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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been looking around for a performance brake upgrade for my '11 SE and haven't had any luck. The car is just so new there are not a lot of choices yet. I would like to swap the front rotors to some slotted and cross drilled/dimpled ones with some nice EBC ceramic pads. But there are not any aftermarket rotors avaiable yet for the 2011 models.

I did some checking and found the spec for the rotor is 11.8". From what I found, that size rotor has been used on Sonatas for several years. I was able to find a set of performance rotors for a 2009 Sonata whish is also listed as having 11.8" rotors.

Does anyone know if the '09 and '11 rotors are different. From what I found, they seem to be the same.
 

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QUOTE (Cerberus451 @ Jun 10 2010, 03:18 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=331750
I have been looking around for a performance brake upgrade for my '11 SE and haven't had any luck. The car is just so new there are not a lot of choices yet. I would like to swap the front rotors to some slotted and cross drilled/dimpled ones with some nice EBC ceramic pads. But there are not any aftermarket rotors avaiable yet for the 2011 models.

I did some checking and found the spec for the rotor is 11.8". From what I found, that size rotor has been used on Sonatas for several years. I was able to find a set of performance rotors for a 2009 Sonata whish is also listed as having 11.8" rotors.

Does anyone know if the '09 and '11 rotors are different. From what I found, they seem to be the same.
Unless you are taking the car to the track, you are better of with a GOOD blank and aggressive pads that match the heat range of your driving. Until you are doing repeated braking from triple digits you will not have to worry about slotting or drilling or dimpling.

I would take bolt pattern and rotor hat clearance. Being a new car, if its not your only car, I would pop the rotor off and take it with me to the parts shop.
 

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Is the performance that strong, or the brakes so weak that they need to be upgraded or improved? I'm only asking

because this is about the last thing I would do. I wonder if the Turbo model will come with high performance brakes?
 

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I actually find my SE brakes very sufficient....but then again I haven't driven her like I stole her YET
 

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I was hoping a Brembo Big Brake Kit would be available in the near future. Most of the reviews mentioned the brakes being so so. I just think it would look excellent especially on an SE plus the added stopping power especially during incliment weather.
 

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QUOTE (SilverNitrate @ Jun 10 2010, 04:02 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=331771
I was hoping a Brembo Big Brake Kit would be available in the near future. Most of the reviews mentioned the brakes being so so. I just think it would look excellent especially on an SE plus the added stopping power especially during incliment weather.
have you looked at the clearance? I don't think a 4 pot would fit under stock 18's
 

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Let's be honest here; what exactly are any of you who are wanting an "upgrade" really looking for? If what you *really* want is improved performance, then the very first thing you can and SHOULD do is replace the brake fluid with ATE Super Blue racing fluid. These new car come with some pretty competent braking systems and if you are experienceing any brake pedal fade, it's most likely due to the factory fluid boiling over. Next, if you want improved break pedal *feel*, replace the brake lines with steel bradded lines. You'd be surprised how much of a difference this would make. I would do both before replacing any pads, rotors, or calipers. In fact if you did replace the pads, rotors, and calipers, but not the fluid and lines, you'd be wasting your time. I've built and raced Porsches in the past, I've also sold Porsche performance products too; so I speak from first hand experience here.

Now if the *truth* is, you want to look cool, [be honest] then you can save a LOT of money and time by going on ebay and buy a set of "Brembo" faux brake caliper covers. They are SO real looking that unless you removed the wheels, you'd never know if they were fake. As for the rotors, there are some machine shops around that will slot and possibly cross-drill a factory set for you. But be warned, it wont be cheap and personally, I wouldn't trust any cross drilling of *factory* rotors on the track as they're likely to crack and may even fail catastrophically under heavy conditions..
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I find the brakes to be sufficient for a car of its size but upgraded brakes, IMO, are always a worthy upgrade. Besides, it wouldn't hurt shaving a few feet off the stock braking distance, and with ceramic pads, there is very little brake dust. Makes keeping the wheels clean easier between washes.

I really would love to find out if it is possible to do a brake conversion from the Genesis Coupe to the Sonata. The Genesis Coupe comes with Brembo's.

Thanks for the info Doc_V. I should of thought of swapping the brake lines with steel bradded, that is on my list of upgrades for my motorcycle. As for the rest, looking cool is not the main reason. If it looks good, then that is just a bonus. But I have done rotor swaps on a couple of vehicles in the past and it made a marked improvement in breaking power and distance. As for the faux "Brembo" covers, they sound cool, but I'm not into thoes kinds of upgrades.

Thanks for the responses'. I will just keep researching the options and let you know what I find.
 

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QUOTE (Doc_V @ Jun 10 2010, 04:07 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=331801
Let's be honest here; what exactly are any of you who are wanting an "upgrade" really looking for? If what you *really* want is improved performance, then the very first thing you can and SHOULD do is replace the brake fluid with ATE Super Blue racing fluid. These new car come with some pretty competent braking systems and if you are experienceing any brake pedal fade, it's most likely due to the factory fluid boiling over. Next, if you want improved break pedal *feel*, replace the brake lines with steel bradded lines. You'd be surprised how much of a difference this would make. I would do both before replacing any pads, rotors, or calipers. In fact if you did replace the pads, rotors, and calipers, but not the fluid and lines, you'd be wasting your time. I've built and raced Porsches in the past, I've also sold Porsche performance products too; so I speak from first hand experience here.

Now if the *truth* is, you want to look cool, [be honest] then you can save a LOT of money and time by going on ebay and buy a set of "Brembo" faux brake caliper covers. They are SO real looking that unless you removed the wheels, you'd never know if they were fake. As for the rotors, there are some machine shops around that will slot and possibly cross-drill a factory set for you. But be warned, it wont be cheap and personally, I wouldn't trust any cross drilling of *factory* rotors on the track as they're likely to crack and may even fail catastrophically under heavy conditions..
Tirerack.com is a great source for information on brake upgrades
 

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Great advice Doc_V! I have an SE as well and so far my only complaint with the brakes is pedal feel and may look into the metal brake lines.
Would I like more hp? absolutely; do I need better stopping power? only if I magically had more hp. This is by no means a performance car.
 

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Pads and fluid is all you need. They're vented rotors. You can drill the stock ones if you want a tiny bit better cooling, but otherwise I don't see how it would make that big of a difference. The car has ABS which is sometimes odd with a break upgrade. You don't know if you need to upgrade the front, rear or just both. With the Turbo Mr2s we used to track we'd just gut the fluid manifold to apply even pressure to the front and rear and that would give lots of brake force. Plus unless you are running really sticky tires you'll have far more issues with lockup before you need to upgrade the brakes. If you want something that just looks cool paint the calipers and drill the rotors.

I also have a Spec Miata full racecar and all we run in those are stock rotors, race pads, and race fluid and it'll take me from 110 to 60 in a no time to make turns, this is on a track where if I mess up it can be a disaster.
 

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An easy way to see if the rotors are the same: compare part numbers. If Hyundai is using the same rotors from the '09s, the part number will be the same. If they aren't the same, that's where the fun starts of figuring out what's different.
 

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QUOTE (hqen2000 @ Jun 13 2010, 08:02 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=332710
Pads and fluid is all you need. They're vented rotors. You can drill the stock ones if you want a tiny bit better cooling, but otherwise I don't see how it would make that big of a difference.
FYI- The truth behind cross drilled rotors is often misunderstood. First and foremost, it has nothing to do with cooling; that is a misnomer. The original intent of cross drilling rotors was solely for weight saving purposes. Porsche was the first to try this back in the early 1970's at Le Mans with the 917's. At that time Porsche was drilling holes in just about any piece of metal they could without sacrificing structural rigidity. Believe it or not, they even drilled holes in the key. It may not seem like a lot, but added up, every ounce counted, which can make a difference of a win or a loss over a 24 hour race.

In the case of cross drilled rotors, what Porsche found is it also added in the dissipation of gasses that built up from the brake pads which was *one* of the causes of brake fade in the early stages of the race. When new pads or "non-bedded" pads are used hard for the first few times, heat causes the adhesives, used to bind the brake pad material together, to release gasses. These gasses build up between the pad and rotor causing the pad to "float" and loose much of it's braking force. What Porsche found out that in addition to the weight savings from drilling rotors, the holes provided a means to evacuate the gasses and minimize brake fade. However, over time, they found out the down side of cross drilling rotors was it severely compromised the structural stability of the rotor. Throughout a race, brakes would "heat cycle" several times a lap going from glowing red-hot to much cooler temps. This caused the rotors to expand and contract over and over until the metal began to fracture. In some cases, the rotors would literally "explode". Fast forward and modern brake manufactures now know they can achieve the same "venting of gasses" by slotting the rotors, without sacrificing safety. Please reference the links in my previous post for more details; I'm too lazy to do it again.

If you drill holes in your factory rotors, you do so at your own risk.

If you look closely at a "vented" rotor, [which the Sonata has] they are actually *two* discs, sandwiched together with cooling vanes cast in between them. See fig [A] below. These vanes act like fan blades, pumping air between the discs to aid in cooling. The problem with drilling a factory rotor is it's almost impossible to do so, without hitting those vanes which further decreases the strength of the rotors. In the case of the cross drilled rotors found in most "big brake" upgrade kits, they are actually rotors from Porsche. Porsche took the time to "cast" the holes in between the vanes to insure no loss in structural stability. Even so, they too still develop small but visible fractures in each hole. See fig (I have personally witnessed this when I ran them on my Porsche race car.) Some race clubs have actually begun to ban crossed drilled rotors for this very reason; while even more are considering it.

In conclusion, I'll be the first to admit, cross drilled rotors look very cool and if all you do is normal driving on the streets, you'll probably be OK; but that's a lot of money to spend on just looking cool. That said, if you intend on doing any *actual* hard driving, your much better off with slotted-only rotors.

Fig [A]


Fig
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Ok, here is what I have found so far on the rotors. These are the rotors I was looking at that are for the '09 Sonata. SummitRacing '09 Sonata Rotors

They are listed as having the same outside diameter of 11.8 as the 2011's do.

Our 2011 wheel bolt pattern is 114.3 which is also the same as the '09.

Since all the specs seem to match between the '09 and '11 Sonata's, I think they would work.

Now, after reading the replies from everyone, I have decided to look at swapping out the brake fluid for something better and just swapping to ceramic pads for now.

I will wait for the rotor upgrade till much later.
 

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QUOTE (Cerberus451 @ Jun 16 2010, 09:54 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=333445
Ok, here is what I have found so far on the rotors. These are the rotors I was looking at that are for the '09 Sonata. SummitRacing '09 Sonata Rotors

They are listed as having the same outside diameter of 11.8 as the 2011's do.

Our 2011 wheel bolt pattern is 114.3 which is also the same as the '09.

Since all the specs seem to match between the '09 and '11 Sonata's, I think they would work.

Now, after reading the replies from everyone, I have decided to look at swapping out the brake fluid for something better and just swapping to ceramic pads for now.

I will wait for the rotor upgrade till much later.
You need to check the offset and rotor thickness too; otherwise the caliper may not align with, or fit over the rotor. Other than that, it looks like a good rotor. Also, don't forget the steel bradded brake lines. If you're going to do the other stuff, you might as well do them too. The brake lines will give you the maximum improvement in pedal feel. Just an FYI, when you go with harder pads, you are very likely to have brake squeal, as well as more dust. It's almost inevitable. Ceramic is not a guarantee this will not occur, so don't be surprised if it does.
 

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QUOTE (Cerberus451 @ Jun 10 2010, 02:18 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=331750
I would like to swap the front rotors to some slotted and cross drilled/dimpled ones with some nice EBC ceramic pads. But there are not any aftermarket rotors avaiable yet for the 2011 models.
These rotors are great for showing off yer $$/Bling, but don't have much effect on a regular car. In fact, they are often worse for most vehicles. Slots/holes mean less steel mass to soak up heat, which means faster brake fade and worse braking. Since they have less mass they get hotter, and slots introduce weak points, cracking along the slots is very common.

Your best and most cost-efficient option is getting some performance brake pads with the stock rotors. If you want improved rotors, you would need to get while new brake system with bigger rotors, brakes, calipers, etc, and a profesional fabricator to design and instal them. Assuming you find someone willing to take the risk of being sued if the fabricated brakes fail on a family car. This is why aftermarkets are very hesitant to touch brakes, and it takes awhile to hit the market. They wanna test the heck out of them first in our litigious society.

Tho, I thought the Sonata braking was already some of the best because of the low weight?

Doc v mentions some nice mods that would affect the system better than rotors.
 

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Go to autopartswarehouse.com , just buy a good set of EBC rotors and pads. Stock brakes work fine for everyday use.

Your stock rotors will probably warp out by 15-30k. Replace with aftermarkets EBC's. No need to change fluids and brake hoses, this isn't nascar and your not driving some rice burner.
 

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QUOTE (Doc_V @ Jun 15 2010, 12:12 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=333086
FYI- The truth behind cross drilled rotors is often misunderstood. First and foremost, it has nothing to do with cooling; that is a misnomer. The original intent of cross drilling rotors was solely for weight saving purposes. Porsche was the first to try this back in the early 1970's at Le Mans with the 917's. At that time Porsche was drilling holes in just about any piece of metal they could without sacrificing structural rigidity. Believe it or not, they even drilled holes in the key. It may not seem like a lot, but added up, every ounce counted, which can make a difference of a win or a loss over a 24 hour race.

In the case of cross drilled rotors, what Porsche found is it also added in the dissipation of gasses that built up from the brake pads which was *one* of the causes of brake fade in the early stages of the race. When new pads or "non-bedded" pads are used hard for the first few times, heat causes the adhesives, used to bind the brake pad material together, to release gasses. These gasses build up between the pad and rotor causing the pad to "float" and loose much of it's braking force. What Porsche found out that in addition to the weight savings from drilling rotors, the holes provided a means to evacuate the gasses and minimize brake fade. However, over time, they found out the down side of cross drilling rotors was it severely compromised the structural stability of the rotor. Throughout a race, brakes would "heat cycle" several times a lap going from glowing red-hot to much cooler temps. This caused the rotors to expand and contract over and over until the metal began to fracture. In some cases, the rotors would literally "explode". Fast forward and modern brake manufactures now know they can achieve the same "venting of gasses" by slotting the rotors, without sacrificing safety. Please reference the links in my previous post for more details; I'm too lazy to do it again.

If you drill holes in your factory rotors, you do so at your own risk.

If you look closely at a "vented" rotor, [which the Sonata has] they are actually *two* discs, sandwiched together with cooling vanes cast in between them. See fig [A] below. These vanes act like fan blades, pumping air between the discs to aid in cooling. The problem with drilling a factory rotor is it's almost impossible to do so, without hitting those vanes which further decreases the strength of the rotors. In the case of the cross drilled rotors found in most "big brake" upgrade kits, they are actually rotors from Porsche. Porsche took the time to "cast" the holes in between the vanes to insure no loss in structural stability. Even so, they too still develop small but visible fractures in each hole. See fig (I have personally witnessed this when I ran them on my Porsche race car.) Some race clubs have actually begun to ban crossed drilled rotors for this very reason; while even more are considering it.

In conclusion, I'll be the first to admit, cross drilled rotors look very cool and if all you do is normal driving on the streets, you'll probably be OK; but that's a lot of money to spend on just looking cool. That said, if you intend on doing any *actual* hard driving, your much better off with slotted-only rotors.

Fig [A]


Fig


Vented Rotor is not a xdrilled rotor. A vented rotor is merely a rotor which is hollow in the center, it adds a SIGNIFICANT amount of heat dissipation. As opposed to a solid rotor like some older cars do (and many newer cars do in the rear). I think you are generally better off just using a superior pad and fluid and changing the rotors and pads more often. This is what most people with track cars do (and racecars). But be careful and make sure you get pads that work cold. Some pads need to be warmed up. Also a lot of race pads make noise and produce a significant amount of brake dust over 'standard' pads.

Most people just want big brake kits to look cool though, not to provide superior stopping power. If you want better stopping power first look at your tires, then look at fluid. Is fade the concern? Or stopping distance? I'd say the vast majority of the time big brake kits provide reduced stopping ability because they just overbrake the front tires and the rear still suck. I know MOST of the braking is done in the front, but there is also a significant amount of braking done in the rear.

I had a supercharged MR2 racecar and the most we ever did with those is gut the stock brake manifold to provides equal braking pressure to the front and rear, but that depends on a bunch of different variables such as weight balance.

If you want to provide better performance for a car the first thing you should do is just get better tires. You can do fancy suspensions and brakes, I can take my stock sonata out with a set of R compound tires and walk allover you at the track. Big brakes are for cars with big power, which the Sonata is not. So I don't really get it anyway. With a car as underpowered as the sonata (relatively, if you are racing on a track) you should learn to drive faster and less on braking. The best racers often keep the braking to a minimum under most track conditions. You want to go fast not slow. Braking does the opposite of the accelerator so if you are using it too much you aint going fast.
 
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