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Hey everyone. I am a mechanic for my job. I loved my wifes 2017 SF Ultimate and when it came time for me to go get a new car I went with a Santa Fe. I bought the car over the weekend and as soon as I drove off the lot I thought wow this car has some throttle map lag. Not turbo lag as I have seen discussed but the mapping of the throttle is slow. I though it might get better with a week of driving but it has not. Just to save some time I hooked up my scanner from work and I recorded how fast it takes her 2017 and my 2019 to go from 40% throttle on the pedal to 40% on the engine. Did the same for 100% and 10%. Let me just say that my 2019 takes twice as long as her car to reach any of those throttle settings. 2019 40% on the pedal took 1.2 seconds to slowly open the throttle body to the same %. Her car took .7 seconds.
Same thing everywhere. All the talk from the testers they are experiencing SLOW throttle mapping. I should have did my home work. But the car is mine now so I have to figure a way to get around this. If anyone on here experiences there 2019 SF to respond slow its because it is. But its not the engine or turbo that being slow. The throttle mapping is terrible and the rate at which the throttle body opens on the 2019 is slower.

So my first question is does anyone know of a Throttle controller that will work with the 2019-2020. 2018 and down wont work. 2019 and 2020 have a totally different throttle pedal than what was in the older cars. I saw someone say Hyundai needs to come out with a flash and they do. My wifes 2017 reacts way faster than my 2019. They fell short with the mapping of the "new" engine and the 8 speed. I have had lots of cars that were DBW and have messed with them all but this car from the factory is by far slow to put your throttle inputs from your foot to the actual engine. On the 2019 you can slam the throttle and release it with in a second and the car might try to give you 20% power. I need help....
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Yea sport is better. You have to really get past 30% throttle input before sport goes faster so still a big lag when you first hit the gas. And I would not drive the car a lot in sport it holds 3rd gear in some places way to long it wont bump up into 4th. I dont want to rev a new car all that much. I like the shift logic of comfort but want way more throttle speed. I have used Pedal Commander and Sprint booster in the the past and they have worked real good when you want to speed up pedal to throttle reaction. But did not see one listed for the 2019.
 

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I have a 2020 Limited with the 2.0T engine. I just got it so was being careful during the break in period. Today I hit the 1,000 mile mark and drove the car to work in sport mode, I arrived at the office with a big smile on my face. I 100% agree that in Smart mode and to a lesser extent Comfort mode there is throttle lag. Sport mode totally transforms the car, it is way more responsive with no lag. Put the transmission in manual mode and the car will rev match on downshifts.

TAZ69, seeing how you’re a mechanic, will I damage the transmission/engine if I drive in manual mode most of the time (that rev matching is way too addictive and fun).
 

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Nope driving it in manual wont hurt a thing. It is probably a little better. As you will bump the car up a gear like to 4th when you are doing 30 or 35 and it wont hang in 3rd the entire time. Manual mode is ok. Im coming from a Q50 and a tricked out 2017 Accord Touring v6. So this is just a little different.
 

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Thanks and let me know if you ever find a fix for the throttle lag. Hopefully Hyundai will come up with a software fix in the near future.
 

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Since Taz 69 is a mechanic I would think he would have test drove the heck out of the S.F. and should have noticed any lag. .... Anyway, I don't think Hyundai will make any changes because MPG is too important to them. Personally I'm very happy with the performance and after a year of driving, I have very few complaints. Mileage has been great at 28.3 mpg during this time (using gas purchased and mileage driven) on the 2.0T awd.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Xsolara you are correct. I should have drove it. I did not. I knew there was a interior refresh and they added a 8 speed automatic but since I have had my wife's in the family for over 2 years I walked in got the one off of the show room floor and just looked it over for any defects. First time I never drove a car I bought. So it is my fault. Changing the throttle mapping would have no affect on gas millage. Push a little gas go slow. Push a lot of gas go fast. Deadening the pedal that much just keeps (older folks) smooth and not jerky on the throttle. My mother in-law has a Ford Escape with this exact engine and it mapped almost 1:1 throttle to engine and it will smoke the tires at a dead stop with a stomp on the gas. These 2.T engine CAN build a lot of boost with these very small turbos at a low rpm. This car can make all 265tq at 1600 rpm if allowed. I will look deeper into it. Some with a 2020 say they have very little lag. I might just fo to the dealer next week and drive a 2020. IF they are different and changed it then Hyundai realized they had messed up and fixed it. If no change then hopefully a flash or someone will make a pedal commander for it.

Here is a video I found that might help explain what it does.

 

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Nice mod. If it is 1:1, some will complain too aggressive given the massive torque at low rpm. No matter what Hyundai does, there will be complains o_O
 

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Is it “have drove,” or “have driven?” The English language is under attack these days.

Regarding the question at hand, I have absolutely no problem with the way my ‘19 2.0 Ultimate FWD moves off the line. I also own a 3.8 Genesis and the SF is really not that much slower. Is one second really that big a deal?

Also, I think the SMART mode gives the smoothest and crispest shifts of the three options. Seems to me that folks may be shunning it because they think it’s the old folks gear. It isn’t.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I am sorry for the improper grammar. I cant edit yet as I do not have enough posts. 1 second is a big deal to me. And it slower than my wife's 2017. I was just posting my observation is all. I wanted to know if anyone knew of a pedal controller that would work. And if anyone has driven a 2020 to see if there is a difference. There are at least 3 or 4 threads before me discussing this. Its a personal thing if it bothers you or not. I'm not bashing anyone who finds it great. I'm asking advice or help from the ones who do feel there is a issue and I was just trying to explain its not a turbo lag problem but the throttle mapping one.
 

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I have the 2020, I find comfort or sport mode more responsive than smart mode. Smart mode does give better fuel economy to the tune of an additional 1 to 2 more mpg and was my preferred mode when I was breaking the engine in.

taz69 I test drive a 2019 with 5k miles on it, I did not notice any difference in throttle sensitivity to my 2020. Maybe the car is still learning your driving style and will adapt?
 

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No I am not drag racing my wife's car. I meant her throttle body reacts in half the time as what I found on mine. I jumped out of mine in to hers and was like her car responded to me a lot faster. That is what got me started on this. After watching things yesterday it can be 1.5 seconds for the engine to reach where I have the pedal at. Her 2017 reacts in half the time. So there is a big difference anyway between a 2017 and 2019. The 2019 takes twice as long to react is all.... Her car also has more tip in. Say you slow down and turn into a neighborhood. feather gas a little to get going at 20% on my 2019 pedal I get 12% on the engine. Her 2017 would give 18% on the engine. I understand that now that it is just the way it is.. I will try different drive modes. I will just try and change the way I drive. But this is just for knowledge there is a difference in the throttle programming from the 2017-2018 vs the 2019-2020. Its not turbo lag but Hyundai did slow the throttle to engine translation time down is all..
 

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No I am not drag racing my wife's car. I meant her throttle body reacts in half the time as what I found on mine. I jumped out of mine in to hers and was like her car responded to me a lot faster. That is what got me started on this. After watching things yesterday it can be 1.5 seconds for the engine to reach where I have the pedal at. Her 2017 reacts in half the time. So there is a big difference anyway between a 2017 and 2019. The 2019 takes twice as long to react is all.... Her car also has more tip in. Say you slow down and turn into a neighborhood. feather gas a little to get going at 20% on my 2019 pedal I get 12% on the engine. Her 2017 would give 18% on the engine. I understand that now that it is just the way it is.. I will try different drive modes. I will just try and change the way I drive. But this is just for knowledge there is a difference in the throttle programming from the 2017-2018 vs the 2019-2020. Its not turbo lag but Hyundai did slow the throttle to engine translation time down is all..
I agree that a little accommodation is in order. I’m going to assume that the new Santa Fe is also a bit heavier than the ‘13-‘18 Santa Fe Sport model that your wife has.
 

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Mileage has been great at 28.3 mpg during this time (using gas purchased and mileage driven) on the 2.0T awd.
Are you always driving downhill? My measured mileage, since purchase (about 2500 miles), is 21.8 mpg for the 2.0T. This is a mixed rural driving with about 25% highway (55-75mph.)
 

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Are you always driving downhill? My measured mileage, since purchase (about 2500 miles), is 21.8 mpg for the 2.0T. This is a mixed rural driving with about 25% highway (55-75mph.)
Your mpg is similar to my FWD 2.0 T. Other folks might live near an Interstate ramp and do mostly highway driving. Pity the folks who live in cities.
 

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Yea I am not talking about mpg. Or 0-60 times. I'm saying the time it takes the engine to move the throttle body to the same percentage as what I have on the throttle pedal takes twice as long as my 2019 vs the wife's 2017 is all. The "awkward pause" I know I am not the only who feels it. I have seen 2 or 3 threads talking about. So its been covered but everyone in those threads were calling it turbo lag and that is not what the problem is.
 

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The image below might help forum members better understand the idea behind throttle mapping. Back in the day, the accelerator pedal was directly connected to the mechanical throttle by cable or linkage, so the "Mechanical Throttle" curve is what you always had. 50% of the accelerator pedal pushed down equaled 50% throttle.

When cars went to "drive by wire" where there's no mechanical linkage, the manufacturers found that they could change the mapping of pedal position vs. mechanical throttle position. In this illustration, "Factory Throttle" is probably similar to our "Comfort Mode" mapping; "Off-Road & Economy Mode" is probably similar to our
Smart Mode"; and "Sport Mode" being obvious. There are also other factors that the manufactures do such as changing transmission shift points that also affect performance and MPG, not illustrated here.

Notice in "Factory Throttle" (Comfort Mode) there's a lag where 20% of travel on the accelerator only results in 10% of travel on the mechanical, and they don't really line up until around 60%

So why would the "Factory Throttle" not map the same as "Mechanical Throttle"? Mostly for fuel economy - fast starts from stop have a very significant effect on MPG. This mapping sort of forces drivers to start more gradually. Maybe some drivers like it better too and they think it has improved driveability.

Notice the "Off-Road & Economy Mode" (Smart Mode) lags much more in early travel for even slower starts and "Sport Mode" is always above the curve for faster throttle responsiveness.

Finally, a note about turbos. There's always an inherent lag with a turbo because it needs to mechanically spin up from a lower RPM to higher RPM as the engine revs. It used to be very noticeable but most turbos now react pretty quickly. Nonetheless, if you combine a slight turbo lag in the 2.0T with "Factory Throttle" (Comfort Mode) or "Off-Road & Economy Mode" (Smart Mode), even a slight lag will be more noticeable. To make things even more pronounced, the transmission shift point has an impact. One of the criticisms of our Santa Fe 2.0T setups is that in "Factory Throttle" (Comfort Mode) or "Off-Road & Economy Mode" (Smart Mode), the turbo lag and the shift from 1st gear to 2nd gear can happen very close together depending on how you're driving, so just when the turbo is kicking in and engine power is increasing, ugh it upshifts.

OP has a legitimate request to improve the driveability of the car. Imagine if the "Off-Road & Economy Mode" (Smart Mode) were flipped and/or the 1st to 2nd gear shift point were delayed, much of the perceived lag would be less noticeable with potential impacts in MPG.
Thrust-Monkey-curves-v1.jpg
 
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