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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
All,
Could you please help me to confirm these specs?
1. Does Elantra use 21mm sockets?
2. Which size of socket wrench (3/8", 3/4", or 1/2") is appropriate to use?
3. What is the best foot pounds for torque wrench between 50-100?
4. Does it have any effects on the wheel performance if we use 3/4" hex size of lug nut?

Thank you so much!
 

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All,
Could you please help me to confirm these specs?
1. Does Elantra use 21mm sockets?
2. Which size of socket wrench (3/8", 3/4", or 1/2") is appropriate to use?
3. What is the best foot pounds for torque wrench between 50-100?
4. Does it have any effects on the wheel performance if we use 3/4" hex size of lug nut?

Thank you so much!
My Accent has 21 mm lugs I believe, sounds right for your Elantra. Find a 21 mm socket and see if it fits.

3/8 ratchet will most likely work, I think a 1/2 inch would be better. No need to use a 3/4 inch ratchet.

The best torque value is the correct specs according to the manufacture. Check your manual for the correct numbers. Don't over tighten.
 

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All,
Could you please help me to confirm these specs?
1. Does Elantra use 21mm sockets?
2. Which size of socket wrench (3/8", 3/4", or 1/2") is appropriate to use?
3. What is the best foot pounds for torque wrench between 50-100?
4. Does it have any effects on the wheel performance if we use 3/4" hex size of lug nut?

Thank you so much!
1 - Use 12mm with 1.5mm thread pitch. The socket size is 21mm but you always choose by the thread size.
2 - Use 1/2 or 3/4 inch drive - the 3/8 is ok but you may struggle loosening bolts that are rusted or overtightened.
3 - Specs say 65-80 foot pounds. I set mine for 75 when swapping between winter and three-season wheel sets.
4 - The Elantra is a metric car. The 21mm size is a bit larger than 13/16 and smaller than 7/8, so neither fits well enough to use without possible damage to the lug nut. 3/4" is smaller than 13/16 and I doubt you will find any that fit a 12mm thread.
 

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Don't play games with the lug nuts. It's worth every penny you spend for a 21mm socket. SAE size may appear to fit, but be wary of "rounding off" the nut's corners. You do that and you'll have a mess on your hands.

75-80 Lbf. of torque is perfect, IMO. Only thing I would add is to put a couple of drops of motor oil onto the threads (or inside the nut cavity). This not only provides more torque accuracy but aids in keeping them from rusting and seizing up on the threads. Easy on-Easy off!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
1 - Use 12mm with 1.5mm thread pitch. The socket size is 21mm but you always choose by the thread size.
2 - Use 1/2 or 3/4 inch drive - the 3/8 is ok but you may struggle loosening bolts that are rusted or overtightened.
3 - Specs say 65-80 foot pounds. I set mine for 75 when swapping between winter and three-season wheel sets.
4 - The Elantra is a metric car. The 21mm size is a bit larger than 13/16 and smaller than 7/8, so neither fits well enough to use without possible damage to the lug nut. 3/4" is smaller than 13/16 and I doubt you will find any that fit a 12mm thread.
I bought new 20 lug nuts for my car last week and had a guy from Discount tire installed them for me today:
Thread Size: 12x1.5mm
Hex Size: 3/4"
Length: 1.40"
Width: .91"
The guy from discount tire said there weren't a problem with the fitment. The new lug nuts are smaller than the factory and I couldn't use my wrench tool from Hyundai spare tire kit to remove the nut. I guess I have to buy a new wrench. :D.
 

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Grab one of the X shaped 4 way tire irons. You will never need another one again. Each side is a different size.
 

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Grab one of the X shaped 4 way tire irons. You will never need another one again. Each side is a different size.
and will have extra leverage encase someone over torqed them to tonight
 

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I have a two foot breaker bar for mine. Years ago I had a lug nut round on me. Ended up using a die grinder to grind it to a smaller size. Nightmare.
 

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I have a two foot breaker bar for mine. Years ago I had a lug nut round on me. Ended up using a die grinder to grind it to a smaller size. Nightmare.
I didn't enjoy reading this one bit! I've been lucky, that's for sure. But that is a rather useful tip to know. Just in case!
 

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75-80 Lbf. of torque is perfect, IMO. Only thing I would add is to put a couple of drops of motor oil onto the threads (or inside the nut cavity). This not only provides more torque accuracy but aids in keeping them from rusting and seizing up on the threads. Easy on-Easy off!
No!!!

Do NOT put lubricant on threads!! Torque specs are always given for DRY threads unless it is specifically written to use a certain lubricant! When you lubricate a thread it will actually multiply the torque. Teflon tape on pipe fittings (or brass fittings) will have the same result.
 

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I do it to keep the threads from seizing up when those "ya-hoo's" at tire stores do their impact thing. Then they pull out a wrench. Of course it clicks. I back them off when I get home a re-torque them with a calibrated NIST-traceable wrench set to 75 Lbf. Ft. of torque, +/-5% tolerance over the entire range. Even if I slip a but due to "human involvement" I'm still well within the side spread Hyundai specifies. I don't think they call out "wet" or "dry" in their spec. rundown. If I was under the microscope of an FAA inspector, NASA, etc., I'd think better of it. But lug nuts. No rocket science there. :wink2:

Been doing it for 50 years, never rounded one off, broke one off, stripped or cross-threaded one. But I certainly understand where you're coming from. And your point is valid!
 

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I use the Power Wrench from Gorilla (Gorilla Automotive Products - Lug Nuts, Wheel Locks, Auto Security, Wheel Accessories) and just leave it with my spare. It has a wide range of socket sizes as well as an extendable handle. I unfortunately have used it many time here in RI.....the potholes do lovely things to my 18 inch wheels!
On my Elantra I use the Gorilla splined lugnuts, and never had a problem with them. The place I get my tire work done uses a torque limiting extension on the air gun and then go around with a torque wrench and re-torque everything. I have changed tires a few times and never had an issue with them being too tight....so it seems they are doing it correctly.
 
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Only thing I would add is to put a couple of drops of motor oil onto the threads (or inside the nut cavity). This not only provides more torque accuracy but aids in keeping them from rusting and seizing up on the threads. Easy on-Easy off!
Sorry, you are totally wrong regarding torque. Torque accuracy is strictly a function of the torque wrench calibration. Torque is torque, and the wrench is what controls how much is applied. Friction comes into play when turning that torque into bolt preload, i.e., the tension in the bolt holding things together. So when applying the same torque, "dry" threads and/or head will produce less preload than lubricated threads and/or head because more of the torque is simply overcoming friction and not producing preload. What lubrication "will" do is decrease the uncertainty in the final preload achieved because "dry" friction can vary quite a bit, but it will always result in a higher preload than dry. So the moral of this story is since the manufacture's torque spec is based on an estimate of field condition lubrication, and an oil covered lug is not the "normal" condition, I would expect you are over preloading (not over torqueing) your lugs by some unknown, but large amount.
 
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