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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys, first time poster. I keep getting code P0106 on my 2013 Hyundai Elantra. Upon further research that is for the MAP Sensor. I got this code today after startup, and 3 weeks ago while I was driving. I had an ECM code then too but do not now. The car then would not let me go above 50MPH. Any simple ideas before I just throw money at it?
 

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map sensor usually has vacuum connections. check for leaks. vacuum hoses shrink and get hard over time, and they lose the seal, and crack
 

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So I check the wiring, looks fine visually but who knows. I checked the vacuum lines as well. Didn't find any cracks or loose hoses. I reset the check engine light and have had no problems since. I guess I can replace the sensor and see if that fixes it. I just don't want to waste $80 if it's something simpler than that. But I suppose that would be my next option? Besides ignoring and resetting the light whenever it happens.
 

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I just don't want to waste $80 if it's something simpler than that.
In that case you should maybe try cleaning the throttle valve before blowing $80 on a new sensor.

The PCM knows what the MAP should be for a given throttle angle and it is constantly comparing throttle angle (TPS) and the manifold pressure (MAP). When the relationship between the two values gets out of spec the PCM logs a trouble code. Sometimes the code that is logged is a MAP range/performance code, like you have, and sometimes it's a TPS code. The PCM has no way of knowing which of the two values is incorrect so what code you get just depends on the programmed logic of the particular PCM.

When you get a build up of carbon deposits on the throttle valve two things happen. The build up prevents the throttle valve from fully closing, and it restricts the amount of air that is allowed to pass into the manifold. The result of that is the PCM receives a MAP sensor input that it should get when the throttle is fully closed, but the TPS is telling it that the throttle isn't actually fully closed. So tthe confused PCM logs a sensor range/performance trouble code.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
In that case you should maybe try cleaning the throttle valve before blowing $80 on a new sensor.

The PCM knows what the MAP should be for a given throttle angle and it is constantly comparing throttle angle (TPS) and the manifold pressure (MAP). When the relationship between the two values gets out of spec the PCM logs a trouble code. Sometimes the code that is logged is a MAP range/performance code, like you have, and sometimes it's a TPS code. The PCM has no way of knowing which of the two values is incorrect so what code you get just depends on the programmed logic of the particular PCM.

When you get a build up of carbon deposits on the throttle valve two things happen. The build up prevents the throttle valve from fully closing, and it restricts the amount of air that is allowed to pass into the manifold. The result of that is the PCM receives a MAP sensor input that it should get when the throttle is fully closed, but the TPS is telling it that the throttle isn't actually fully closed. So tthe confused PCM logs a sensor range/performance trouble code.
Very informative! Thank you!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
In that case you should maybe try cleaning the throttle valve before blowing $80 on a new sensor.

The PCM knows what the MAP should be for a given throttle angle and it is constantly comparing throttle angle (TPS) and the manifold pressure (MAP). When the relationship between the two values gets out of spec the PCM logs a trouble code. Sometimes the code that is logged is a MAP range/performance code, like you have, and sometimes it's a TPS code. The PCM has no way of knowing which of the two values is incorrect so what code you get just depends on the programmed logic of the particular PCM.

When you get a build up of carbon deposits on the throttle valve two things happen. The build up prevents the throttle valve from fully closing, and it restricts the amount of air that is allowed to pass into the manifold. The result of that is the PCM receives a MAP sensor input that it should get when the throttle is fully closed, but the TPS is telling it that the throttle isn't actually fully closed. So tthe confused PCM logs a sensor range/performance trouble code.
Just cleaned the throttle body out. Engine performed well but a few hours later the CEL came on and I had the code. So I guess it's time to replace the sensor. Any opinion?
 

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Just cleaned the throttle body out....but a few hours later the CEL came on
Oh well, it was worth a try. Sorry it didn't help in this particular occasion.

Does your scan tool allow you to view the freeze frame data that was recorded when the code was logged? Sometimes that can give you a clue about what is causing the PCM to throw a code.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Oh well, it was worth a try. Sorry it didn't help in this particular occasion.

Does your scan tool allow you to view the freeze frame data that was recorded when the code was logged? Sometimes that can give you a clue about what is causing the PCM to throw a code.
I appreciate the help. I believe it does. What should I look for?
 

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What should I look for?
I'm not really sure to be honest. Post the data and maybe something will jump out as not being quite right. I'd be interested to see under what conditions the code is being logged. Is it at idle, partial or full throttle.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I'm not really sure to be honest. Post the data and maybe something will jump out as not being quite right. I'd be interested to see under what conditions the code is being logged. Is it at idle, partial or full throttle.
Okay I will get that and post it. It's funny, the first time it happened I was going 70 MPH on the highway. The second time it happened upon startup. And the third time it was at idle in a parking lot after being ran for about 20 minutes. So it is kind of weird as to what is triggering it. I'll also note the first time was about a month ago. The last 2 were about a week apart.
 
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