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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys,

I have a new set of tires and wheels with pre-installed TPMS sensors on the way, and I need to take the somewhere to get them put on the car and the sensors activated. They're being shipped as ready-to-mount, which means nothing needs to be attached or inflated or mounted to wheels, etc. They're pre-balanced and ready to put on the car.

I've tried calling the actual dealership, but they seemed confused by what I was asking and kept quoting me prices to have tires mounted to wheels, old TPMS sensors moved, etc.

It seems like it would be very simple, but I'm having trouble getting a straight answer. Can't I just take the already mounted, already inflated tire/wheel/tpms set to a shop and have them put them on the car and activate the sensors? What's the best way to go about this? Since the TPMS sensors are new, do I have to go to the Hyundai dealership, or would most any decent tire place have the proper equipment to mate the new sensors with the car?

Thanks!
 

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All new sensors needs to be reprogrammed to the car by the dealer. Pricey.

Its a 2014, those good working sensors still have a long life. Using the old sensors will not require reprogramming. Just transfer the old sensors to the new rims and remount the tires. Cheaper.

Save the new sensors when the battery of the old ones starts to die..about 7-10 years.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the reply! I've already paid for new TPMS sensors and they're shipping to me already, so I'll have to go with new sensors. How pricey is it to have them activated? I literally just need the tires bolted to the car and the sensors activated ...
 

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I can answer this... In part anyway. Bit late I know for the OP, but for thread completeness.

I have a 2016 UK Tucson with 19" rims. I also have a full sized alloy spare with the same tyre as the rest of the car.

I have a reason to swap the spare with one of the mounted wheels, so I'm going to take the opportunity to mount a genuine TPMS in the spare at the same time.

So I've ordered the OEM TPMS sensor (£134 - ouch). That comes tomorrow or Thursday.

I'll then take it to my local friendly tyre guy to demount the spare tyre, install TPMS and remount, then swap the wheels over ('cos I'm lazy!).

The local Hyundai service manager has OK'd all of this (it's easier for them not to do the tyre swap as they're booked solid for weeks). But I have a warranty fix in 2 weeks for the LKAS, so he said they'll code the sensor in for me then.

He told me to be sure to get the serial number off the new sensor (I'll take photos) and then apparently it's a quick process costing maybe £25-30 (at their usually large hourly rates). But I'm hoping for a discount as they'll have the car in the shop anyway.

On an aside:

I've been led to believe that after that, the car will self discover the sensors if I move the wheels around without need for further fiddling - the programming is a one time registration.

This will at least give me a fully functional spare.

I asked if the TPMS sensors had a limited lifespan (eg 5 years) - parts chap said he thought they'd last longer as he'd heard the Hyundai ones (on my car at least) were without battery. Not sure how likely that is - whether a NFC is able to power them or they use the rotation of the wheel + magnetism or something clever.
Does anyone know anything about that?

I'll add a post after fitting the wheel to verify of the car auto senses the new sensor or not, then again when (if required as claimed) Hyundai code it in.
 

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On an aside - I think we need a TPMS sticky here. Anyone vote for that?

Things like (obviously facts against particular models and year and type).

1) Can the car support 5 or 8 or 10 sensors and autosense the wheels as they are fitted (eg winter wheel swaps).

2) Programming procedure.

3) What generic sensors are good? And do the generics only work if they clone the original serial numbers (seems likely)?

Cheers,

Tim
 

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I'm pretty sure you can just put the new wheels on the car and in 5-10 miles the TPMS will recognize the new sensors and turn off the TPMS light.

At least I would try that first.
Even with a brand new sensor?

Well - I will certainly be able to test that for everyone here this week :) It would be nice to have a definitive answer (at least for the current type of TPMS).

Even Hyundai don't seem very confident of their information at times... What's also curious is TPMS is mandatory in the EU now for new cars. And yet only one major tyre chain (that I can find on Google) confidently proclaims they have the equipment to fit and code a particularly versatile make of generic sensor (that can emulate loads of common OEM sensors). That's National Tyres (UK). They're not the only big chain (JustTyres has more branches) but they're the only one I can find that doesn't fudge the issue with some random mumble...
 

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I see this is an older forum, but it aligns close to my question. My 17 Elantra has 225/45/17s. I'm looking to put snow tires on this year, something I have not done in over 30 years. I was looking at a tire/rim package so I could easily swap them back in the spring.

Tirerack appears to have a package deal, however they are suggesting I drop the tire size all the way down to 195/65/15 for better traction and handling in the snow, on the new rims they are preinstalling on, something I have never done before. I checked with a local, but national tire chain and they said not to do it. My local Hyundai service guy, who personally I feel is useless, said I can maybe drop down to a 205/50/17 but anything more I would run into issues. I also checked with an independent tire dealer and they said I'd have no issues.

So my questions are:

1. Has anyone dropped a tire size, and if so that much and any issues?
2. Following the TPMS tread, for $200 ($50 per tire) they will install new sensors in the new rims, but will I need to still have the dealer re-program them, or should I just save the $200 and ignore the light for the winter while these tires are installed.

Thanks!
 

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1. 195/65R15 was stock on the SE and SE Eco - not seeing why it would be a problem. I've read various opinions on thinner tires on snow, and won't discuss that.
2. According to the thread, there is NO programming required IF you get the correct part number TPMS sensors - unless TR is using universal sensors and saying the tire dealer would need to re-program them.
 

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Hello,

This is an older forum but I own a 2015 Hyundai Sonata and i'm looking for good durable winter tires for this upcoming winter. I heard Eco 205/65R16 and SE 205/65R are solid. Any suggestions?
 

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Hello,

This is an older forum but I own a 2015 Hyundai Sonata and i'm looking for good durable winter tires for this upcoming winter. I heard Eco 205/65R16 and SE 205/65R are solid. Any suggestions?
Tire Rack has Blizzak WS80s on clearance right now. The WS90 is the new model with new tread design, but it’s still the same tread compound.

I picked up 4 for my Sonata for $114 each.
 
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