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This statement makes me laugh: "While limp mode is unpleasant, especially if it occurs on the highway, it will allow owners to drive home and contract their dealership." What happens if home is 200 miles across the hot Arizona desert? Will the AC work in "Limp Mode"? Most limp modes limit the vehicle speed to about 30mph.


Not too worried. If things get real bad they are likely to have to buy back a bunch of vehicles. VW bought back my TDI diesel for more than I paid for it. Paid off my loan and put 10 grand in my pocket. That put me into a new 2017 Hyundai, which I traded for my '19.
 

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953, been running a few month,, proclaimed "product improvement".. Numerous topics running already


Old news,,

Next..................................................
 

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‘19 Santa Fe Ultimate 2.0T FWD (Machine Gray/Espresso Gray)
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This recall does NOT include the ‘19 Santa Fe.
 

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This statement makes me laugh: "While limp mode is unpleasant, especially if it occurs on the highway, it will allow owners to drive home and contract their dealership." What happens if home is 200 miles across the hot Arizona desert? Will the AC work in "Limp Mode"? Most limp modes limit the vehicle speed to about 30mph.


Not too worried. If things get real bad they are likely to have to buy back a bunch of vehicles. VW bought back my TDI diesel for more than I paid for it. Paid off my loan and put 10 grand in my pocket. That put me into a new 2017 Hyundai, which I traded for my '19.


A more informative release from Hyundai.

“The vehicle can continue to be operated for a limited time in engine protection mode to enable the customer to safely drive it to a Hyundai dealer for inspection and repair, but acceleration will be slower, with a reduced maximum speed of approximately 60 to 65 mph and a limited engine speed of approximately 1,800 to 2,000 rpm.”

Full story below.

https://www.hyundainews.com/en-us/releases/2696
 

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953, been running a few month,, proclaimed "product improvement".. Numerous topics running already


Old news,,

Next..................................................

Yep. Old news.
Multiple threads seems to be the preferred mode here.
Like 4 or 5 about the heated seats.
 

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Obviously you don't ice fish...what if the other Canucks hear about this? :whistling:
 

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Got burned by this recall. Not literally, but my 2015 Hyundai Sante Fe just failed on a road trip. It has been 'burning' a lot of oil very suddenly, requiring a few liters between gas up's. We we taking it on the following week for a tune up and inspection, but it didn't make it that far. During a road trip to a friends cabin, the car started sputtering and the engine light flickered on, then the car just died. We managed to get it going again briefly for a few more 'limp mode' minutes, but it completely failed in the middle of nowhere. Tow Truck had to pull is in to nearest town where the mechanic said he has seen a half dozen Santa Fe's with the exact same issue in the past year.
He suggested contacting Hyundai Canada. Our car was just outside of the 60 month warranty, but when we talked with the nearest dealer, they confirmed the engine warranty extension and had us tow the vehicle another 100km to them. We spent over $700 on two tow truck trips which is apparently going to be refunded. Our local dealer didn't mention the warranty extension and has said there isn't any issue since day 1 when we bought the vehicle. We did have the recall fix in place, but it did pretty much nothing. It certainly doesn't prevent the engine failure. Penticton Hyundai ended up replacing the engine and covering a car rental for two weeks. We are pretty concerned that even with a new engine, this is just going to happen again. The car had about 125,000km on it, so it is very concerning an engine could fail so quickly. I have had a number of Honda's that made it well past 500,000km and were still going strong.
I am adding my comments here because we have a few friends with Santa Fe's. They are a very popular car in our area. I don't know if this will effect everyone who owns one, but it is definitely a major concern when it does. We love road trips and not having faith in your car to bring you home isn't ideal. We have driven to northern BC and back, as well as all the way to Arizona and back to the Vancouver area. The car has been well maintained with regular oil changes and all scheduled maintenance. My wife complained about hesitations within the first year of driving the car, but I never noticed it until about a week before the engine died. At that time, the car literally felt like it had stalled. Fortunately I was just driving in to a parking lot. After stomping on the gas for the fourth time it came alive again and was 'fine'. Then one week later, completely dead.
Probably looking at selling it ASAP. Was originally considering a Honda CR-V because of my faith in Honda, but I see they have a major issue with oil dilution which they claim is fixed on the newest model years, but there is still some skepticism. Now thinking about a Maza CX-5. We had a Mazda 5 about ten years ago and it was a great family car other than being too heavy for its frame (springs and tire wear). Definitely soured on the Hyundai brand and not impressed at all with how our local Hyundai dealer sloughed off our complaints over the years. While I am fairly happy that it hasn't been a huge fight to get the repairs covered under warranty, the engine failure could have just as easily ended up in tragedy based on where it failed in the high mountain passes where there is very little shoulder to pull over on.
As a preventative measure Hyundai said they have knock detection equipment now at the dealers so they can analyze cars for anyone who is worried. Not sure that this will prevent anyone's engine from failing, unless it is imminent.
Buyer beware!
 

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Got burned by this recall. Not literally, but my 2015 Hyundai Sante Fe just failed on a road trip. It has been 'burning' a lot of oil very suddenly, requiring a few liters between gas up's. We we taking it on the following week for a tune up and inspection, but it didn't make it that far. During a road trip to a friends cabin, the car started sputtering and the engine light flickered on, then the car just died. We managed to get it going again briefly for a few more 'limp mode' minutes, but it completely failed in the middle of nowhere. Tow Truck had to pull is in to nearest town where the mechanic said he has seen a half dozen Santa Fe's with the exact same issue in the past year.
He suggested contacting Hyundai Canada. Our car was just outside of the 60 month warranty, but when we talked with the nearest dealer, they confirmed the engine warranty extension and had us tow the vehicle another 100km to them. We spent over $700 on two tow truck trips which is apparently going to be refunded. Our local dealer didn't mention the warranty extension and has said there isn't any issue since day 1 when we bought the vehicle. We did have the recall fix in place, but it did pretty much nothing. It certainly doesn't prevent the engine failure. Penticton Hyundai ended up replacing the engine and covering a car rental for two weeks. We are pretty concerned that even with a new engine, this is just going to happen again. The car had about 125,000km on it, so it is very concerning an engine could fail so quickly. I have had a number of Honda's that made it well past 500,000km and were still going strong.
I am adding my comments here because we have a few friends with Santa Fe's. They are a very popular car in our area. I don't know if this will effect everyone who owns one, but it is definitely a major concern when it does. We love road trips and not having faith in your car to bring you home isn't ideal. We have driven to northern BC and back, as well as all the way to Arizona and back to the Vancouver area. The car has been well maintained with regular oil changes and all scheduled maintenance. My wife complained about hesitations within the first year of driving the car, but I never noticed it until about a week before the engine died. At that time, the car literally felt like it had stalled. Fortunately I was just driving in to a parking lot. After stomping on the gas for the fourth time it came alive again and was 'fine'. Then one week later, completely dead.
Probably looking at selling it ASAP. Was originally considering a Honda CR-V because of my faith in Honda, but I see they have a major issue with oil dilution which they claim is fixed on the newest model years, but there is still some skepticism. Now thinking about a Maza CX-5. We had a Mazda 5 about ten years ago and it was a great family car other than being too heavy for its frame (springs and tire wear). Definitely soured on the Hyundai brand and not impressed at all with how our local Hyundai dealer sloughed off our complaints over the years. While I am fairly happy that it hasn't been a huge fight to get the repairs covered under warranty, the engine failure could have just as easily ended up in tragedy based on where it failed in the high mountain passes where there is very little shoulder to pull over on.
As a preventative measure Hyundai said they have knock detection equipment now at the dealers so they can analyze cars for anyone who is worried. Not sure that this will prevent anyone's engine from failing, unless it is imminent.
Buyer beware!
Thanks for your insight.
Curious. How often did you get your oil changed? What kms and or months?
 

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Got burned by this recall. Not literally, but my 2015 Hyundai Sante Fe just failed on a road trip. It has been 'burning' a lot of oil very suddenly, requiring a few liters between gas up's. We we taking it on the following week for a tune up and inspection, but it didn't make it that far. During a road trip to a friends cabin, the car started sputtering and the engine light flickered on, then the car just died. We managed to get it going again briefly for a few more 'limp mode' minutes, but it completely failed in the middle of nowhere. Tow Truck had to pull is in to nearest town where the mechanic said he has seen a half dozen Santa Fe's with the exact same issue in the past year.
He suggested contacting Hyundai Canada. Our car was just outside of the 60 month warranty, but when we talked with the nearest dealer, they confirmed the engine warranty extension and had us tow the vehicle another 100km to them. We spent over $700 on two tow truck trips which is apparently going to be refunded. Our local dealer didn't mention the warranty extension and has said there isn't any issue since day 1 when we bought the vehicle. We did have the recall fix in place, but it did pretty much nothing. It certainly doesn't prevent the engine failure. Penticton Hyundai ended up replacing the engine and covering a car rental for two weeks. We are pretty concerned that even with a new engine, this is just going to happen again. The car had about 125,000km on it, so it is very concerning an engine could fail so quickly. I have had a number of Honda's that made it well past 500,000km and were still going strong.
I am adding my comments here because we have a few friends with Santa Fe's. They are a very popular car in our area. I don't know if this will effect everyone who owns one, but it is definitely a major concern when it does. We love road trips and not having faith in your car to bring you home isn't ideal. We have driven to northern BC and back, as well as all the way to Arizona and back to the Vancouver area. The car has been well maintained with regular oil changes and all scheduled maintenance. My wife complained about hesitations within the first year of driving the car, but I never noticed it until about a week before the engine died. At that time, the car literally felt like it had stalled. Fortunately I was just driving in to a parking lot. After stomping on the gas for the fourth time it came alive again and was 'fine'. Then one week later, completely dead.
Probably looking at selling it ASAP. Was originally considering a Honda CR-V because of my faith in Honda, but I see they have a major issue with oil dilution which they claim is fixed on the newest model years, but there is still some skepticism. Now thinking about a Maza CX-5. We had a Mazda 5 about ten years ago and it was a great family car other than being too heavy for its frame (springs and tire wear). Definitely soured on the Hyundai brand and not impressed at all with how our local Hyundai dealer sloughed off our complaints over the years. While I am fairly happy that it hasn't been a huge fight to get the repairs covered under warranty, the engine failure could have just as easily ended up in tragedy based on where it failed in the high mountain passes where there is very little shoulder to pull over on.
As a preventative measure Hyundai said they have knock detection equipment now at the dealers so they can analyze cars for anyone who is worried. Not sure that this will prevent anyone's engine from failing, unless it is imminent.
Buyer beware!
What engine did your 2015 have?
 

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The 953 update never kicked in on my '11 Sonata, and it was a knockin' no limp mode, it jusk knocked, and seized.
 

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Thanks for your insight.
Curious. How often did you get your oil changed? What kms and or months?
Every 5,000-6,000km's. We put about 25K km's/ a year so every 3 months or less. We didn't do synthetic, but I doubt that would have helped.
 
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