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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hello All - I have been trying to figure out source of a major motor oil leak on my 2.7 engine. Leaks a quart in 10 miles or so. Valley area below plenum is dry. Cam covers on both banks are dry all the way around. Air turbulence from fan and serpentine assembly distributes oil all over front area of engine when vehicle is driven, so tough to figure out where the leak is. I have verified no leakage from oil filter, and I put a brand new oil pressure sending unit on (next to oil filter) Looking things over under hood while idling doesn't do it.. Still not obvious at all where the leak is from. Thinking you guys have probably seen this topic lots of times on here, but I could not seem to figure out how to do a search for prior postings.. Would sure appreciate any insight you may have, and I will certainly follow up on here when I finally identify source of this leakage on my car,, Thanks everyone
 

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Hello All - I have been trying to figure out source of a major motor oil leak on my 2.7 engine. Leaks a quart in 10 miles or so. Valley area below plenum is dry. Cam covers on both banks are dry all the way around. Air turbulence from fan and serpentine assembly distributes oil all over front area of engine when vehicle is driven, so tough to figure out where the leak is. I have verified no leakage from oil filter, and I put a brand new oil pressure sending unit on (next to oil filter) Looking things over under hood while idling doesn't do it.. Still not obvious at all where the leak is from. Thinking you guys have probably seen this topic lots of times on here, but I could not seem to figure out how to do a search for prior postings.. Would sure appreciate any insight you may have, and I will certainly follow up on here when I finally identify source of this leakage on my car,, Thanks everyone
Go to the car wash and rinse off the oil. Start it up and watch. Unplug the fan so it don't go flying everywhere and you should be able to find the source.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Go to the car wash and rinse off the oil. Start it up and watch. Unplug the fan so it don't go flying everywhere and you should be able to find the source.
Thanks for the good idea GRC, I don't want to overheat this great little engine of course, but unplugging fans during a brief "fast idle" session won't hurt anything, long as I shut it down before engine temp gets out of hand.. I'll get somebody to hold throttle (rpms) for me while I look things over from underneath and through wheel well area. Gotta be some way to see what is going on with this thing. Will be back later to let you know..
 

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I think that you can also get a dye to add to the oil to help better see where it is coming from. They sell it at many auto parts stores.
 

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Thanks for the good idea GRC, I don't want to overheat this great little engine of course, but unplugging fans during a brief "fast idle" session won't hurt anything, long as I shut it down before engine temp gets out of hand.. I'll get somebody to hold throttle (rpms) for me while I look things over from underneath and through wheel well area. Gotta be some way to see what is going on with this thing. Will be back later to let you know..
Just let it idle and check. With a leak that bad should be easy enough without revving it up.
 
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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Just let it idle and check. With a leak that bad should be easy enough without revving it up.
Just examining under hood while idling engine does not reveal the source of this particular leak. Guess I should have emphasized more clearly in my original thread starter on this. Seems more RPMs are needed to build enough oil pressure, then sure enough the leak starts showing up. But oil has a way of dripping down along components (and behind things) to a lower point on the car before it drips finally to the ground. As a result, pin pointing where the leak is at can be less than obvious.
I put the car on a hoist with engine RPMs steady at about 2000. Three mechanics looking things over with a good light, everyone reached same conclusion as I had : Valve covers were bone dry. No leak there. Oil leak was definitely not from cam seal (behind the belt sprockets) but it was leaking from somewhere high up enough to drench my alternator with oil.
They said they would have to disassemble a few items to see what is behind them, otherwise no way to identify exact point of leakage. So I took the car home, going to remove serpentine belt, idler pulleys and tensioner for starters, then probably the three plastic covers for timing belt enclosure. Hoping that will provide me a clear view of the leak. In the exploded view of the parts catalog, it shows four bolts which have rubber seals (they look more like a grommet then anything else.) Don't know if engine oil pressure is present behind those seals, but I would not be surprised.. The four bolts go through the plastic enclosure for the timing belt. There is no oil leaking inside the enclosure (on the timing belt) but perhaps the leak is actually behind that black cover...That would be up high enough to drench my alternator, if so. Will keep you guys posted what I find out over the weekend..
 

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Just examining under hood while idling engine does not reveal the source of this particular leak. Guess I should have emphasized more clearly in my original thread starter on this. Seems more RPMs are needed to build enough oil pressure, then sure enough the leak starts showing up. But oil has a way of dripping down along components (and behind things) to a lower point on the car before it drips finally to the ground. As a result, pin pointing where the leak is at can be less than obvious.
I put the car on a hoist with engine RPMs steady at about 2000. Three mechanics looking things over with a good light, everyone reached same conclusion as I had : Valve covers were bone dry. No leak there. Oil leak was definitely not from cam seal (behind the belt sprockets) but it was leaking from somewhere high up enough to drench my alternator with oil.
Will it leak immediately when started cold? If not, you probably are dealing with a crack in the block of corner of the head. The crack will expand as the engine warms and then the leak follows.
How many miles?
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Will it leak immediately when started cold? If not, you probably are dealing with a crack in the block of corner of the head. The crack will expand as the engine warms and then the leak follows.
How many miles?
151 K on the car, but it runs sweet as 50 K..
The leak will start showing up just as soon as the car is driven, just a matter of sufficient RPMs.
I searched online and found references to people having had oil leak issues around timing belt cover on these cars. So at this point I think that would be a good place for me to take a close look. Thanks for your input though GRC
 

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151 K on the car, but it runs sweet as 50 K..
The leak will start showing up just as soon as the car is driven, just a matter of sufficient RPMs.
I searched online and found references to people having had oil leak issues around timing belt cover on these cars. So at this point I think that would be a good place for me to take a close look. Thanks for your input though GRC
I would think that thing would have jumped time if it were in the timing cover. That's a lot of oil and the belt would be soaked. They don't do well with oil on them especially that much.
 

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Make sure the PCV system is working properly, especially the PCV valve is getting vacuum.
I once saw an engine (1976 Chevy straight six) with a clogged PCV vacuum port.
Due to some blow-by, the crankcase would get pressurized only when the engine was under load, and oil was coming out all over.
 

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Make sure the PCV system is working properly, especially the PCV valve is getting vacuum.
I once saw an engine (1976 Chevy straight six) with a clogged PCV vacuum port.
Due to some blow-by, the crankcase would get pressurized only when the engine was under load, and oil was coming out all over.
That's a good point but I would think it would be leaking under the valve covers as well. Maybe not gushing but not 'bone dry'.
I think it's a cracked block or head.
 
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The 2.7 engines are known for leaking around cam cover gaskets after about ten years or 80K miles. I've had two of them and the first had the gaskets replaced and the second needs them replaced now. Don't be surprised if that's the source of your oil loss.
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Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
I would think that thing would have jumped time if it were in the timing cover. That's a lot of oil and the belt would be soaked. They don't do well with oil on them especially that much.
Went in and pulled serpentine, idler, tensioner, and black plastic covers over timing belt. verified for sure, absolutely no leaks from camshaft seals. Also made sure nothing leaking from front of heads where they attach to block.
While I was at it, I replaced the seals where the four small bolts attach rear portion of timing belt compartment to front of engine. The seals (actually grommets) were only a few bucks at local dealer, so I figured what the heck.
The good news is the leak has nothing to do with any cracked block or timing belt issues. The bad news (for me at least) is it looks like my oil leak seems to have something to do with the upper oil pan. Only way to really be sure is to drop the pan, the way things look.
Since I have to remove some components to get in there to investigate, I might as well just order a new set of oil pan gaskets, and figure on dropping the oil pan assembly out of there, the way things look.
At this point, my next question is (for the veteran Hyundai wrenches) do these Hyundai vehicles sometimes have a problem with oil pans rusting out ? Mine is 10 years old now, and I have seen cars with cast aluminum oil pans have rust issues before. As absurd as it may sound..
PCV valve is new, no issues there by the way..
 

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Went in and pulled serpentine, idler, tensioner, and black plastic covers over timing belt. verified for sure, absolutely no leaks from camshaft seals. Also made sure nothing leaking from front of heads where they attach to block.
While I was at it, I replaced the seals where the four small bolts attach rear portion of timing belt compartment to front of engine. The seals (actually grommets) were only a few bucks at local dealer, so I figured what the heck.
The good news is the leak has nothing to do with any cracked block or timing belt issues. The bad news (for me at least) is it looks like my oil leak seems to have something to do with the upper oil pan. Only wak to really be sure is to drop the pan, the way things look.
Since I have to remove some components to get in there to investigate, I might as well just order a new set of oil pan gaskets, and figure on dropping the oil pan assembly out of there, the way things look.
A quart in 40 miles is an awful lot from even bad pan gaskets sealing. I can't remember....did this start slowly or all of a sudden?
 
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Discussion Starter #16
Make sure the PCV system is working properly, especially the PCV valve is getting vacuum.
I once saw an engine (1976 Chevy straight six) with a clogged PCV vacuum port.
Due to some blow-by, the crankcase would get pressurized only when the engine was under load, and oil was coming out all over.
Good insight, thanks, but PCV valve is new and system seems to work well on my car
 

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Discussion Starter #17
The 2.7 engines are known for leaking around cam cover gaskets after about ten years or 80K miles. I've had two of them and the first had the gaskets replaced and the second needs them replaced now. Don't be surprised if that's the source of your oil loss.
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Check very closely for assigns of leak around cam covers, everything is totally dry all the way around..
 

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Does the oil filter screw on to side of engine,, or does it mount up - down at corner of block ??


Seen a 2.7 leak where oil pressure switch install to port,, the casting craked where switch install, I suspect somebody replace and made too tight (pipe threads is taper),,

That section of aluminum is rough $400 I think it was,, 2 o-ring on rail to seal oil passages,, and the gasket material is RTV for pan and upper to block
 

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Discussion Starter #20 (Edited)
Does the oil filter screw on to side of engine,, or does it mount up - down at corner of block ??


Seen a 2.7 leak where oil pressure switch install to port,, the casting craked where switch install, I suspect somebody replace and made too tight (pipe threads is taper),,

That section of aluminum is rough $400 I think it was,, 2 o-ring on rail to seal oil passages,, and the gasket material is RTV for pan and upper to block
I put new oil pressure switch in early on when this leak started, but threads not damaged or leaking there. Very easy to see that area. Oil filter screws in vertically at front corner of engine close to A/C compressor and alternator.
So the factory used just RTV for sealing surface upper oil pan to engine block ? I find there are gaskets available for this application at my parts suppliers, getting ready to go ahead and buy a Fel Pro if I do drop the pan.. Am wondering how common is it for these 2.7 engines to leak where upper pan bolts to block ? ( on the 2008 vintage like mine)
Seems like just relying on RTV alone (If that is what the factory did?) might be a bad idea.. If there was no demand for an actual gasket for the 2.7 companies like Fel Pro would probably not be marketing gaskets for that application ?
 
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