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Discussion Starter #1
Hi,

I have a 2013 Hyundai i20 which I bought a week ago.

The braking power in general is ok, but not great.
Also the handbrake lever is too easy to pull up. And when I parked uphill this weekend, the car was rolling away even though the handbrake was fully engaged.

Yesterday I decided to inspect the brakes. The front brakes (pads / discs) are in good condition.

The rear brakes are bad. The pads are okay but the disc is worn down quite a lot and has a relatively high edge on the outside. I decided to replace the discs, pads and handbrake shoes.

I bought the following:
  • New handbrake shoes
  • New handbrake shoes fitting springs/pins
  • New discs
  • New pads

I did not buy a new handbrake shoe adjustment screw. Even though it would have been better. On the driver's side, the 'screw' part of the adjuster works (turns) but the other side (the one that should be freely turning) is stuck. So it cannot be adjusted when it's installed.

I installed the new brake shoes, I put the adjuster screw on the smallest position (completely screwed in) and I even loosened the handbrake cable inside the mid panel.

However, when installing the disc over the new handbrake shoes, even with the handbrake not engaged, it is VERY hard to get the disc on there and after that to turn it. So the handbrake shoes are making too much contact.

Do you have any ideas what to do? Both adjustments (shoe adjuster and handbrake cable) are very loose. So I don't know what to do anymore.

I saw a tip online to grind down the metal part on the shoes where the adjust fits, to make it even smaller and make the shoes be closer to eachother (decreasing the diameter of the entire braking-shoes circle. Is that smart or..?

Also, even the adjustment screw cannot be adjusted when installed, is that necesarrily an bad thing? Right now the smallest position already seems to big, so it seems fine to me to not be able to adjust it easily.

Any tips are more than welcome!
 

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My question is how much effort do you need to rotate the wheel. Maybe a couple of short drives with a good cool down in between may help knock the high spots off. Did you fit OE or aftermarket parts? I'm also concerned with your comment on the stuck adjuster. Why can't you free it up?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Well, a lot of effort is needed to turn it. I have the feeling it's too much.
WIthout tire on it, when turning the 'axle' by hand, it seems stuck. putting a longer stick between the bolts (where the tire would fit on) it's possible to completely turn it around.

On the passenger's side, it's easier to turn though. Still not smoothly, but easier.

Also, the disc is apparently fastened with one screw (not 2, even though there's 2 holes in the disc but only 1 in the axle-plate). When fastening this one screw it almost doesns't move at all. This makes sense as the disc is not flat, because there is only pressure on one side. I assume that's not an issue when the tire is on it

but without the screw, it's already hard to turn.

The adjuster is stuck because of rust.
 

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Heat the adjuster up red hot with oxy if you can and drop it into a bucket of water. That will free it up so just lube it and refit. The screws holding the disc are just there during car assembly to hold the disc on when going down the production line.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Okay. Yeah that's what I thought. The screw doesn't seem to be that important for keeping the disc in place, as the tire will go over it.

Okay, might try that!
However, as this adjuster is already in the smallest possible position, freeing that up won't make the disc fit properly over the handbrake shoes.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I don't know much about brakes but, even though this seems like a smart and ingenious system, it also feels very frustrating to work with after it has been there some time and is rusty etc. Also, fitting new ones is annoying (but I assume special tools exist to make it easier)
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I wonder if it's a good idea to grind a bit of metal away from the brake shoes where the adjuster would also go. So basically adjust it to be even smaller.
 

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Just a thought, ...
Sometimes the manufacturer changes parts during production runs
Check to make sure you have the correct disc for your vehicle
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Yep. I was thinking that too. I've contacted the shop I bought them to confirm I have the combination of the right parts. They say I do.

I have Brembo discs and K27 shoes.
 

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I've had to grind a bit of metal ear off my Brembo brakes pads in the rear before so they would float and drop in easily, on my Gen Coupe. It's the pads fault not being an exact OE replacement.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Okay. Will try that.

Still need to replace the adjuster though. Does anyone know the actual name for this 'star wheel', or better: the oem number?

It seems impossible to find
 

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The parking brakes shoes should slip over the rotors. The drum brake kit includes new pins, springs and adjusters. You should replace these items when overhauling the rear brakes. The kits are typically $18.95 USD, less than $ 20.

Make certain you turn the adjuster to minimum to allow the shoe to fit into the drum.
Measure inside diameter of drum. Adjust the brake shoE diameter 1/8” or 0.125 inches smaller than ID. This should allow the drum to fit over the Brake shoes and make adjustment smaller.

Make certain you face the adjuster in the correct position. This is to make certain you can use a screw driver to leverage and rotate the adjuster to tighten the shoe. Typically i like to face the adjustment wheel faced so leveraging the screwdriver down widen the adjuster and tighten the shoe next to the drum. Remember the left and right are mirror image. Do not face both adjusters as right hand tighten. One must be flipped upside down so left hand tightens. Then adjusting by levering the screwdriver down tighten left and right side.

Test three times before installation. Measure the shoe diameter. Close and adjust. Remove and measure. Make certain you are tightening and not loose. Do this before putting the disc brake pads n calipers on.
 

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Two more items to remember. 1). Do not forget the spring that hold the adjuster. This spring is a self adjusting and locking feature. 2). Old timers like me have another trick for adjusting drum brakes. Assemble the brake. Adjust the brake show until the show makes contact and you cannot rotate the brake. Then back off the adjuster 2 clicks. Do this the same way on both sides before closing the entire brake assembly. Also test the hand brake engagement. The wire adjuster is for rough adjustment only to adjust handle position before brake engagement. If you use the in-drum adjusters correctly, the rough adjustment will be in the correct position.
 

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Screw the spell checker. I mean shoe not show. Best wishes. Drum kit are sold at Rock auto. They are currently out of stock or 2-3 weeks out.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Hi,

Thanks so much for your clear information and instructions.
I indeed replaced all the springs and the shoes itself. The adjuster was not included in the spring set

I live in europe, so maybe that's a difference.

Do you happen to have an OEM number or another number for that part? I can't find it anywhere. I contacted some Hyundai dealers, but no luck. I should maybe order from the US using the right item number
 
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