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Did you click on the link on post #8 on this thread. Towing a trailer is not just about weight, it is about length of wheel base on car, length of trailer, tongue weight & %, anti-sway bars, brake controller on the trailer etc. You seem to have considered some of these items, but I would be very careful on what you do. You need to read the information on the link from post #8.
 

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bkjjohn thank you!
I decided to call Hyundai and get the official answer, and with my VIN he pulled up the info and it says it has the trailer package (which the dealer never mentioned) so I think the trailer package is default on the at least the 2020 2.0t models. There is a towing package the dealership offered but that is just a hitch + wiring.

I asked the Representative about where the certification label could be and said the door sill. Since its not there i'm going to call the dealership. I'll update with my findings.

Thanks for the reply!
Yeah, the wiring is there on all of them for a 4 pin hookup. Then the dealer sends it out to do the hitch.
 

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Thanks rckymtnhy
I looked at post #8 on this thread and it scares me.
"More Free Advise.... Log into an RV forum (like RV.Net Open Roads Forum: Travel Trailers ) and ask how big of Travel Trailer you can tow with a Sanfa Fe. Then, watch all the feedback come back with Don't Do It! "

That link in the post though basically just says people will tell you not to tow with a Santa Fe. However you can see other posts on here where people have successfully towed with the Santa Fe.

The 2500lb dry camper I booked seems like it might be too much.
I am trying hard to make sure I am doing this safe, it has been a very difficult journey though.
The camper I rented doesn't have a weight distribution hitch or an anti-sway bar which concerns me. If you guys think that this is too much for my Santa Fe I won't attempt it (I am leaning towards this).

I'm not seeing anything in the manual about wheel base, I found an interesting forum thread on it but it kind of seems like there isn't a rule for it.
Reply #5 seems valuable
"
The most significant factors involved in tow safety for a conventionally hitched trailer are:

1. Trailer weight vs. tow vehicle tow ratings. Mfr tow ratings evaluate the capacity of truck drive train strength, suspension, brakes, and engine and cooling system adequacy. Trailer weight is gotten, if you own the rig, by weighing it on a scale or, if you do not own it, by using the mfr's gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) as a good, conservative approximation.

2. Trailer balance. Trailer balance is determined by the position of the trailer's center of gravity (cg) with respect to the hitch coupler. Stability demands that it be well forward so that at the very least 10% of the trailer's weight bears on the hitch. Think of a trailer-tow truck rig as a seesaw. The trailer CG sits at one end, the hitch bail is the fulcrum/pivot, and the truck's rear axle sits at the other. The further that trailer CG is from the hitch, the more leverage it has over the truck and the more unstable the tow is. The hitch/tongue weight's percentage of trailer weight is a measure of that lever arm, the more that bears on the hitch, the smaller the arm that the trailer can exert.

3. Type of hitch. Trailer tongue weight exerts a force on the truck behind the rear axle, pivoting the truck about its rear axle and lifting the front axle. This act to increase the oversteer of the truck making it unstable with respect to lateral forces like steering or trailer yaw (sway). Weight Distributing (WD) hitches are design to force the transfer of the hitch weight forward to the front axle of a truck to return it to its normal attitude and under-steer condition and resistance to lateral forces. Most use spring bars between the ball mount of the hitch and the A-frame of the trailer to pivot the truck forward in the vertical plane.

4. Hitch sway control. This is added to WD hitches two general ways. It is added on in the form of a friction bar connecting the hitch ball mount with the trailer A-frame. The other is to design the anti-sway into the operation of the weight distribution. I greatly prefer the latter way as employed in Reese Dual Cam, Equal-i-zer, and Hensley Arrow hitch systems.

5. Truck and trailer tire resistance to lateral forces. This is a function of tire design, weight rating, and proper inflation. My Bronco uses big BFG all terrain LT 31x10.50x15R m+s gum-balls inflated to max pressure as indicated on the sidewalls for towing. I have TS tires on the trailer tho LT would do as well -- P rated tires are not recommended.

6. Trailer lateral surface area Long trailers naturally have large sides for lateral aerodynamic forces -- cross winds or passing truck shock waves in other words. The yawing effect is resisted by all of the foregoing countermeasures and the simple tactic of slow down in cross winds!

As far as trailer length is concerned, it is useful only as a indication of general GVWR and, of course the #6 factor.

« Last Edit: October 29, 2009, 03:16:43 PM by Carl L »"



Still trying to do my homework on this, any thoughts are appreciated.
 

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Thank you bkjjohn, I'll take your advice and only tow with a WDH. Also thanks for the link, your replies have been super helpful.
 

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Some info on wheelbase:
Wheelbase. The wheelbase is the measurement from the front axle to rear axle of the vehicle. The longer the wheelbase, the less likely that the weight of the trailer/boat will push down on the rear axle and lift the front end. A longer wheelbase also has the added effect of providing more control over the rig. As a general rule of thumb, the first 110 inches of wheelbase allow for a 20-foot trailer. For each additional four inches of wheelbase length, you get one foot more in trailer length.

Really good explanation from Randy W on iRV2:
"Towability is a combination of lengths and weights and countermeasures. Wheelbases are like pivot points and the distances between them are like levers. If you push sideways on the rear corner of the TT, the wheels act like a fulcrum and the torque moment is coupled to the hitch ball, the next pivot point. The force X distance product for each end will be the same so the shorter the distance from the rear corner to the wheels, the less force is applied to the hitch through the longer moment arm. At the hitch, the next fulcrum point would be the rear axle of the tow vehicle, again the distance between the hitch and the rear axle becomes the moment that gets transfered to the front wheels. This is where the wheelbase comes in to play, the longer the wheelbase, the less force is applied to the front wheels. As far as weights go, if the tow vehicle weights more that the trailer the tail can't wag the dog, however if the trailer weighs more than the tow vehicle, the tail can wag the dog. The countermeasures I refer to are the WD hitchs and anti sway devices that work on dampening the motion around the hitch ball.

So when do all of these items come into play - think of a semi passing you in slow motion (he is only going 1mph faster than you) His bow wake hits the rear of the TT pushing it towards the side of the road, that force causes the hitch to move the opposite way and that causes your tow vehicle to want to steer for the ditch. As the bow wake moves forward along the TT the force is placed directly on the hitch and now you feel like you are being sucked toward the truck. When the bow wake hits the side of your truck you want to head for the ditch again. If the tow vehicle is heavy with respect to the TT then the effcts of the bow wake are minimized, however if your tail can wag the dog well .........

So, what is the best combination? That is hard to say, a heavy tow vehicle/light trailer will hide any wheelbase issues better than a light tow vehicle/ heavy trailer. On the other hand, the amount of rear overhang on either the trailer or tow vehicle could be of concern. The only real combination to stay away from is a long heavy TT with a long rear overhang and short light tow vehicle."

So, with a 108.9 wheelbase on the Santa Fe you could "theoretically" tow a 20 foot trailer, but as Randy W explains, lots of other factors come into play. Hope this helps in your decision making. Best regards.
 

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Thanks rckymtnhy,
That's good information for me to consider.
I ended up canceling the rental and now I am looking at renting popups or maybe buying a popup like
Which is 1801 lbs and 20.42 ft.

Ideally I would rather go a little bigger like below, any thoughts on if it would be an issue? I know its a bit longer than my wheelbase should tow but I would get a WD hitch.
Which is 2221 lbs and 23.42 ft.

Anyway, I'm just in the thinking phase.
Again, thanks for the information all!
 
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