Hyundai Forums banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi guys
I am been on this site awhile, just reading most.
I am trying to install my custom drl, my plan is to use a 4pins relay use power directly from battery, but I need a signal/power to trigger, so it will be on and off itself.
My first choice is some short of signal that only exist when engine on, but I could not think of any
Second choice is signal from ACC. ( My car has start button and nav)
I red few threads from here that ppl installed new radio/dvd, hope that some of you would know and point out for me atleast 1wire's color code. If I think correctly, there is should be one wire from the back of the cd player (ACC) OR other should fine. I am too chiken to open and break things lol.
Please help
Thanks for reading guys
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
89 Posts
Here's the process I used to install DRLs that are turned on automatically when the engine is running and are turned off automatically when the headlights are operating, or there is no power to the engine.

1. Buy a multimeter, which will make it a lot easier for you to find the circuits you need. Here's the $4.95 model I bought at my local electronics store and it worked fine. I put the setting to 20V.



2. I bought a 5 pin relay, similar to this style (buy the correct voltage and amps for your own needs). It was about $6. You want a relay that has a circuit which is closed when in its normal state and open when the coil is activated.



From the diagram on the side of the relay you can see that current will go straight through this relay via pins 3 and 4.

If current is supplied through pins 1 and 2 this will energise a magnetic coil, which will attract the bar completing the circuit between pins 3 and 4 and this bar will now create a new circuit between pins 3 and 5, cutting the power through pins 3 and 4.

Now it is just a simple matter of connecting things without creating any short circuits.

____________________________________________________

Step 1: Use your multimeter to find a fuse in your fuse box that has power while the engine is running and no power while the engine is off. Do not use any critical circuits like ignition, ABS, etc. Look for something like a demister, radio, whatever. The multimeter will help you to find this circuit and you should not go poking around connecting things without a multimeter. You may have to pull a fuse and use the multimeter probes on either side of the fuse connector, or you might be able to get a reading while the fuse is still in place.

Step 2: Once you have found the circuit you want, create a positive lead from that circuit (with the engine off). This can be as simple a baring the end of a wire and poking it down into the fuse holder then reinserting the fuse, or you can splice into a wire if there is room. Place an inline fuse into this new positive lead, so you protect your DRLs from any power spike. A blade fuse holder like this will cost a dollar or two and is cheap insurance. Both DRL positive power leads can splice off one fuse line.



Step 3: wire up your DRLs by connecting the power lead from the in-line fuse and grounding the negative circuit from the lights, then turn on the engine and test to see if the lights work while the engine is running and go off when the engine is turned off.

Step 4: Find the positive lead to your headlight (use your multimeter) and cut it in a convenient location, then add wire to extend each end of the cut so the wires can reach where you will position your relay.

Put one end of your extended headlight leads onto pin 1 and the other lead onto pin 2 (or vice versa for different relays). This will energise the coil and turn your DRLs off whenever current is provided to the headlight. Test this by starting your engine and checking the DRLs are active, then turn on your headlights and check the DRLs turn off.

Pins on the relay. It is a good idea to test the relay pins off the vehicle before doing any connections. A test wire from the positive terminal of a battery and another wire from the negative terminal can be used to test the pins by touching the wires to the pins. You will hear or feel a click when the coil is activated and that will tell you which are pins 1 and 2 if they are not clearly marked.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
413 Posts
Here's the process I used to install DRLs that are turned on automatically when the engine is running and are turned off automatically when the headlights are operating, or there is no power to the engine.

1. Buy a multimeter, which will make it a lot easier for you to find the circuits you need. Here's the $4.95 model I bought at my local electronics store and it worked fine. I put the setting to 20V.



2. I bought a 5 pin relay, similar to this style (buy the correct voltage and amps for your own needs). It was about $6. You want a relay that has a circuit which is closed when in its normal state and open when the coil is activated.



From the diagram on the side of the relay you can see that current will go straight through this relay via pins 3 and 4.

If current is supplied through pins 1 and 2 this will energise a magnetic coil, which will attract the bar completing the circuit between pins 3 and 4 and this bar will now create a new circuit between pins 3 and 5, cutting the power through pins 3 and 4.

Now it is just a simple matter of connecting things without creating any short circuits.

____________________________________________________

Step 1: Use your multimeter to find a fuse in your fuse box that has power while the engine is running and no power while the engine is off. Do not use any critical circuits like ignition, ABS, etc. Look for something like a demister, radio, whatever. The multimeter will help you to find this circuit and you should not go poking around connecting things without a multimeter. You may have to pull a fuse and use the multimeter probes on either side of the fuse connector, or you might be able to get a reading while the fuse is still in place.

Step 2: Once you have found the circuit you want, create a positive lead from that circuit (with the engine off). This can be as simple a baring the end of a wire and poking it down into the fuse holder then reinserting the fuse, or you can splice into a wire if there is room. Place an inline fuse into this new positive lead, so you protect your DRLs from any power spike. A blade fuse holder like this will cost a dollar or two and is cheap insurance. Both DRL positive power leads can splice off one fuse line.



Step 3: wire up your DRLs by connecting the power lead from the in-line fuse and grounding the negative circuit from the lights, then turn on the engine and test to see if the lights work while the engine is running and go off when the engine is turned off.

Step 4: Find the positive lead to your headlight (use your multimeter) and cut it in a convenient location, then add wire to extend each end of the cut so the wires can reach where you will position your relay.

Put one end of your extended headlight leads onto pin 1 and the other lead onto pin 2 (or vice versa for different relays). This will energise the coil and turn your DRLs off whenever current is provided to the headlight. Test this by starting your engine and checking the DRLs are active, then turn on your headlights and check the DRLs turn off.

Pins on the relay. It is a good idea to test the relay pins off the vehicle before doing any connections. A test wire from the positive terminal of a battery and another wire from the negative terminal can be used to test the pins by touching the wires to the pins. You will hear or feel a click when the coil is activated and that will tell you which are pins 1 and 2 if they are not clearly marked.
Nice write up!
I would just connect my new DRL to the DRL on the headlight and use a relay off it. Why get fancy?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you so much to write for me that much details, I really appreciated :)
I have the mult and also test light, but I did not proceed your steps. I do understand that too. I think the 4pins would work fine too.
I didn't do as your steps, because ibought a fuse line called Add a circuit. I hooked it up this morning into the sunroof fuse box (where your knee, below steering wheel). But seem that place had constant power and my light won't turn off after I shut everything off. Made me think I must find wire instead of fuse.
Any chance I did something wrong here ?
Thanks again
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,814 Posts
Great write up. I know nothing about electrical in a car, nor do I have any interest in having DRL. But after reading your instructions, I almost want to do it just to prove to myself that I now can. :)
John
Here's the process I used to install DRLs that are turned on automatically when the engine is running and are turned off automatically when the headlights are operating, or there is no power to the engine.

1. Buy a multimeter, which will make it a lot easier for you to find the circuits you need. Here's the $4.95 model I bought at my local electronics store and it worked fine. I put the setting to 20V.



2. I bought a 5 pin relay, similar to this style (buy the correct voltage and amps for your own needs). It was about $6. You want a relay that has a circuit which is closed when in its normal state and open when the coil is activated.



From the diagram on the side of the relay you can see that current will go straight through this relay via pins 3 and 4.

If current is supplied through pins 1 and 2 this will energise a magnetic coil, which will attract the bar completing the circuit between pins 3 and 4 and this bar will now create a new circuit between pins 3 and 5, cutting the power through pins 3 and 4.

Now it is just a simple matter of connecting things without creating any short circuits.

____________________________________________________

Step 1: Use your multimeter to find a fuse in your fuse box that has power while the engine is running and no power while the engine is off. Do not use any critical circuits like ignition, ABS, etc. Look for something like a demister, radio, whatever. The multimeter will help you to find this circuit and you should not go poking around connecting things without a multimeter. You may have to pull a fuse and use the multimeter probes on either side of the fuse connector, or you might be able to get a reading while the fuse is still in place.

Step 2: Once you have found the circuit you want, create a positive lead from that circuit (with the engine off). This can be as simple a baring the end of a wire and poking it down into the fuse holder then reinserting the fuse, or you can splice into a wire if there is room. Place an inline fuse into this new positive lead, so you protect your DRLs from any power spike. A blade fuse holder like this will cost a dollar or two and is cheap insurance. Both DRL positive power leads can splice off one fuse line.



Step 3: wire up your DRLs by connecting the power lead from the in-line fuse and grounding the negative circuit from the lights, then turn on the engine and test to see if the lights work while the engine is running and go off when the engine is turned off.

Step 4: Find the positive lead to your headlight (use your multimeter) and cut it in a convenient location, then add wire to extend each end of the cut so the wires can reach where you will position your relay.

Put one end of your extended headlight leads onto pin 1 and the other lead onto pin 2 (or vice versa for different relays). This will energise the coil and turn your DRLs off whenever current is provided to the headlight. Test this by starting your engine and checking the DRLs are active, then turn on your headlights and check the DRLs turn off.

Pins on the relay. It is a good idea to test the relay pins off the vehicle before doing any connections. A test wire from the positive terminal of a battery and another wire from the negative terminal can be used to test the pins by touching the wires to the pins. You will hear or feel a click when the coil is activated and that will tell you which are pins 1 and 2 if they are not clearly marked.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
pracshooter
I used the mult and checked again. Who could of thought I pick the wrong spot, the fuse 20A for sunroof somehow got constant power. I guess the sunroof switch will complete the circuit by ground.
I found all my opts, fuse pump if I wanted DRL on/off with engine, or I can use ACC with windshield wiper to trigger. I am happy happy now to move on :)
Thanks again for your help with great write up for others to use.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
89 Posts
Tried. Didn't work. The LEDs flickered because the relay couldn't decide if the engine was off or on and it kept cycling. At startup the voltage was sufficiently high to trip the relay and feed current to the LEDs. After the engine was running for a while the alternator output drops to close to the relay cutoff voltage. If your alternator puts out a consistently high voltage this type of relay will stay on. The alternator on my Santa Fe is smart enough to provide a minimal effective charge, close to the voltage this relay considers to be 'off'. Maybe this type of relay differs between manufacturers, but mine looked like the one shown and it was only suitable for a consistently high alternator output and no good for running LEDs on my vehicle.

Added: My Santa Fe is a Highlander 2.2 turbo diesel and there appears to be very little load on the alternator when the engine is running. Maybe the alternator output is higher on a petrol model and this type of relay would work.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Intresting, I have fitted various types of DRL relays to various different vehicles and never had that problem.
I take it you had the feed connected directly to the battery and the ACC wire connected to the ignition switch?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
89 Posts
Ah, I see the difference in the relay you recommend. My controller from Ebay was fitted to the positive and negative sides of the battery and had no option to fit a lead to the accessory feed. On a push button keyless start I would be reluctant to fiddle with that anyway. Total cost of a local relay, fuse and connectors was less than $10 and no waiting on postage. Personal preference, I guess.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top