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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
We've been having a lot of damp rainy weather the past few days. Tried to back the 2018 Elantra out of the garage (which is open to elements) to clean off wet leaves and the parking brake wasn't having it. Of course the brake was released before putting car in reverse. I should mention it's a Limited with a little over 9K miles, discs all around. Figured it was just the pads sticking to rotor surface rust and backed it out anyway. Not much throttle used at all. There was a pop sound, and then the car moved normally, albeit with a lot of the expected rusty rotor scraping sound. But soon I discovered the pop sound wasn't going away completely. When applying brakes or hand brake there is a slight thump thump on right rear of car. Haven't left driveway yet, just back and forth a few yards.
What should I do now? Just take it to brake service shop or dealer or can this be addressed with brakeclean and parking brake cable adjustment?
 

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Posted on this several times, brand new vehicle, seven of the eight caliper pins bone dry, daughters year older Kia also came with 4 wheel disk brakes. Hers were dragging like crazy, needed to use on of my many pullers to remove those caliper pins, they are required to center the caliper.

Pad ends were painted, hers, paint chipped off soiled rust to the pad clips on the pad brackets, had to use a hammer to remove them, also rust build up under the clips to even bind the pads as well. Since our 17 Limited was brand new, could remove them by hand. Cleaned all contacting surfaces and used anti-seize for rust prevention and lubrication.

All of those cast iron brake parts got a coat of anti-seize, not plated where they make contact. If you don't do this, will have a heck of a time, even try removing the wheel, and lug nuts will rust on solid. Government claims road salt saves lives, but also rust the heck out of our cars.

Both our vehicles never had the parking brake adjusted right, that lever on the caliper has to return to the stop to be adjusted correctly and the slightest raising of the parking brake lever should move it forward. On her Kia Soul, just had to pop off the rear panel to access the cable adjustment on her center console, used a plastic pry bar, and very carefully so I don't break those tabs, screwed if you do. On the Limited, had to remove the entire console to get access.

If you read your owners manual, brakes are not covered under warranty. This is one darn reason they are not. Shame on you Hyundai. Simple test is to spin your wheel, hit the brake pedal, should spin free again. Hitting a power brake pedal have 1,500 psi of hydraulic brake pressure, but when you release the pedal, return pressure is only 2 psi, not fair at all. No problem in applying them, major problem in releasing them.

Ha, brother-in-law came over with his new Ford for me to install mud flaps, call these splash shields now, have to, even on the Elantra, tires stick out, can kick stones on the door panels in the front, on the rear, your back bumper. no shields tons of stone chips.

Also installed splash shields on our new Limited. On his brand new Ford, wheels were rusted on so bad of is that good, I could not remove them, yes the five lug nuts were removed. Told him to take it back to his dealer his dealer could not remove the rear tires either so had to replace the entire rear end. What would you do in some very isolated place if you were out of cell phone range and had a flat tire. You would be screwed. All vehicles have brakes that can rust solid, should be a law.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
took wheel off and sprayed parking brake cable ends and spring with WD40. Here's the visual:
451437


When turning the rotor by hand that bar of rust and pad material at the 12 o'clock position goes thunk in the caliper and basically stops the wheel. You can push past it, and the rotor isn't frozen anywhere else. Should I remove the rotor to brakekleen her off? Or just drive around despite the noise to clean it off?
I'm worried that I maybe broke something when overcoming the resistance of the stuck pad or cable. Nothing seems to be obviously wrong except for that thump thump sound which I'm sure is more pronounced on the passenger side, as seen here. The parking brake cable and actuating mechanisms don't seem symmetrically located from passenger to driver's side, like maybe the cables aren't correctly adjusted. I did grease the caliper pins with CRC Silaramic brake lube about a year back. I haven't had any problem with the parking brake prior to this. Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
There's so much pad material stuck on at that ridge it casts a shadow you can see with the naked eye. Maybe put on semi metallic pads for a few days to purge and detox the rotor?
 

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There's so much pad material stuck on at that ridge it casts a shadow you can see with the naked eye. Maybe put on semi metallic pads for a few days to purge and detox the rotor?
Your rotor is showing all signs of brake pad dragging and rotor overheating and grooving the rotor. Rear wheel, should spin very easily, no driven axles. Front wheels take more effort, both should be off the ground, opposite wheel will rotate in the opposite direction, more drag due to the differential. Wiling to bet a cup of coffee your front rotors look just as bad or even worse, responsible for about 85% of the braking.

WD-40 is next to worthless for problems like this, not even classified as a lubricant. If that rotor is warped, its history. On our Hyundai and Kia vehicles, same company, parking brake was well lubricated, but that was all.
 

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Hyundai did copy that manual trunk and gas door release designed by Toyota, with my GM stuff, electric solenoid quit, only way to get into the trunk was to remove the rear seat back cushion. I couldn't crawl back there, but my then seven year old son could, pointing to a spot could tell me to release the trunk lock to open. A bit off topic, but seen many movies where they are locking people in a trunk, haven't been in one yet that could not be opened in the inside.

Back on topic, what Hyundai did not copy from Toyota is the rear disc caliper, but from GM that I found irritating, But been putting up with that combo parking/service brake Caliper GM came out with for some 42 year.

Not even mentioned in the owners manual, I cannot find it. Rear brakes are adjusted by working the parking brake. That lever pulled forward from its stop should be like a ratchet wrench, if not far enough dog doesn't slip into a gear, but if the pads are worn enough, will catch and rotate the brake piston that is on a screw to take up the pad play.

Really haven't taken Hyundai's version of this apart, GM was using a steel one way ring, that would cut into the piston, so wouldn't take up the play. Back then, dealer only caliper, 300 bucks, with inflation more like 650 bucks today and if both sides were bad, 1,300 bucks, and just for the part, not for labor.

Sure painted my entire combo rear caliper with anti-seize, if salt water gets in that screw will rust it solid so can't be adjusted. Also need a special tool to screw in that caliper piston when replacing the pads. With many GM cars, piston was rusted solid, latest price was 190 bucks for a new caliper.

What Toyota is doing, same caliper as the front that is inherently self adjusting, with a 30 year old Supra, had to rebuild my calipers cost me $2.30 each plus a little work. Rotor has a brake drum with mechanically operated shoes. And since you only apply these brakes when parked, never ware out. So much more intelligent what GM and Hyundai are doing and I hope they read this.

Another bad joke are these law required traction and ABS control modules, what a piece of crap these are, really stupid, only pulse once per second should be more like 10 light pulses per second. Ice is never constant on roads, with bare spots, with that long second delay, tire will slip on ice, be locked up hit a bare spot and tear up your front suspension. Really a very stupid design, and not by vehicle manufactures but idiots running out country. Traction control is just the opposite but pulses the brakes on rather than release them in ABS mode. Way too long to do any good, but yet made law by politicians that have zero technical knowledge.

Other problem is that ABS pump is a toy sized motor that can only be activated with a way over priced scanner. So if you remove a caliper, fluid leaks out, get air in that module and will never get it out.

Tried in simple terms to explain this to my senator and congressman, didn't have the slightest idea what I was talking about, yet they made this law. Really stupid.

If you have to replace any caliper, put a two by ten board in front of your seat, and use a stick to hold down your brake pedal as far as it will go. This keeps the master cylinder from drain leaving air in the ABS module. That is just a 4" cube made in China, really a bad joke and want 500 bucks for this piece of crap, indubitably throwaway.
 

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Go out and bed those pads in good. Get up to speed and come to a very hard stop 4 or 5 times then drive home calmy and let the brakes cool. Every time I get wobbling or noise in the brakes this will cure it.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Here's my plan. I have metallic braking pads on the way, for this car both front and back axles, and also for my Accent's front discs but that's another story. I pop the metallic scrapers on the Elantra, and drive it around a few days. Afterwards I look to see the pad deposit ridges are gone, and if they are then I restore the old. original Hyundai pads and bed them in. And if they are not, I have the rotors resurfaced. Or maybe I take the rotors off and whizz them with a 80 grit pad on an electric drill, then 100+ grit. If they are driving like crap after that, then I just replace pads and rotors and resolve never to set the handbrake on the Elantra again, rain or shine.

I will check on the pins, but they effin' well should be sliding easy, since I re-greased them a year ago and the car hasn't even driven a thousand miles since.
 

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Disc brakes became popular in the mid 60's with a host of new problems drum brakes never had, totally exposed to the environment where drum brakes were enclosed.

The consequences are, and been doing this for 55 years now, is to take them all apart, clean and lubricate them. If done correctly, in road salt areas should be done every three years.

Seen more idiots for an accurate name install pads with a hammer. Feel its hazardous both to your vehicle and you to drive like a maniac and slam on your brakes, have to be taken apart cleaned and lubricated.

If you stop at a rest stop, only takes a few seconds to hold the back of your hand to each wheel, should all be cool, but if you have a dragging pad, will really feel the heat. Don't touch it, will be badly burned. Seen some rotors red and that is a bright red hot.

The only way I know how to do a brake job correctly is to do it myself.
 

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I've learned to take mine apart every year. Fords were bad in the back with the disc brakes. And my Accent front brakes need it also with the way the pads slide on the stainless steel shim. I had to file out the rusty caliper tabs last time to even get the shim to seat in the groove.

The Gen Coupe has Brembos and that is how every brake caliper set up should be. Easy and seldom a problem. No slider pins and you can change pads in less than a minute per side if you train for it.
 

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I've learned to take mine apart every year. Fords were bad in the back with the disc brakes. And my Accent front brakes need it also with the way the pads slide on the stainless steel shim. I had to file out the rusty caliper tabs last time to even get the shim to seat in the groove.

The Gen Coupe has Brembos and that is how every brake caliper set up should be. Easy and seldom a problem. No slider pins and you can change pads in less than a minute per side if you train for it.
We share identical experiences with these brakes. Ha, with my 30 Olds, Ford, and 33 Buick and a kid, would adjust all four wheel with the sames slight amount of brake drag. But these systems drove people nuts, if one wheel brake was just a tad tighter with mechanical brakes, would pull to that side when applied.

Disc brakes are the same, when the brake pedal is released, just a slight amount of drag on each wheel. The pads must return to their home position.

When buying pads, always insisted on plated back plates, unfortunately the stock Hyundai pads are painted at the tips. This is a problem, and those clips on the pad holders trap road salt, expands and locks the pads, so they cannot return to the home position.

Doesn't take any brains to do a brake job, just common sense.

Oh, our wonderful EPA back in around 1988 banned electroplating in the USA, never helped us with problems, just banned or fined us, really a terrible governmental agency. My company was critical on electroplating, Couldn't get a good job in Mexico so we went to Thailand. Raised cost, owners finally threw in the towel and move the company to China. Only two bucks a day for a 16 hour shift six days a week. Poor job of plating, company went broke.
 

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...I will check on the pins, but they effin' well should be sliding easy, since I re-greased them a year ago and the car hasn't even driven a thousand miles since.
I am wondering if this is the kind of thing that is more affected by time than by miles. Indeed, especially if it doesn't get driven much, they may even get worse faster.
 

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The rear pins are always the worst. Especially with winter driving. Personally I gave up on the standard silicone grease that is usually used and went to a copper based electrical corrosion grease. The stuff is extremely persistent and sticks on the pins. Messy stuff though.

So if they were not properly greased and then not used that may be the problem.

I'm like Nicholas, I don't trust anyone with my brakes. Just did a complete rebuild with new parts on the rear hubs and ebrake cables of my Accent. The old style shoes and drum that never have worked very good. Turns out the proper tension on the ebrake cables is extremely relevant. I have always had issues but manage to get them working. So this time I tried to follow the factory manual as far as reassembling them. LOL no way will that work. As they had the hold down pins being put in last. Which I do and ended up again doing first.

I bled it really good yesterday and today will see if the front is donig OK after a test drive. The pedal has been a little spongy for a few years. Got some air and old fluid out of the front right when I bled this time though. The rears I put new wheel cylinders and hoses on so I just let about a cup of fluid drip out of the open bleeder screw after putting all back together. Then a few pedal pumps and screw openings with no air.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
So I got my semi-metallic rear pads and swapped them in this afternoon - cleaning and lubing everything that's supposed to be revisited on brake service. One lap around the 'burbs this evening and things are much better. Can't see that ridge of deposits anymore I don't think. Probably that would have worked just as well with the ceramic pads, but I'm not sorry I got the metallics for aggressive cleaning. I haven't taken the wheels off again to inspect the rotors in detail. But they are much cleaner and shiny now. The cleaning lap started out with horrible sounds like sschrrss-thunk ssschrss-thunk sschrss-thunk and alarming grabbiness, and ended with very quiet and normal feeling brakes operation. Still have to get the parking brake fully equalized. What a PITA design that is. That could have been the main cause of the problem to begin with. The really sticky pad/rotor was on the passenger side. 12 months back I did a brake clean and lube and I remember being very confused and frustrated by the parking brake set up.
 
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