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I brought my own brake pads to my mechanic and he said the new brake pads didn't come with "hardware" that my car needed. He said he had to take out the old "hardware" and put it in the new brake pads.

What is the hardware? Do I need this hardware for the rear brakes, too?
 

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the spacer between brake pad and caliper. Depends on the condition of hardware, if they are shinny and no rust it's OK to reuse
 

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Where did you get your pads? The dealer pads come with the hardware but are pricey. I just looked at Rock Auto and you can get a set of pads for the rear for less than $20 that come with the hardware. You can see the hardware in the pictures of the pads.
 

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I brought my own brake pads to my mechanic and he said the new brake pads didn't come with "hardware" that my car needed. He said he had to take out the old "hardware" and put it in the new brake pads.

What is the hardware? Do I need this hardware for the rear brakes, too?
Some budget brands do not come with the shims that reside between the caliper bracket and pad. OEM pad sets include these parts as do most of the higher end aftermarket pad sets.

As stated above, the shims may be reused if they are not badly worn or corroded but should either condition exist they should be replaced to avoid pads "sticking" or "binding".

http://mmm56784.blob.core.windows.net/images/61223010.jpg
 

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If one is talking about the disc brakes then the brake hardware is the shim that fits into the caliper bracket
It holds the pads and also allows them to slide when the caliper is activated
Sometimes called the ears of the pads, they sit in or on the shims
And these shims may or may not have grease applied to them (depends on the mechanic)
There are also shims on the back of the pads
If the pads squeal then brake quiet can be applied to the back of the pads to stop the vibrations.

If one is talking about drum brakes then the hardware could consist of springs and shims and other things
The springs hold everything together
And grease may or may not be applied to the backing or rear dust cover where the brake shoes rest against
The hardware may also consist of an adjuster rod used to position the brake shoes tighter or looser against the drum
 

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As mentioned, generally the only hardware that you will get are the caliper clips where the pads sit. Your mechanic should have just ordered a set from his parts supplier and said you needed them. The cost would of been about $3-5 for front and rear. No point in using new pads with old hardware when the cost is so minor. Do they ever really need to be replaced unless they are broken? Discussion for another time.

Sometimes a hardware kit will include caliper bushings as well, for the slide pins. Again, cost is minor. A kit that included both would be less than $10.
 
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