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Hello all,
I am new to the forums although I have been visiting for a while. I wanted to see if anyone could help. My wife filled our 2010 Sonata 2.4 with approx. 4 gal of diesel, car was on E, and drove for about 2 miles. The car did not die but was acting up so she pulled over and called me.

I have had a hard time knowing what to do. Dealership is saying $2000 because everything will need to be flushed and replaced.

I have read a few things saying empty the tank, filler up, and burn it off.

So this is a two part question. First, should I just empty the tank, put fresh gas in, and burn it off? I will also change the plugs as I am sure they are gunked up. Or should I have the tank dropped, cleaned, lines flushed, injectors cleans, filter replaced, etc, etc?

Secondly, if I decide to do it myself, what is the best way to siphon. I have not had any luck yet.

Cheers!
 

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IMO, Diesel is just a form of lightweight motor oil that will burn off. I suggest you siphon, & drain the tank, then just add about 5gals regular gas to dilute it, and just run it out, while assessing how it runs. If there are any issues, at least you won't have a full gas tank to deal with.
 

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I agree drain the tank fill it up and burn the diesel in the lines out. It might take some doing as it's in the lines and you be running bad for a bit might even get a CEL but thats just what the dealership is going to do. The likelyhood of the cat going bad with such little diesel in there is unlikely.
 

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Sorry, I don't know what you should do.

But I have a question. How could this happen? I thought diesel nozzles were designed so not to fit the fill tube of standard gasoline tanks.
John
That's right. There's no way to pump diesel in there without making a huge mess since the nozzle won't fit in the fill tube. In any event, I agree with others, just drain the tank, fill it with gas and go.
 

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Drain what you can,, refill with 87. Dont know where Alphretta is, but starting and cold run might be a pain untill it get good and hot engine temp to aid light off of diesel mix.. and may see some grey particulate out the exhaust when under load.

Take for good long run down interstate to burn off load of fuel, and refuel again when level as low as you dare, should clear up after it get run out.

I used to take the fuel we drained from customer cars that made similar mistake, and dump a gallon or so in my beater,, didnt bother me, free fuel to me that I did not have to spend money on, and 80% of my drive to/from work was interstate, all I had to do was get started and drive.
 

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i had a friend who filled up on diesel in his old x3....**** thing never ran right after that. although its true that most diesel pumps have a different spout for filling, there are the odd few old ones that do not. in the case of my friend, the delivery guy filled the wrong tank at the station.

diesel can be mixed with gasoline and burn fine in small amounts. mikdee is correct in saying that diesel is like motor oil....sort of. right now for $2000, forget the dealer. the damage is done, what more can you really do at this point? drain the tank and fill with gas. if you're handy, you can drain the fuel rail and even run the fuel pump to bleed off some of the fuel from the supply line you just disconnected from the rail. that should get just about all of it and get the diesel concentration down to an extremely low level.

this is one of the few times i'd recommend a fuel/injector cleaner...might want to bookmark this boys. you have something to clean up here so i'd say its a good idea or at least couldn't hurt at this point.

finally i'd pull the plugs out and if not replacing at least give them a good clean up with a soft wire brush. diesel can make soot and may leave deposits on your plugs. anything else can be assessed once this crap has a chance to clear out.
 

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I expect the fuel pump is electric and is located in the tank. Most are these days. The pump will be bolted inside the fuel tank and there will be an access cover above it. It could be located toward the rear of the car trunk just behind the rear seats. Pull the matt back and look for it. It will likely have a number of bolts holding it down and an O ring or some seal under it. Once off you should have good access to removing the remaining diesel from the tank.

Next you might cap it back off, add five gallons of gas then look for a line that you can disconnect that will allow the fuel pump to pump out as much diesel as possible. There should be a disconnect at the fuel rails somewhere. Put a rubber gas line over it and discharge the diesel into a five gallon diesel fuel can using the electric fuel pump. Turning on the ignition should energize it. Reconnect the line and burn off any diesel left in the fuel rails.

You might check the plugs, you might even remove them and turn the engine over to blow out the remaining diesel. I would not try to clean the iridium electrodes with a wire brush. The are very easy to damage according to Denso. New ones are $8 each or so. Just replace them if they don't run correctly. Good luck with it. Hwy61
 

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:rolleyes: I think we've been hoodwinked by a fake post.
 

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Right you are, John. Besides, who else but a wife could figure out a way to insert a diesel pump's nozzle into a regular gas fill port? :wink2: I'm certain my wife has the potential and flair to manage it, somehow. (Don't tell her I said that. I'd like to survive long enough to see what Santa brings next week.)
 

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My nephew did this one time and it was an expensive mistake. Probably about $2,000 before it is back in running form. It's always a good idea to check which pump is being used. The diesel is usually marked with a green cover over the handle if I am not mistaken.

If there is any doubt it might be a good idea to smell the nozzle. The diesel should be readily obvious. I sometimes do this when I am on the road and am not familiar with the pump arrangement.
 
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