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Discussion Starter #1
Got the Destination LE IIs installed on my '06 Santa Fe. Had the Hunter 9700 Road Force Balancing and Straight Track tire matching done when mounting them.

Used alternative 4- wheel alignment specifications as supplied by SBR711. I installed Stempf 41-212 camber adjustment bolts before taking it in for the tire mount and alignment. The final alignment numbers came out at Front camber adjusted to -.1 left and -.5 right, caster non-adjustable left at 2.6 and 2.9, toe adjusted to +.04 and +.05. Rear adjusted to camber -.3 and -.5, toe +.03 and +.05. The rear adjustments are a back and forth puzzle between the camber and the toe as one affects the other. Thrust angle came out to .01.

The handling and the ride are much improved. Vehicle now tracks straight ahead and the tires stick to the pavement. The dealership service writer and mechanic didn’t give me any grief for diverting from the Hyundai alignment specifications. 78000 miles currently on the odometer and expecting another 70000 plus more.

Be Safe, Mark V.
 

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Nice looking Santa Fe! I just had Bridgestone Dueler H.L. Ecopia put on mine. Intended to get the Destinations but the shop gave me a great deal on the Stones. Had an alignment done at the same. The mechanic told me that one of the eccentric bolts on the left rear was stripped and because of this they couldn't get that wheel aligned to exact specs. I looked at the bolt and found it difficult to believe that it could be stripped. Possibly they gave up on the dance you mentioned? Is the process really that difficult?
 

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Thanks. I’ve read good reviews on the BS 422 Ecopias. Sometime ago I was looking at the Michelin LTX M/S. My wife doesn’t need the M&S feature for driving on city streets and then there was the price differential - $648 vs $446…

What your mechanic is telling you is that the cam feature of the bolt is stripped - meaning that the bolt will not move the cam to the required specification. The bolt passes through the front of the rear frame. On the rear of this frame is the cam then a lockwasher and nut that tightens on the bolt. I watched the dealership mechanic loosen all four nuts and then move the bolts to adjust the camber and toe. From what I saw the lower assembly moved the camber and the upper moved the toe. As one affected the other my mechanic spent nearly half an hour moving the cams around until he got it where I wanted it.

It would take some effort but your mechanic could take the assemblies apart and using some lubrication put them back together. The problem is that the rear subframe and the cam assemblies get “weathered” and then the bolt won’t move the cam.

What were your final alignment numbers? Did they at least give you a printout? The dealership that I used had an old dot matrix printer – that had long ago run out of paper! I wrote down my final numbers. I went with negative camber but positive toe. Usually front wheel drive vehicles use negative toe. I am quite pleased with the results. Most importantly my wife likes the way her CUV drives with the new tires and alignment. You might ask your mechanic or another alignment shop what it would entail (cost) to R/R the bolts and cams in order to get them back to fully functional.

Be Safe, Mark V.
 

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Thanks for the info about the cam bolts. I'm told that they are a dealer part so it might take me a while to get them replaced. The final numbers from the alignment are:
Left rear camber -0.3 Right rear camber 0.1
Left rear toe 0.26 Right rear toe -0.17
Total toe 0.62
Thrust angle 0.32

The car seems to ride pretty good and no strange vibrations. I paid for a lifetime alignment so hopefully they will be able to get it into specs on the next visit.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
06Santee, the camber bolts are not an OEM part. They are an aftermarket piece that allows movement to adjust camber. I used Stempf because a local alignment shop had the 41-212, 12mm kit in stock. There are a number of brands including Eibach that sell these bolts. I actually installed the bolts myself before taking it in for the alignment. I didn't want the added cost of the dealership mechanic installing such a simple part for me. $$$

I am a bit confused on your alignment numbers. You did pay for the 4-wheel alignment, no? What were the final front numbers?
Seems odd that you have a left negative and right positive camber number. Same oddity with the toes. Left positive and right negative. SBR711 will hopefully chime in with his opinion and interpretation on these numbers.

Here is what he suggested to me:

Front cambers
Run what you got, ideally no more than negative 0.5, but camber not readily adjustable, so look for side to side balance (spread) of no more than 0.5 degree.. any greater and thing could start to push/pull to least negative side..

Front toe:
+0.05 each side, total no more than +0.12.

Rear Camber:
No more than -0.5 degree, just enough to hold rear firm, and not cause tire edge wear like some that have more negative and run on edge of tire, then add gross toe into the mix..Rear toe:
+0.05 each side.

Be Safe, Mark V.
 
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