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Discussion Starter #1
Hello. I’ve been in a frustrating battle with my 2015 2.0. Noticed oil was leaking from drain plug. Changed it and installed a new washer. Threads looked fine but it still leaked. Ordered OEM washers thinking the one I got from advance auto was incorrect. Changed it, still leaked. Car only has 40,000 miles, so I took it to a dealer. They told me the bolt was “loose” and the washer was on backwards (load of crap). Well low and behold, about a week later, I check again and it’s leaking. Installed a new drain plug and saw there one or two of the threads on the old one were flat. Drove it around the block and there’s still a little leak! Idk what else to do! Last thing I can think of are the threads in the pan but the new bolt tightened up fine and didn’t feel stripped at all. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.
 

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Look closely at the surface of the oil pan drain hole that mates to the plug...is it smooth or does it have some irregularity to it. I have heard of people distorting the pan by over-torquing the drain bolt. You could install a drain valve (with RTV sealer) and be done with it!
 

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Replace the oil pan or use an oversized drainplug.

To avoid this from happening again, use a new washergasket every time and invest in a quality torque wrench.
 

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I actually have a similar issue with our '14 SFS. Each time I change the oil, tighten to factory spec, and still have a small drip until I tighten a tiny bit over spec. My Sonata, absolutely no issues.

I also got some new crush washers and they also do not have a specific pan side.

Next oil change, going to inspect plug, threads, try new washers... Wondering if it's the pan drain bolt surface that's not flush hence why it doesn't seal properly.

Have you tried to tighten a smidge more to see if leak stops? Talked to dealer? I haven't; don't frequent the dealer much...

Sent from my SM-G930P using Tapatalk
 

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If you install a Fumoto valve, the washer they come with is more of a fiber washer so it's much softer than the allow one the dealers use.
Installing a drain valve may just do the trick.
 

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I went to a brand name oil change place
They over tightened the drain plug
It leaks. Could have re-tapped and used a heli-coil.
Or use an over sized plug.
Didn't.

What I decided to do for now, was to do my own oil changes and use Teflon tape.
Good for now. Waiting for the day I will get rid of this rust bucket
 

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Teflon tape on a drain plug? I’m surprised no one responded yet and scolded you .

Sometimes, you gotto do whatever to get the job done especially when someone else makes a costly mistake like that.

There is petroleum safe Teflon tape out there so I don’t see any issues with what you’re doing as long as you’re not going hog wild tightening it.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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I have commented before that I do not like the term "crush washer" for what Hyundai and others use. The Hyundai washer is a soft aluminum washer and if you tighten it enough, yeah, I guess you could crush it. For years GM and others used a true crush washer, and it may help with your issue.

https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/41DVpC-Lv0L._SX425_.jpg

this is for a Subaru, but you get the idea. Also, there are drain plugs made with a small magnet in the end, and a neoprene gasket. That should definitely fix the problem.

https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/411yZdn2yFL._SL500_AC_SS350_.jpg

or

https://shop.advanceautoparts.com/w...ge//797/large/17190144_nda_65274_pri_larg.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for all of your responses. As a last ditch effort, I applied some red RTV around the washer. Seems to be working at the moment. Anyone had any luck using this method? I know it seems like shady work but I don't see a problem with it considering it's high temp silicone (650 degrees F). Really don't want to throw money at a new pan and I'm a little hesitant about cutting new threads.
 

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Using a small amount of sealer at the flange of the drain bolt or even on the very last couple of threads is not bad if it takes care of your leak but I would search around for a better washer and try that. im not sure of the threaded bolt size (17mm head) but places like Grainger have flange gaskets in all sizes and material Id look for something firm enough to not break up under the correct torque of the bolt but will compress here is a link to these types of washers (viton is a harder type of rubber that is used in some of these and is oil and fuel resistant and temp range from 0 to degrees or a nylon or copper type material may work)

https://www.grainger.com/category/s...&searchRedirect=1/2"+flange+gasket&sst=subset

https://www.grainger.com/category/w...searchRedirect=copper+crush+washer&sst=subset
 

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If your drainplug leaks, YOU, or your dealer/quicklube, ARE DOING SOMETHING WRONG THAT CAUSED IT.

If a new stock sized properly torqued drainplug/washer doesn't stop the leak, then go oversized.

The oil thread pans are worn out, use a self-tapping slightly +1 oversized drain plug:
https://www.dormanproducts.com/p-133-090-0821.aspx
https://www.dormanproducts.com/p-12141-65217.aspx

Offered in doubleoversized too for real wannabe mechanics:
https://www.dormanproducts.com/p-54542-090-183.aspx

And in triple for owners that use the dealer or quicklubes:
https://www.dormanproducts.com/p-52671-65409.aspx

So, if you are a cheapskate and can't afford a new washer or a torque wrench, learn how to use the above drain plugs. Most dealer & quicklube screwups can also be fixed with the above drainplugs. I've never needed to use more than a +1 oversized to fix hack work. The oversized plugs catch the remainder of the pan threads, clean them up, and tap it a tad oversized.

Other option.... install a new oil pan.
Another option... remove oil pan, weld it up, drill and retap for m14 size, reinstall
And another.... remove oil pan, drill/tap for next size up(m16 16mm but maybe need to go to an M18) ... reinstall with new drainplug.

Good selection of washers for the drainplug... I use soft metal copper or aluminum washers.
https://www.belmetric.com/drain-plugs-and-gaskets-c-11/

Tighten the oil filter to spec too. Don't want to strip its mounting bolt either.

Oil filter: 11.8 ~ 15.7 N.m (1.2 ~ 1.6 kgf.m, 8.7 ~ 11.6 lb-ft)

Oil pan drainplug: 34.3 ~ 44.1 N.m (3.5 ~ 4.5 kgf.m, 25.3 ~ 32.5 lb-ft)

A torque adapter for the ratchet will prevent future issues... works well for the 10ft/lb filter and 30ft/lb drainplug:
[ame]https://www.amazon.com/ACDelco-ARM602-3-Digital-Adapter-Audible/dp/B004VYUKTC[/ame]
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Update: Car broke down on me due to one of the catalytic converters blowing up. Had it at a dealer for a month. While it was there, I had them look at the leak again. They replace the washer and said “keep an eye on it”. Of course it starts to leak again... Took it to my local dealer and finally the service manager agreed to replace the pan. This car has been nothing but a headache. Hopefully this is the last of my problems for a while.
 

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Just to play nice with my factory warranty - I let my Hyundai dealer do the first oil change ... I did the 2nd oil change and here is what I found : First , only half of my 10mm panel screws underneath were installed (zig zag pattern) which indicated the service tech was lazy ! Next , the oil drain plg was so tight I had to use a breaker bar to loosen with my 3/8th drive / 17mm socket ! ... Never again will I let Hyundai change my oil - now I too have a slight leak and will feel around at next oil change to see if the oil pan surface near the drain plug is flat ...Otherwise it's off to find a flexible orange rubber gasket from an auto parts store or install a Fumoto oil drain valve .
 

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I'd go to the plastic washer too. Cheap and easy.


It's not the threads job to seal, the washer is there to seal. And it has to be both flat and scratch free surfaces on the pan and the bolt head flange. Something is warped or bent.


I just reuse the factory washer and flip it every time. If I have to use a tool to get it off then it's time for a new one. Easily get three or four changes out of one.


And torque values are not always the holy grail of way to get the job done. Meaning if you relay solely on the torque wrench values then you never know how far you can go.



I just give it two ugs and done!
 

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One of the first things I do on all my cars.

Find out the thread size.

Either...

(1) Go buy a cheap replacement oil drain plug, find someone with even the cheapest of lathes, supply them with a standard sized o-ring and have them cut a groove in the flange of the bolt to hold the o-ring.

or

(2) Purchase a factory drain bolt from another auto manufacturer that already comes with an o-ring instead of a washer.




You'll never ever have to worry about drips or replacing washers ever again.

In your case, walk into your local Honda dealer and purchase a drain plug for an '05-'10 Odyssey...

Look at it when they hand it to you.

If it has a built-in o-ring.....

Pay the $6.00 - $12.00.



Enjoy the rest of your life. :smile:

(I have access to a lathe, and I'm surprised how some manufactures do this and yet others don't)

How much $$$ can they possibly save?
 

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GM used one on the 4.3L V6 that had both the o-ring and a magnet in the tip. Didn't leak, and you could check at every oil change for metal on the magnet. Not a cheap solution, but very effective.
 

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The Buick has a neoprene washer with 3 concentric, o-ring like seals.
 
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