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Last week the temp was down to -25 C and when my son left the front passenger side and closed the door the seat belt jammed the edge of the arm rest and the pillar - split the vinyl on the edge of the arm rest. Any body find that some of their seat belt re-tractors are slow? or should i just blame the weather conditions - the vehicle was warm and driven for 45 minutes so it felt pretty warm inside. I'll have to take a pic - its not pretty.
 

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The retractors on my 2007 are a bit slow all the time and I like it like that. Otherwise it is pulling hard on your chest and that wares thin real quick on a long trip. When I remove my belt it sometimes gets folded over so the retractor will not pull it in. In this last case even with a heavier pull the belt would not retract. Just have to watch before the door is closed I guess. Hope you can get the damage repaired when the weather warms up.

Also the retractor is mounted at the base of the post and there is not insulation between the retractor and the outside metal so in cold weather it will be considerably colder than the inside of the vehicle.
 

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Extend the belt and spray it with silicone spray and let it retract - that lubricates inside the inertia reel but silicone won't soil your clothes - repeat if necessary.
 

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I have to be very careful about letting my belts go or they'll bang into the B pillar with considerable speed if I let them go. Despite this, I don't find them to 'tug' when just being worn. In fact my only complaint is that they don't adjust high enough but I've gotten used to it.
 

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QUOTE (Ruperts Trooper @ Dec 17 2010, 04:08 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=380938
Extend the belt and spray it with silicone spray and let it retract - that lubricates inside the inertia reel but silicone won't soil your clothes - repeat if necessary.

Sorry but i have to disagree with this recommendation, although it is well-meant.
First, you are coating the seat belt webbing with silicone. What will this do to the life/strength of the webbing initially, in 2 years, or over the life span of the vehicle.

In most vehicles, the silicone wouldn't actually reach the mechanism to lubricate anything mechanical. The belt webbing typically wraps around a plastic spool. They all have some form of sides on those spools to prevent any run-off of the belt. Some have full sides on those spools.

Seat belts, as a life safety component, are considered non-serviceable items by most manufacturers meaning they are never "repaired" if anything goes wrong, and are only subject to full component replacement.

Should anything degrade the belt suddenly (for example: dog chews partially or completely through one, a cut, chemical contamination etc) or over time (marring, fraying, etc) and either FRONT seat belt has to be replaced, you better sit down when you get the invoice. Most new vehicles (including our recent model Hyundai's) have seat belt pre-tensioners in the mechanism. The pre-tensioner works with the air bag system and when activated detonates a small charge in the seat belt retractor that tightens the belt removing any slack in it, before your body travels too far.
http://auto.howstuffworks.com/car-driving-...s/seatbelt4.htm

Bills of $700 plus to replace one front seatbelt would not be unusual. Because of the explosive charge in it, it could also be subjected to ground-only shipping, meaning you could be waiting for a while.
Seat belts in the rear seating positions do not typically (at this time) have pre-tensioners and are less expensive.

If you're curious as to where things are now (in advanced vehicles) but it tends to trickle down with time to other vehicles in the future to help reduce injury and survivability in crashes, check this video on the new PRE-SAFE BRAKE AND RETENTION SYSTEM.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v4PF74_Y_bM&NR=1
 

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QUOTE (Haith @ Dec 18 2010, 07:47 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=381131
Sorry but i have to disagree with this recommendation, although it is well-meant.
First, you are coating the seat belt webbing with silicone. What will this do to the life/strength of the webbing initially, in 2 years, or over the life span of the vehicle.

In most vehicles, the silicone wouldn't actually reach the mechanism to lubricate anything mechanical. The belt webbing typically wraps around a plastic spool. They all have some form of sides on those spools to prevent any run-off of the belt. Some have full sides on those spools.
Sorry, but I have to disagree with your disagreement. :grin:

Spraying dry silicone on a seat belt that's slow to retract is something I've been doing for a very long time, usually at oil change time along with other basic maintenance chores. Not much is needed - a quick, light spray along both sides of the belt as it's held out through the open door will suffice. Dry silicone will not harm the belt, and it was actually recommended as a maintenance item on several cars I've owned, along with spraying the rubber door gaskets to keep them from sticking in wet, freezing weather. It lubricates the belt to reduce friction with itself as it winds onto the spool, as well as any guides both outside and inside the B- or C-pillar.

As was previously mentioned, some may have a problem with the belt keeping slightly greater tension on the chest. I can see why a woman may not like it, but I do because it helps keep me from slouching in the seat and actually makes me more comfortable that way.
 

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QUOTE (Haith @ Dec 18 2010, 01:47 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=381131
Sorry but i have to disagree with this recommendation, although it is well-meant.
First, you are coating the seat belt webbing with silicone. What will this do to the life/strength of the webbing initially, in 2 years, or over the life span of the vehicle.

In most vehicles, the silicone wouldn't actually reach the mechanism to lubricate anything mechanical. The belt webbing typically wraps around a plastic spool. They all have some form of sides on those spools to prevent any run-off of the belt. Some have full sides on those spools.

Seat belts, as a life safety component, are considered non-serviceable items by most manufacturers meaning they are never "repaired" if anything goes wrong, and are only subject to full component replacement.

Should anything degrade the belt suddenly (for example: dog chews partially or completely through one, a cut, chemical contamination etc) or over time (marring, fraying, etc) and either FRONT seat belt has to be replaced, you better sit down when you get the invoice. Most new vehicles (including our recent model Hyundai's) have seat belt pre-tensioners in the mechanism. The pre-tensioner works with the air bag system and when activated detonates a small charge in the seat belt retractor that tightens the belt removing any slack in it, before your body travels too far.
http://auto.howstuffworks.com/car-driving-...s/seatbelt4.htm

Bills of $700 plus to replace one front seatbelt would not be unusual. Because of the explosive charge in it, it could also be subjected to ground-only shipping, meaning you could be waiting for a while.
Seat belts in the rear seating positions do not typically (at this time) have pre-tensioners and are less expensive.

If you're curious as to where things are now (in advanced vehicles) but it tends to trickle down with time to other vehicles in the future to help reduce injury and survivability in crashes, check this video on the new PRE-SAFE BRAKE AND RETENTION SYSTEM.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v4PF74_Y_bM&NR=1
Well it works - and is used routinely in the UK - I think it was recommended in the owners manual for the GM cars I used to run.
 

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well everyone has their own point of view which of course they are entitled to, lets leave it at that before the arguments get out of hand :liebe011:
 

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QUOTE (Montego @ Dec 18 2010, 03:26 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=381153
well everyone has their own point of view which of course they are entitled to, lets leave it at that before the arguments get out of hand :liebe011:
I hadn't intended that it would "get out of hand", nor did I think the others would - healthy technical debate is important for the progress of science.
 
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