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2020 Sonata Limited in Calypso Red
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I am not sure how to best use the paddle shifters. I never learned how to drive a stick shift, so I'd like some advice on how to use them.
Maybe it might be beneficial for hills or the snow (to change gears as needed), I'm just not sure.

I tried them once and saw the gear I was in, but I just had no idea what it meant or if I should shift up or down.

I'm worried that if I use them incorrectly over the long term, it would damage the transmission, but I would like to know since I have the feature.

So I'd happily take any advice you have for a noob stick driver.
 

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I am not sure how to best use the paddle shifters. I never learned how to drive a stick shift, so I'd like some advice on how to use them.
Maybe it might be beneficial for hills or the snow (to change gears as needed), I'm just not sure.

I tried them once and saw the gear I was in, but I just had no idea what it meant or if I should shift up or down.

I'm worried that if I use them incorrectly over the long term, it would damage the transmission, but I would like to know since I have the feature.

So I'd happily take any advice you have for a noob stick driver.
I use them to downshift (left paddle) when trying to slow the vehicle on a steep decline without the need to use the brakes (e.g. on a mountain road).
 

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I am not sure how to best use the paddle shifters. I never learned how to drive a stick shift, so I'd like some advice on how to use them.
I’ll give it a shot and provide some info.

Yes, it helps a lot if you have driven a stick. When you drive a stick, you learn how a car responds to gear changes, especially how the timing of those changes makes a difference. If you have experience with bicycle gears, there are some similarities.

First, as far as I know, the engine computer will prevent you from destroying your transmission. You probably know that driving with the RPMs in the red for an extended period is a bad idea.

You can shift for UTILITY reasons like @A440 does. Downshifting to produce engine braking, commonly used on hills. When you shift down, the engine is going to provide resistance and the car will slow down. Why do this? Avoid wear and tear on brakes and/or more controlled slowing on wet roads. However, it’s not a good idea to sit in an extreme RPM state for long periods.

Another UTILITY reason would be upshifting to deal with snow. I have zero experience with snow. Maybe someone else can take this one.

Then there’s the real reason for paddle shifters – PERFORMANCE. Controlling the up and downshift to get more power and control. The basic move is downshift, then press the gas. You’ll notice an immediate increase in power compared to pressing the gas and letting the computer do the shifting when it sees fit. It’s that same bump in power you get when you hold the gas pedal to the floor for a few moments, except when you do it manually, there is no delay. Oh, this is fun on a curvy road!

Keep in mind – shifting down, especially multiple gears, can cause the car to slow dramatically and you’ll jerk forward depending on how you do it. Your brake lights don’t come on when your car is slowing because of engine braking. Be careful. On the flip side, upshifting will reduce your ability to accelerate quickly.

You kind of need to play with it to get the feel. Just do one or two gears at a time in an open, clear area, not in traffic. You can practice engine braking pretty easily (no one behind you!). Doing the fun, performance shifting may take some practice.

By the way, I don't use the paddle shifters much. I would be surprised if anyone uses them routinely but others can comment on this.

That’s my take. Hope it helps.
 

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My .02, if you are unsure how they work, leave them alone. They "tell us" the reason no one wants a manual is auto's today can shift faster then anyone with a manual (personally I thinks that BS). So they turned around and put in paddle shifters.....

They are a gimmic and don't add anything to performance. In drive mine will down shift automatically on hills to control speed.

On another hand, my Charger has them and it is fun to down shift and hear the active exhaust open up.....lol
 

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In drive mine will down shift automatically on hills to control speed.
Really? I haven't tried tried this. Not a lot of steep hills here. It just does it when you start down?
 

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Really? I haven't tried tried this. Not a lot of steep hills here. It just does it when you start down?
I notice it on a decent hill using cruise, some if you just applying the brakes. After it picks up a few MPH's, it will start to down shift a gear or 2. You will hear the motor rev as it downshift. My Hyundai and Dodge do it. When I come out of the mountains, it will just several gears, tach will run about mid 4000. Once you level back out, upshifts.
 

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I use them to downshift (left paddle) when trying to slow the vehicle on a steep decline without the need to use the brakes (e.g. on a mountain road).
I never drove standard but I remember the old days in automatic drive doing what you described shifting the car on hills and to first gear for a burst of speed to pass a car in single lane two way roads. When you'd had the broken line on your side to allow passing. Every road of that type in NYS is double SOLID lines today.
 

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My .02, if you are unsure how they work, leave them alone. They "tell us" the reason no one wants a manual is auto's today can shift faster then anyone with a manual (personally I thinks that BS). So they turned around and put in paddle shifters.....

They are a gimmic and don't add anything to performance. In drive mine will down shift automatically on hills to control speed.

On another hand, my Charger has them and it is fun to down shift and hear the active exhaust open up.....lol
I do believe race drivers use auto for that reason, hey can shift in miliseconds. Just my opinion. As for paddle shifters, I used them once on my G80, then asked myself, Why? Never use them on my Palisade.
 

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I do believe race drivers use auto for that reason, hey can shift in miliseconds. Just my opinion. As for paddle shifters, I used them once on my G80, then asked myself, Why? Never use them on my Palisade.
Well not quite. They use a semi-automatic gear box. They pick when they want to change gears and the car does it without the need for a clutch.

But yes, automatic gearboxes are faster than manual gearboxes. @solman98 - read up on how fast modern automatic transmissions can shift. You might be surprised.
 

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But yes, automatic gearboxes are faster than manual gearboxes. @solman98 - read up on how fast modern automatic transmissions can shift. You might be surprised.
How fast it can shift, does not always equal how fast it can shift.... Or control the gears by the driver. Give me 2 equal cars, on auto and one manual. The manual will have more control. Auto's will always have more driveline loss ofver a manual. It's better today, but still present. Not talking about race cars or super cars.
 

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How fast it can shift, does not always equal how fast it can shift.... Or control the gears by the driver. Give me 2 equal cars, on auto and one manual. The manual will have more control. Auto's will always have more driveline loss ofver a manual. It's better today, but still present. Not talking about race cars or super cars.
More control with a manual? Agreed. More driveline losses with auto? Yeah, although it's not that bad.

None of this has to do with how quickly it can shift. An automatic gear box does shift faster. Does it shift exactly when you want it to? No, of course not. Does it give you full control? Nope (with some notable exceptions). But it does shift faster.
 

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More control with a manual? Agreed. More driveline losses with auto? Yeah, although it's not that bad.

None of this has to do with how quickly it can shift. An automatic gear box does shift faster. Does it shift exactly when you want it to? No, of course not. Does it give you full control? Nope (with some notable exceptions). But it does shift faster.
Sure it does. Shifting goes in both directions. How fast will a typical auto downshift to get you into the power band? I can do it instantly with a manual, say to cruise at 3500 or 4500 rpm vs 2500. People seem to forget that shifting goes both ways. Even the computer will shift an auto to protect it. Won't ever do that with a manual. By more control I can achieve faster shifts. Shush boxes don't shift as fast as you might think.
 

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In most cases there is a difference when you are talking "automatic transmission" now. A standard automatic using a torque converter vs a dual clutch (wet or dry) automatic (or some of the more expensive hi end cars are now also dual clutch with a torque converter).

1.Torque Converter Automatics (slush boxes) are much better than in the past and there are some that are pretty good with crisp, fast up and down shifts (in auto or manual mode). using the manual mode (paddles or shift lever) can allow the driver to take control of shift points to a greater level. Although most will over ride manual mode and still shift based on their programming when driven hard. In most cases they are now providing better EPA MPG than manuals.

2. Almost all Dual Clutch, wet or dry (basically manual transmission with an automatic / electronic clutch) can change gears faster than most drivers can using a manual transmission and with many of them also adding rev matching they are more efficient in getting the power to the ground than can be done with a manual transmission.
The wet clutch are usually the better of the two and also last longer especially under hard / performance driving.
nearly all of the high end cars , Porsche, Ferrari etc have been offering only Dual Clutch for a while now.
 

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Sure it does. Shifting goes in both directions. How fast will a typical auto downshift to get you into the power band? I can do it instantly with a manual, say to cruise at 3500 or 4500 rpm vs 2500. People seem to forget that shifting goes both ways. Even the computer will shift an auto to protect it. Won't ever do that with a manual. By more control I can achieve faster shifts. Shush boxes don't shift as fast as you might think.
You're asking how fast it will react to get you the power you need. That's not the same conversation as "how fast can it shift". I agree with you that you have more control over when a shift happens with a manual. You'll be able to do this when you actually need it, instead of leaving it up to the computer. No disagreement from me.

But if you're talking about the time it takes to shift an auto vs a manual, regardless of when that shift happens, the auto will be faster.

You're having a different conversation than how this started in your initial post, where you claimed you can shift faster. You can't. The time it takes you to go from one gear to the other, either up or down, is longer than the times it takes an automatic to accomplish the same shift. Just because you timed it better doesn't mean you're faster at it.
 
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