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Hyundai twin-charged 1.8L GDCI gas engine expected to be more efficient than 2.0L diesel - Autoblog

You can read the whole article in the link above but essentially this will be an engine with both a turbocharger and a supercharger giving gasoline mpg similar to a diesel.

And the last paragraph of the article indicates it is likely to first appear in the 2015 Sonata............"This new GDCI engine is a joint development with the folks at Delphi, and while official production timing hasn't been released, Engineer says the company hopes to begin its in-car testing sometime next year. This engine was "always factored in production," according to Engineer, and will arrive in the "not too distant future" – likely in the next Sonata."
 

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I sure wouldn't want one over 100k miles. Sounds expensive to fix.
 

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I sure wouldn't want one over 100k miles. Sounds expensive to fix.
VW has been using this same type of engine in European models for 4 years. Reliability is right up there with their NA and turbo diesel engines. I believe the engine is only 1.4 liters in displacement but rivals their 1.8l models in power.

If they can deliver identical power with less rolling stock (ie smaller engine) then great. Because that means less weight, translating into higher HP/weight ratios. Along with better fuel economy.

Ill take that any day!
 

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So is this thing a diesel running on gasoline? This quote implies that:

"Gasoline is possibly the best fuel for diesel engines"

There are no obvious wires for spark plugs on the pictured engine.

I guess the sky is the limit on compression ratio if you only inject the fuel when it needs to ignite. With a super high compression ratio the air will get hot enough to ignite the gasoline without a spark plug.
 

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My brother in law has had the twin charge vw engine in his golf since it came out and he hasn't had any real issues with it.
 

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Wonder how the ride would be and if one can notice a smaller engine. Sure the engineers will say one thing, but let's see how it runs in real world. Not saying its going to be bad because I for one would love to try a engine of this technology.
 

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14.1 compression ratio!? It's gonna need premium for sure!
I don't know if premium is needed anymore. It was in the days when gas & air were mixed outside of the cylinder and sucked into the cylinder together. Compressing this mixture made it hotter, and if the compression ratio was too high it would get hot enough to ignite before the spark plug fired. This caused pre-ignition, aka knocking, pinging, etc. Premium gas burns more slowly that regular, minimizing the effects of pre-ingition.

With direct injection, only air is drawn into the cylinder. The injection of the fuel can be delayed until the last moment, eliminating the possibility of pre-ignition. If the compression is high enough, you could DEPEND on the self-ignition of the mixture and eliminate the spark plug and it's supporting components and software. Presto chango, a gasoline diesel. Or so it seems.
 

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This motor making it into the new Sonata is just a guessing game on Autoblog's part. I don't know how willing Hyundai would be to put the GDCI in the Sonata when it already has a hybrid model. I could certainly see this going into the Tucson and Elantras though.
 

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I think we'll see the 1.6T (from Veloster) and the 2.0T in the next Sonata. They're going to try to compete with the Fusion.
 

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I am thinking of getting a 2014 Passat sedan now that they have replaced the 2.5L 5-cylinder engine with the 1.8T turbo 4-cylinder. VW states the 1.8T runs on regular unleaded and can even use E15 fuel.

The 2.0T in the VW CC is premium fuel recommended, but not required. You could get away with mid-grade.

Actually, I run mid-grade in my 2.4L Sonata...it runs much better on 89 octane than 87 octane.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·

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I am thinking of getting a 2014 Passat sedan now that they have replaced the 2.5L 5-cylinder engine with the 1.8T turbo 4-cylinder. VW states the 1.8T runs on regular unleaded and can even use E15 fuel.

The 2.0T in the VW CC is premium fuel recommended, but not required. You could get away with mid-grade.

Actually, I run mid-grade in my 2.4L Sonata...it runs much better on 89 octane than 87 octane.
Good VW is giving up on the 2.5 in the Passat. I rented one for a week in CA in Sept and was unimpressed with the ride. Love VW in general but that engine in that car is a mismatch.
 

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VW has been using this same type of engine in European models for 4 years. Reliability is right up there with their NA and turbo diesel engines. I believe the engine is only 1.4 liters in displacement but rivals their 1.8l models in power.

If they can deliver identical power with less rolling stock (ie smaller engine) then great. Because that means less weight, translating into higher HP/weight ratios. Along with better fuel economy.

Ill take that any day!
Uhmm you are not quite correct. The 1.4L Twincharged is by far the least reliable engine you can find today. It's literally plagued with issues and has forced VW to withdraw it from their lineup.

Volkswagen 1.4TSI twincharger to be phased out: report - Photos (1/1) | CarAdvice

Who Killed The Twincharger? | The Truth About Cars
 

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Good Info But....

Uhmm you are not quite correct. The 1.4L Twincharged is by far the least reliable engine you can find today. It's literally plagued with issues and has forced VW to withdraw it from their lineup.

Volkswagen 1.4TSI twincharger to be phased out: report - Photos (1/1) | CarAdvice

Who Killed The Twincharger? | The Truth About Cars
So I read your links.

I stand corrected that VW withdrew it from their lineup. However, I found this link suggesting it may still be available in Singapore?

The TSI TwinCharger Motor

Seems like, due to complexities with the supercharger/turbo charger setup and cost to produce it, they stopped producing it. I can respect the business decision.

Ive seen/found nothing against the engine's performance or reliability. "Least reliable" is an overstatement to say the least--I can think of far more engines both current and historical that are worse than this one.

Unfortunately, new technology always has teething problems. Either due to unforeseen engineering issues or inability to drive costs down through economies of scale. I can probably find articles lamenting many of the technologies in today's cars. However, 3 years of R&D can mean worlds of difference between this motor and whatever may be under the hood of the LF.

For example, compare the 2.4l GDI to older VW GDI engines.

Or the EPS system on GM cars of the early 2000's.

Or the digital dashboards that were all the rage back in the early 1990's.

Cars have grown up to have all of these technologies included in them that work quite well today.

Change is good. That's why we have the cars we have today vs what was "groundbreaking" back in 80's and 90's. Heck even what was considered revolutionary just 10 short years ago.

The alternative is to stick with current technology and hope that consumers don't notice. It worked out really well for the US car companies, right?
 

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So I read your links.

I stand corrected that VW withdrew it from their lineup. However, I found this link suggesting it may still be available in Singapore?

The TSI TwinCharger Motor

Seems like, due to complexities with the supercharger/turbo charger setup and cost to produce it, they stopped producing it. I can respect the business decision.

Ive seen/found nothing against the engine's performance or reliability. "Least reliable" is an overstatement to say the least--I can think of far more engines both current and historical that are worse than this one.

Unfortunately, new technology always has teething problems. Either due to unforeseen engineering issues or inability to drive costs down through economies of scale. I can probably find articles lamenting many of the technologies in today's cars. However, 3 years of R&D can mean worlds of difference between this motor and whatever may be under the hood of the LF.

For example, compare the 2.4l GDI to older VW GDI engines.

Or the EPS system on GM cars of the early 2000's.

Or the digital dashboards that were all the rage back in the early 1990's.

Cars have grown up to have all of these technologies included in them that work quite well today.

Change is good. That's why we have the cars we have today vs what was "groundbreaking" back in 80's and 90's. Heck even what was considered revolutionary just 10 short years ago.

The alternative is to stick with current technology and hope that consumers don't notice. It worked out really well for the US car companies, right?
No the issues related with the TwinCharged TSI engines were more in line with the motor self detonating LOL

But regarding automotive technology, sooner or later we will reach an equilibrium level. I mean look at the latest Nissan GTR NISMO, it does 0-100km/h in 2 seconds. That's like 1.7 seconds 0-60mph. Tech has come a long way but how much better is it gonna actually get for the average product? Example would be engine displacement. Sure you could cram big power from a small 2.0L engine. You can make 500hp if you want. But that's just not feasible is it. And it probably won't be feasible for a commercial application.
 
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