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I have a 1.6l petrol Tucson (automatic) which I bought new in February 2020. Almost as soon as I got it (I'd guess within 3 weeks) it started exhibiting strange behaviour whilst driving. I'd put my foot down on the gas, and the car would slow down rather than speed up - as though I'd just lifted my foot off the pedal. Then after a few seconds it could bunny hop forward, like it received a sudden burst of fuel. If I floored the gas, it would bunny hop along the road for up to a minute or so at 25-30 mph, then eventually it would kind of realise my foot was on the gas and start revving the engine properly and accelerate.

This problem was intermittent and went away completely for months over the summer, then came back with a vengeance over the winter. I attributed this change to the temperature, but I now know it almost certainly related to using the car regularly but almost exclusively for short journeys which I did soon after I got the car, and all over winter (covid lockdowns 1 and 2). After many frustrating interactions with the AA and Hyundai servicing the likely root cause emerged - the new particulate filters which I'm told are standard on all new cars as of 2020. I have since seen the orange warning light on the dash telling me that filter is clogged and I need to drive the car up the motorway to clear it out, although I've only ever seen that light once - the usual experience is not the warning light but the loss of power and the bunny hopping.

I accept Hyundai's logic that it is this filter which is causing the problem, and taking it out for a long drive does seem to clear the problem for a little while, but here's where I think Hyundai's response (albeit one which I've heard independently from four different engineers now) stretched credulity: taking the car for a 100 mile jaunt on the motorway seems to clear this problem perhaps three weeks at best. If I do say 10-15 journeys in those following three weeks of 3 miles each (fairly typical for me), I'm back to bouncing down the road like I'm a new driver pulling off the traffic lights in fourth gear. It seems reasonable to me that consistently doing short journeys and nothing else might cause a problem if the car wasn't designed to be used that way. It seems manifestly unreasonable that I should have to drive 100 miles to nowhere (that's literally what I did) in order to get 40 miles of useful driving out of it. I've been through that cycle three times now.

If it were really necessary to use over half of every tank of petrol on "long" journeys just to keep the car running smoothly, I find it difficult to believe that Hyundai wouldn't be inundated with returns, especially given that there is no mention of this constraint when you buy the car.

I've got the car on a PCP finance deal and it turns out that due to the Affinity discount I got I'm not in negative equity with it, so my current plan is to just hand it back and replace it with the new Kona electric, which obviously won't suffer from the same incompatibility with short journeys. However before I do I thought I'd just ask a few questions of the community:

1. Has anyone else has had this problem with a recent Tucson (or any other model)? and if so, is there any other solution?

2. Hyundai's assertion (which they have put to me in so many words) that the car is expected to behave this way if you do 8-10 short journeys in a row. Does this sound (a) technically accurate and if so (b) reasonable? I don't know any real car enthusiasts but every layperson I ask agrees with me that if if the car actually does work this way then it amounts to a design fault.

My gut tells me that this isn't normal and my car is faulty, and that Hyundai aren't knowingly gaslighting me about it, they just don't have enough experience with these filters yet to diagnose the fault. Either way, unless anyone has any ideas (that don't invalidate the warranty) for how to fix it myself, it's going back to Hyundai and it'll have to be the next owner's problem.

Thanks for reading.
 

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seems it is more prone to clog due to temperature, see this:

Maybe add a GPF Cleaner additive:
 

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After many frustrating interactions with the AA and Hyundai servicing the likely root cause emerged - the new particulate filters which I'm told are standard on all new cars as of 2020. I have since seen the orange warning light on the dash telling me that filter is clogged and I need to drive the car up the motorway to clear it out, although I've only ever seen that light once - the usual experience is not the warning light but the loss of power and the bunny hopping.
Could i ask why the car has "New" filters?

I run a car (not Hyundai) with a DPF if i do a lot of town type driving it will automatically run the cleaning process, if i do a bit of dual carriageway driving every few days i never see the warning light, you don't ned to do lots of motorway miles every other day to keep it clean but you do need to get the car up to temperature and give it a good blast out every few days to keep it running smoothly.
 
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