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2020 Santa Fe Limited 2.0T Awd
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Discussion Starter #181
My travel time to work is typical 30-45mins, 75% of that is on hwy but half of that is slow speed with congestion. Similar dilution level in winter and summer, although there is 0.25L less in summer than in winter but I only measured that once and not sure if it is consistent. As far as burning the fuel off when engine heats up + longer drive, it is not happening on my 2.0T.
Yep. Same here. Long highway drives hasn't really done much to burn off excess fuel. I did 1.5 hour highway drive yesterday and levels are still about the same.
 

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2020 Santa Fe Limited 2.0T Awd
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Discussion Starter #183 (Edited)
This person profess he took the 2020 Santa Fe 2.0 Turbo to the dealer. These engine issues are taken seriously at Hyundai.
These engine issues are taken seriously? When I brought up the issue a year ago, they pretty much told me that the oil was still within capacity and the dipstick was only for approximation (see the picture from the service report below) - eerily similar to what they are alleging with the new 2.5 engine in how Hyundai allegedly redesigned the dipstick to hide a potential issue. Obviously that it still hearsay at this point. But fascinating.
454848


They never looked deeply into the issue, which is why I started sending off oil samples to be analyzed.
 

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Your statements shows that you are a complete moron. I thought Tesla fan boys were bad. They are nothing compared to red cap wearing Hyundai fan boys like you. The foolishness is astounding.
Relative compression test of each cylinder using diagnositic tool o-scope have been available for over 10 yrs. The senior mechanics have performed this test for decades without oil school sparkplug hole compression testers.
 

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My 2004 Chevrolet Colorado 3.5 does not have a PCV.
General Motors Parts Catalog show picture of PVC location for PN 1255594 on your 2004 Cheverolet Colorado 3.5.

PVC have been a requirement by Federal Law since 1960’s. It was one of the first emission control devices. Car manufacturers adopted this technology because pulling a partial vacuum increased horse power Too.
 

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Will that Amazon fluid extractor take out more than two quarts of oil? What is the make & model of that extractor?
Thanks!
It can take out almost all of the 5 quarts.
I figure 2 quarts is good for me because we drive so little kms in a month. Its 90% city driving.

Its a cheap 30buck yellow model i bought last year that connects to the cars battery.

Works well. I always charge the AGM battery after to top it up.
 

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Relative compression test of each cylinder using diagnositic tool o-scope have been available for over 10 yrs. The senior mechanics have performed this test for decades without oil school sparkplug hole compression testers.
ALL DI engines leak fuel into the crank and turbo DI engines do it even more, especially when cold.

Please Google low tension piston rings. A compression test has nothing to do with fuel getting into the crank, nothing, in this situation.ĺ

Fuel getting past cold rings, on cold engine , when the ecu dumps extra fuel in order to get the cats up to operating temp as fast as possible, with short trip cold weather driving.

I can guess that I have had almost 1 quart of fuel in my engine, given our driving habits.
Sometimes it is so cold the engine won't reach operating temperature before it is shut down again, and the process starts again in an hour. No turbo DI engine can fight this, especially with low tension rings.
 

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This person profess he took the 2020 Santa Fe 2.0 Turbo to the dealer. These engine issues are taken seriously at Hyundai. A Senior Mechanic with factory Diagnostic and Service tool most likely scanned the engine computer.

1). Dealer level scan tools can determine all cylinders compressions. It is able to compare the data with acceptable and normal operations, as well as compare cylinder to cylinder. This compression analysis can be performed without removing the sparkplugs and perform an old school compression test.

2). The dealer scan tool and with service diagnostic activated can overlay crank position (+- 0.1% angle accuracy), spark timing, fuel injector timing, knock sensor, O2 sensor, and determine which cylinder is firing and which cylinder is down on power by the rotation angle of the running engine.

There is no way an engine which leaks 1 cup of unburnt fuel into crankcase oil would pass these tests. The number of sensor failures to miss this catastrophic ignition and piston ring failures would not allow the engine to run.
Relative compression tests are not the exact same as a cylinder compression test.
Please do some more googling before you try to sound smart a prove a point that can't be proved.
 

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2019 Santa Fe Ultimate 2.0T HTRAC
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Without knowing much about engine and oil property. The following points (from this forum and from Google) seem reasonable.
1) DI is a pressurized system, it is expected to have fuel leaks pass the piston ring.
2) The terminology might not be correct here... fuel will not be burn when mixed with oil. But once the oil is saturated with x percentage of fuel, the extra fuel is burned while the engine is warm. IDK the theory behind this, but this supports the dip stick oil level behavior - large level increase initially then stabilizes afterward.
 

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That's a ridiculous amount overfull. The crank will start dipping in the oil and the car will loose a lot of power and blow smoke. Back to the dealer.
 

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That's a ridiculous amount overfull. The crank will start dipping in the oil and the car will loose a lot of power and blow smoke. Back to the dealer.
Most engines seem to tolerate 1 extra quart.......more than that and you can play the frothy game.
Not a good game.
 

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Some great points made about todays engine technology.
We live at 9200 feet in the mountains of Colorado. Cold environment.
Short trips to town, 7 miles one way.
This will test the 2.4 L in our Santa Fe for oil dilution.
 

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High altitude means reduced NA engine power.... requiring more gas pedal to move that asphyxiating vehicle. At 9200, you're losing ~1/4 of the engine power, or the equivalent of shrinking the engine by ~25-30% and effectively moving air/fuel comparable to a ~1.7-1.9L engine at sea-level. Big engine making little power burning little fuel(engine adapts A/F to o2 sensor readings).... pushed harder.... should hopefully reduce fuel diluting oil, but fuel diluting oil might also be exaggerated by short trips.

You don't need a pcv valve to vent a crankcase.

What an engine tolerates for overfill depends on the specific engine.. there is no such thing as 'most'.

1. It is not expected to have fuel leak past the rings. That would be bad engineering or excessive blowby compression lost from wear/tear and ineffective rings(crud/wear/carbon), and poor fuel spray pattern(cheap fuel and no injector cleaner usage). Avoid excessive short trips and get it all warmed up.
2. Oil is saturated from excessive short trips and driving like a snowflake. Fuel evaporates from the oil continuously. Some driving styles add more fuel than can be evaporated.

I don't use a scan tool for a compression test or leakdown test. Too many here don't have a clue.

I don't see the point of siphoning oil. If its that bad, change the oil and filter, and change the PCV valve regularly, like every 30k miles.

Octane is used for detonation control. In the winter, on an NA engine, you don't need as much octane as you would in a hot summer environment. If octane isn't sufficient, engine tuning will adjust any one or combination of cylinder pressure, timing, and fuel ratio to adapt, which could increase oil dilution from excessive fuel injected or not enough time for that fuel to burn or not enough heat to burn the fuel.

Idiocracy is alive in this thread. I thing we have too many clueless blabbering with each other above. Its laughable.

The wife is a 99% city driver and makes oil level and plenty of it. So, this properly engineering and running engine needs me to take it on 1 of my highway commutes every couple weeks to remove that pint-quart of fuel... Highways here run 80mph+ in a 70mph zone and 1 trip drops the oil level drastically and it isn't oil consumption.

I'd wager the negligent owners, short trippers, cheap fuel or oil users, and hypermilers... will have more issues than someone that overmaintains the vehicle with quality fuel/lubes and drives with some enthusiasm.
 
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It can take out almost all of the 5 quarts.
I figure 2 quarts is good for me because we drive so little kms in a month. Its 90% city driving.

Its a cheap 30buck yellow model i bought last year that connects to the cars battery.

Works well. I always charge the AGM battery after to top it up.
Fred
Does your unit have a name on it? Do you recall where it was purchased?
 

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High altitude means reduced NA engine power.... requiring more gas pedal to move that asphyxiating vehicle. At 9200, you're losing ~1/4 of the engine power, or the equivalent of shrinking the engine by ~25-30% and effectively moving air/fuel comparable to a ~1.7-1.9L engine at sea-level. Big engine making little power burning little fuel(engine adapts A/F to o2 sensor readings).... pushed harder.... should hopefully reduce fuel diluting oil, but fuel diluting oil might also be exaggerated by short trips.

You don't need a pcv valve to vent a crankcase.

What an engine tolerates for overfill depends on the specific engine.. there is no such thing as 'most'.

1. It is not expected to have fuel leak past the rings. That would be bad engineering or excessive blowby compression lost from wear/tear and ineffective rings(crud/wear/carbon), and poor fuel spray pattern(cheap fuel and no injector cleaner usage). Avoid excessive short trips and get it all warmed up.
2. Oil is saturated from excessive short trips and driving like a snowflake. Fuel evaporates from the oil continuously. Some driving styles add more fuel than can be evaporated.

I don't use a scan tool for a compression test or leakdown test. Too many here don't have a clue.

I don't see the point of siphoning oil. If its that bad, change the oil and filter, and change the PCV valve regularly, like every 30k miles.

Octane is used for detonation control. In the winter, on an NA engine, you don't need as much octane as you would in a hot summer environment. If octane isn't sufficient, engine tuning will adjust any one or combination of cylinder pressure, timing, and fuel ratio to adapt, which could increase oil dilution from excessive fuel injected or not enough time for that fuel to burn or not enough heat to burn the fuel.

Idiocracy is alive in this thread. I thing we have too many clueless blabbering with each other above. Its laughable.

The wife is a 99% city driver and makes oil level and plenty of it. So, this properly engineering and running engine needs me to take it on 1 of my highway commutes every couple weeks to remove that pint-quart of fuel... Highways here run 80mph+ in a 70mph zone and 1 trip drops the oil level drastically and it isn't oil consumption.

I'd wager the negligent owners, short trippers, cheap fuel or oil users, and hypermilers... will have more issues than someone that overmaintains the vehicle with quality fuel/lubes and drives with some enthusiasm.
Every COLD engine will leak fuel past the rings....I'm talking winter cold. -15 to 25 celcius.
I short trip all the time....j would rather remove and add good new oil every month or two.
Its much easier than getting underneath.

Really its down to driving style and environment.
At -25 no amount of speeding driving will burn off the fuel that accumulated.

In regards to your octane comment.
Here 87 is 10% ethanol. The 91 is ethanol free.

Speaking to other drivers they noticed a reduced amount of fuel in their oil using 91.
I have not tried it.

Some of us can not avoid excessive short trips because of where we live and our lifestyles.
 

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Fraudster.

Try doing the math. The amount of unburnt fuel is nearly 5 gallon to travel 666 miles using 33 gallon of fuel. The engineering, combustion chemistry and leak down cannot support the mono-directional flow pass the piston rings.

Most people report high oil consumption when piston rings wear out. This fraudster is reporting fuel from 1/14.8 AF flooding into his crankcase increasing the oil and causing the oil to thin.

Fraud
5% of 5 quarts is 250mls of unburnt fuel in the crankcase.
Not sure where your 5 gallons comes from...........
 

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General Motors Parts Catalog show picture of PVC location for PN 1255594 on your 2004 Chevrolet Colorado 3.5.

PVC have been a requirement by Federal Law since 1960’s. It was one of the first emission control devices. Car manufacturers adopted this technology because pulling a partial vacuum increased horse power Too.
REPEAT
Not sure where you got that part number from. Care to show me a web-link to that part number?
There is no PCV valve for the 2004 Chevrolet Colorado 3.5 .... simply a hose running from the valve cover to the resonator box.

Genuinegmparts.com says..... Oops! We couldn't find any results for PN 1255594
 
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