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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I read the maintenance section of the owners manual twice. There is no required viscosity, only recommended: sections/pages = 8.7 & 8.8/579 & 580

*1 : For better fuel economy, it is recommended to use the engine oil of a viscosity grade SAE 5W-30 (API SM / ILSAC GF-4).

If the API service SM engine oil is not available in your country, you are able to use API service SL


Even the recommendations are rather lenient.*
 

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Not sure what the question is but use the 5w-30 based on where you live. Every car I have owned "recommended" a type of oil. I know there are some companies that "require" a certain type of oil but I have never owned one and can't tell you which makes did that.
 

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Almost all major synthetic blends meets these specs.
I've been to two dealers and both are using synthetic blend oil.
Go to your local dealer for oil changes if you're searching fo the right lubricants.
 

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5W40, the 40 I do not believe is recommended in any current Hyundai model. XW30 is the highest viscosity recommended I believe. the most recent oils are SN, SL is getting on in the oil formulation age scene.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)

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5W40, the 40 I do not believe is recommended in any current Hyundai model. XW30 is the highest viscosity recommended I believe. the most recent oils are SN, SL is getting on in the oil formulation age scene.
Given that the API Service Classification, eg SN, is a low minimum standard, compared to the performance of international oils, I'm surprised that anyone fails to use the latest classification - sounds like a complete false economy to do so.

Most modern engines, across most brands, are designed for -30 oil when warmed up - internal temperatures don't actually vary much by climate.
 

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I'd say it's pretty straight forward. If you love in the desert where it's 30 degrees all the time then you may want to use a thicker oil as it will protect better in such warm conditions but if you're area experiences all 4 seasons then thinner oil (5w30 or 0w40) for winter and 5w30 for summer. You *can* go a bit thicker like 5w40 for Sumer but I never have.

Usually I stick with 5w30 or 0w40 and I've NEVER had problems.
 

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I'd say it's pretty straight forward. If you live in the desert where it's 30 degrees all the time then you may want to use a thicker oil as it will protect better in such warm conditions but if you're area experiences all 4 seasons then thinner oil (5w30 or 0w40) for winter and 5w30 for summer. You *can* go a bit thicker like 5w40 for Sumer but I never have.

Usually I stick with 5w30 or 0w40 and I've NEVER had problems.
I understand using a thinner cold rating in cold/cool climates but the internal engine temperature, once warmed up, is the same in hot or cold climates - so just why do you need a different hot rating?
 

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Car gurus and those who care may opt to use thinner oil for winter start ups and thicker oil for summer running..... It makes sense to me and it's pretty straight forward. I really don't know or care for all the technical jargon or reasoning behind it all but what I will say is that using thinner oil in the winter and thicker oil in the summer makes sense. Don't forget that the engine temp is the temp of the COOLANT, not the oil. Also, don't forget that the oil goes through a turbo unit on the turbo models and therefore gets hotter than what you see on the telltale temp gauge.

Just because you see a constant temperature on the dash doesn't mean the oil is in that environment of consistent temperature. I wonder why there isn't a toggle button that allows you to toggle between oil temp and coolant temp. Not hard to do with these digital instrument clusters.
 

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I remember that logic from my early years - in those days of single grade mineral oils it was very important to use different viscosity in winter and summer because single grade took forever to circulate when cold. That started to change when multigrade mineral oils were introduced, Duckhams Q 20W-50, was the big seller in the UK and could be used all year round - but the viscosity improvers soon broke down with use effectively giving a SAE 20 single grade, so OCIs remained at 3,000 miles until part-synthetic and synthetic oils became standard.

But oil technology has moved on a long way since the '60s, as have engine technologies.

By the way, the reason you see a consistent temperature on the dash is because the temperature gauge is electronically "managed" to remain constant at coolant temperatures from 75 C to above 105C - using a ScanGauge through the OBD port shows that!
 

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By the way, the reason you see a consistent temperature on the dash is because the temperature gauge is electronically "managed" to remain constant at coolant temperatures from 75 C to above 105C - using a ScanGauge through the OBD port shows that!
Very interesting.

Is this true for the 2013 SFS - did you test that also or your own car?
 

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The ScanGuage II is a great little tool. I does a better job of calculating the Distance Till Empty, actual current fuel economy, average fuel economy and has some codes now for the 2012 and up Hyundai's Motor Oil Temp and I think Trans Oil Temp.

And only 1/3rd the cost of the Dash Daq.

TCADS
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
From SHELL, today:

Thank you for your recent inquiry and supporting Shell products,

In response to your inquiry, although other current late model Hyundai, turbo equipped vehicles, specify SAE 5W-30/5W-40, we do not recommend Shell ROTELLA T6 5W-40 for the Santa Fe Sport 2.0T. Hyundai Motors USA and Shell Oil, recommend either SAE 5W-30 or 10W-30 only. Conversely, you are free to use SAE 10W-30 Shell ROTELLA T5 synthetic blend. Other recommended oils are Quaker State Advanced Durability or Quaker State Ultimate Durability, in 5W30 or 10W30.

ED
SHELL Oil


From HyundaiUSA:

...using a 5W-40 weight oil in the Santa Fe Sport 2.0T could void the factory warranty should any engine or emissions problem occur during the warranty period. Hyundai USA strongly recommends the use of recommended viscosity oils found in your owners manual...


SH*T !!
 

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What oil to use?

From SHELL, today:

Thank you for your recent inquiry and supporting Shell products,

In response to your inquiry, although other current late model Hyundai, turbo equipped vehicles, specify SAE 5W-30/5W-40, we do not recommend Shell ROTELLA T6 5W-40 for the Santa Fe Sport 2.0T. Hyundai Motors USA and Shell Oil, recommend either SAE 5W-30 or 10W-30 only. Conversely, you are free to use SAE 10W-30 Shell ROTELLA T5 synthetic blend. Other recommended oils are Quaker State Advanced Durability or Quaker State Ultimate Durability, in 5W30 or 10W30.

ED
SHELL Oil


From HyundaiUSA:

...using a 5W-40 weight oil in the Santa Fe Sport 2.0T could void the factory warranty should any engine or emissions problem occur during the warranty period. Hyundai USA strongly recommends the use of recommended viscosity oils found in your owners manual...
As noted above, USE the recommended oils!

If you think that the dealers purchase better quality oils, think again! They will purchase the cheapest oil in the biggest quantities that meets minimum standards set by the engine manufacture.

Our previous vehicle was 2005 VW Jetta TDI. The only oil that was warranted for use in that PD100 motor was 505.01 spec. You can not purchase this oil at any other location than at a VW/Audi dealer or a specialty oil dealer. I did all of my own oil changes at 16K Km (recommended oil change interval) and only did one through the oil bung in the oil pan up to 222k Km. when it was struck and totaled off. :(:(

Up here in the North, many if not most of the new vehicles say to use only 5W-20 oil! This is help with fuel economy and to make sure that the oil will flow when it gets colder up here.

For those that live South of the 48th, we do get many days in the Autumn, Winter & Spring, where the thermometer may start the day at <= 40 C or F. Plus the wind chill factor!

0W-20 or 0W-30 are great and sought out up here!!
 
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