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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So, my car has definitely seen better days.

It now has over 400k.

I have put quite a bit of work into it myself. 1/2 of front end (other half coming). rear shocks. exhaust repairs. valve cover seals. timing belt. brakes. fluid flushes. heater assembly. spark plugs. and so on.

Keeping this thing running has been both challenging and quite the initiation to mechanics.

So, I could really use a hand with two things.

1. Suggestions as to what might be up with my engine.

2. How to repair (or temporarily patch) the current problem.


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Recent history
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I have been burning some oil. I need to top it off every few weeks. (I presently suspect piston rings or valve seals.)

  • changed the spark plugs and noticed oil on the air intake manifold
  • changed PCV valve. it was gummed up despite being only 12-18 months old.

Car ran much more smoothly with better power. I'm still wondering about the oil on the manifold.

Suddenly, I'm leaking oil, not just burning it.

Crankshaft oil seal. (or so I think)

Replaced it. Old one appeared to have some damage on the inner ring (but I can say for sure if that wasn't just due to my removing it)

Before closing everything back up and replacing the serpentine belt parts, I run the car for a few minutes a couple of times.

Turns out I am still leaking oil and it is coming from an engine cover plate (I think) which I cannot seem to find online.

In the photos, look on the engine block, dead center of the two belts and you'll see a chipped part revealing a gasket.


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Automotive tire Gear Bicycle part Rim Tread



This chip occurred the last time I ran the engine. The fragment was still sitting there.

So, fast forward to the present and our two questions (now in reverse order! :) )

1. How to repair (or temporarily patch) the current problem.

(Like what is this part called anyways? Can I seal it temporarily from the outside? How big is the repair job and do you have any tips?)

2. Suggestions as to what might be up with my engine.

(Shall I bury this beast?)
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Okay, so it's the oil pump! Looking into the repair right now.

I'd still love any suggestions concerning this engine. :)
 

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Make sure the vacuum port and hose to the PCV valve aren't clogged.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
So. the oil pump replacement looks to be a fairly involved job. Fortunately, it's winter and there is no garage. ;)

The pump may actually be fine and just the seal compromised. However, given the chip in the housing, plus zero knowledge concerning the age of the existing pump (possibly original), plus all the work required just to get to it, I will be straight up replacing it.

Here's a good video, if anyone else comes looking for this information -

For the next person taking on this job, these doesn't seem to be good room to work around the exhaust. Plus, it gets in the way of the upper pan removal. (I disconnected the exhaust at the two places shown in the video, then removed rubber hangers heading back and dropped the whole thing.)
 

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Looks to me like the broken part is just a threaded part of the casting, probably only there to bolt the center of the timing cover on. My guess is that it was broken when someone replaced the timing cover in the past with too long of a screw. I would suggest getting some oil dye and uv glasses and check for leaks before diving into that big of a project. Wouldn't that just piss you off to do all that work then find out the cam seals are leaking?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
lobuc, thank you.

i see that i really wasn't clear about the photos or about the circumstances of that moment.

so, i had suspected the crankshaft seal faulty because it appeared to be the source of the leak. oil pooled there, actually dripped from the crankshaft (and was also tracked everywhere else the belts could take it and spray it, of course).

i cleaned everything up (so to speak) and replaced the crankshaft seal. ran it. the seal held. ran it a bit more. saw a fresh drip. looked closer. noticed a bead of oil sitting on that crack, plus the drip continuing below.

i didn't grab the camera immediately. the photos came a bit later.

and because this oil is so clean, plus the drip isn't fresh, it really isn't obvious to see.

enlarge the second photo and look underneath that cracked bit. you'll see oil (shiny) but in that area only. there is no appearance of oil (shiny) coming in from above or from the sides.

the job is still underway.

next step will involve RTV. slight delay for temperature (it's been minus 20 celsius). tomorrow promises to be the day i need.

also, i came across this while looking at things...

i have never seen any of these engine parts before, so i cannot tell if this is wrong or right, but it sure looks wrong to me, but it somehow also looks very intentional, manufactured bent, not broken. and i can't seem to find this gasket online to compare, so someone please school me on this...

what's the deal with this [starter, but really much larger] gasket? and why does it have such attitude, being all bent back like that? it definitely touches every flywheel bolt as they pass underneath and the bolts will actually get stopped in backward motion by this thing, that's how angled down it is. oh, that can't be good. it is there to help set timing, right? or maybe, it is to protect the engine from backward rotation? that might make sense, right? gee. i bet it makes an awful ruckus. how come i didn't ever notice that sound before or is that what i consider normal sound?

is this actually broken?

can i just cut it out? looks like it will still seal at the bell housing, and it is already sharing space with the flywheel, so doesn't look like separation is critical.


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Thanks! 👉
 

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I call it a starter locator or shim plate the part you can see is a small part of a much larger plate. It's needed for proper alignment of the starter. I would recommend a new or better condition used one if you ever separate the engine/tranny. You might be able to just bend it back in shape and tack weld the crack to get by for now.
 
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