drive a Sonata PHEV while on a business trip in Maryland. Even there, they had never plugged the car in, so I couldn't experience any real EV driving. A couple months later, I contacted a local Arizona dealer and was assured they could find me a Sonata PHEV from California and that they had been trained to sell and service the car. Then, when I arrived at the dealership, they had clearly decided that I was willing to pay full MSRP since I wanted the first Sonata PHEV they ever sold. I had to push hard before they would show me the official Costco member pricing and to get the Hyundai rebates applied to the price. When I suggested that I could get a much better price at a dealer in California or Oregon, they immediately responded that if I did that, then I would have to take the car there for servicing as well since they have no technicians trained yet for the PHEV. In the end, I agreed to pay a little extra cover the cost of trucking the car from a dealer in California.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
54 Posts
As I remember, the Prius "B" mode actually turns on the ICE to burn off excess energy during braking. This is to keep the battery from overcharging during down hill runs. If you ever go down the grape vine in a prius either direction the battery will reach full which is 80% SOC and the engine will turn on automatically to burn off excess regen if the driver does not put the car into "B" mode. It is toyota's way to preserve battery life. This is very different from the "B" mode in most EV out there where that implies heavier regen when on.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Two weeks of Ownership
The rated 27 miles of all-electric range: I’m getting between 30-32 miles per charge, with most speeds being below 60 MPH. I’m sure it will go down a few miles during the winter months
The rated 40 mileage MPG combined: I’m getting between 52-57 MPG again with most speeds being below 60 MPH. With speeds 65-70 it has dropped sown to 42-45.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
New owner of a 2017 PHEV and loving it so far.

I've had it about 6 weeks and I'm overall at about 90MPG. Still on my first tank of gas, just slightly over half a tank left, and I'm at around 465 total miles. It's getting a little tougher since the weather here in Salt Lake has turned colder, with morning temps in the 20s, so more heater and ICE use has put a dent in the milage. But I couldn't be happier so far. I'm hoping to get through the end of the year without refilling, which should be doable. Filling up 3-4 times a year would be pretty great.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Heater runs on gas

We love our 2016 Sonata plug-in except for one thing. When it's cold outside the engine kicks in to provide heat for the cabin. So even on short trips when the battery has plenty of energy to move the car and heat the cabin we burn gas for heat. It does not appear that there is any way to override this and use the battery for cabin heat. Does anyone have a different impression? This causes a lot of gasoline consumption that would be unnecessary if the cabin heater would run off the battery.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
140 Posts
We love our 2016 Sonata plug-in except for one thing. When it's cold outside the engine kicks in to provide heat for the cabin. So even on short trips when the battery has plenty of energy to move the car and heat the cabin we burn gas for heat. It does not appear that there is any way to override this and use the battery for cabin heat. Does anyone have a different impression? This causes a lot of gasoline consumption that would be unnecessary if the cabin heater would run off the battery.
That's the way the car was designed to work.

Some folks turn down the temperature on the climate control and use the heated seats and steering wheel (limited model only) to use the battery more.

Personally, I don't feel it's that big of a deal. However, safety, reliability and availability of parts when necessary are a big deal to me.

Having the car conk out while driving on a busy freeway with nowhere to go is scary and dangerous. Waiting 4 to 8 weeks for parts is unacceptable.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Needless gas consumption

Now that I understand that Hyundai designed the plug-in Sonata to use the gas motor to heat the cabin and run the defroster, it seems like a pretty serious flaw for those living in a northern latitude. We find ourselves going to the gas station fairly frequently in the winter, almost entirely to buy gas to run the motor to provide cabin heat. Kind of defeats the purpose of having a car that supposedly can run on electricity for short trips. Yes, you can use the electric seat and steering wheel heaters and shiver along virtuously. But how many people are really going to be happy with that? We really like the car and have had no other problems, but just sticking a little resistant heat coil in the heating system so you could run the heater off the battery on short trips would save a lot of gas.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
140 Posts
Now that I understand that Hyundai designed the plug-in Sonata to use the gas motor to heat the cabin and run the defroster, it seems like a pretty serious flaw for those living in a northern latitude. We find ourselves going to the gas station fairly frequently in the winter, almost entirely to buy gas to run the motor to provide cabin heat. Kind of defeats the purpose of having a car that supposedly can run on electricity for short trips. Yes, you can use the electric seat and steering wheel heaters and shiver along virtuously. But how many people are really going to be happy with that? We really like the car and have had no other problems, but just sticking a little resistant heat coil in the heating system so you could run the heater off the battery on short trips would save a lot of gas.
I wouldn't consider it to be a design flaw, but a design trade-off.

What is your gas mileage for low speed, under 35 miles per hour, short trips of under 5 miles in the winter versus the same route not using the gas engine for heating in the summer?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
140 Posts
I wouldn't consider it to be a design flaw, but a design trade-off.

What is your gas mileage for low speed, under 35 miles per hour, short trips of under 5 miles in the winter versus the same route not using the gas engine for heating in the summer?
I have since changed my mine and now agree that this a design flaw.
 
41 - 60 of 61 Posts
Top