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2019 Hyundai Kona EV Limited
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I purchased a Hyundai Kona EV Limited on March 12, 2020 for $40,000. After 3 weeks, ~600 miles, the 100% charge range was only about 215 miles, well below the advertised range of 258 miles.
To be clear, this isn't about "driving style", I am saying when you fully charge at 100%, the range on the dash indicator is stated as 216 miles and that's about as far as you can go. When it was new ( a whopping 800 miles ago) it was at 260 miles of range. Is this typical for EVs. Do Tesla's and other EVs lose 16% of their "EPA" range in a few hundred miles.
Yes, I brought it to the Dealer and to Hyundai Motor America at the national support center. After nearly 2 weeks of looking at the car, everyone denies there is an issue - "the car is within specifications" I am told.
Anyone else experience this kind of degradation in range?
 

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I do not have an EV, but i have never heard of an EV losing range anywhere near that fast. I thought it usually takes some years before it loses some percentage of range.

I have read about setting the max charge at like 80%, as to preserve the battery life, not going to 100% unless you need it. Especially if doing fast charging. But obviously you have explored this with them extensively already.
 

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2019 Hyundai Kona EV Limited
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I do not have an EV, but i have never heard of an EV losing range anywhere near that fast. I thought it usually takes some years before it loses some percentage of range.

I have read about setting the max charge at like 80%, as to preserve the battery life, not going to 100% unless you need it. Especially if doing fast charging. But obviously you have explored this with them extensively already.
Thanks, I am aware of that also but since it has only been charged a handful of times, it's really concerning...thanks
 

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2016 Elantra GT and 2011 Elantra Touring
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Maybe the computer is taking into account your past driving style and trying represent the range as a number that is realistic with the way you drive. This is what a range estimator does with a gasoline powered automobile.
 

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2019 Hyundai Kona EV Limited
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Really good rational explanation, unfortunately 1. driving style has been conservative/ECO at Level 3 a lot and 2. this would have been a good thing for Hyundai to say but they didn't, instead they insist that this is a "normal" range...but thanks
 

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I remember Hyundai getting in trouble with the Elantra a few years ago. The 2011-2016 series. They were claiming some EPA mileage number that people were not achieving , maybe it was like 40mpg? I think they ended up in a lawsuit or something and people got a rebate or something to make up the estimated gas cost difference. So I would think there must be some basis of recourse for advertised range numbers versus actual.
 

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A few notes, based on my EV experience (3 year lease of Kia Soul EV, followed by 1 year ownership of Niro EV):
  • The algorithm is adaptive. It will modify the estimate based on your driving style
  • If it’s cold, you will see reduced estimates
  • If you regularly charge to 100%, you will accelerate the natural deterioration of the battery capacity.
When I owned the Soul, the range was so low that I charged (Level 2) to 100% every night. The maximum range kept reducing to the point that, at about 2-2.5 years, it was below 70% of the published max. Apparently, 70% was the magic number for the warranty, and Kia replaced the entire battery. It took about 2 weeks, and they provided a rental.

With the Niro, I charge when the battery level is around 20%, and I only charge to 80%. About once a month, or when needed for a planned trip, I charge to 100%. From everything I’ve read, and my experience seems to support, this is the optimal charge formula for extending EV battery life. In my case, I routinely get 190-200 miles at 80%, and about 240 miles at 100%. And the Niro nearly always over delivers - I typically can drive over 250 miles on a full charge (unless I’m going 80 on the freeway). And I typically drive the car like a go cart: Sport or Normal mode nearly always, rarely in ECO.

Good luck
 

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My 20 Kona Ultimate when fully charged (once) comes in at 263 miles. I'm in the 80% charge club, that usually comes in around 240. There are some got la's on that. If the defroster is on, that kicks in the heater, miles will drop to 212. Turn defroster off goes back to 240. I'm just getting to the air conditioner season, got the car in January, no telling what that will do to the range. I live in Phoenix so there's no getting around air conditioning. During the winter I could get away with using the heated seats, didn't seem to effect the range. Try making sure EVERYTHING is off, see what that does.
 

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2019 Hyundai Kona EV Limited
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
A few notes, based on my EV experience (3 year lease of Kia Soul EV, followed by 1 year ownership of Niro EV):
  • The algorithm is adaptive. It will modify the estimate based on your driving style
  • If it’s cold, you will see reduced estimates
  • If you regularly charge to 100%, you will accelerate the natural deterioration of the battery capacity.
When I owned the Soul, the range was so low that I charged (Level 2) to 100% every night. The maximum range kept reducing to the point that, at about 2-2.5 years, it was below 70% of the published max. Apparently, 70% was the magic number for the warranty, and Kia replaced the entire battery. It took about 2 weeks, and they provided a rental.

With the Niro, I charge when the battery level is around 20%, and I only charge to 80%. About once a month, or when needed for a planned trip, I charge to 100%. From everything I’ve read, and my experience seems to support, this is the optimal charge formula for extending EV battery life. In my case, I routinely get 190-200 miles at 80%, and about 240 miles at 100%. And the Niro nearly always over delivers - I typically can drive over 250 miles on a full charge (unless I’m going 80 on the freeway). And I typically drive the car like a go cart: Sport or Normal mode nearly always, rarely in ECO.

Good luck
Thanks, great info, very helpful. What it says to me is the published, advertised range, is a bit of a hoax: it should state something like: On a clear night at 70 degrees, assuming you haven't previously driven over 50 mph and not used any accessories, (heat, a/c, radio, defroster, lights, etc) and you only previously charged to a degraded state, you might get a one time 258 mile range at 100% charge which is bad for your battery. Unfortunately, there is a lot of info on not charging to 100% but the rapid degradation in range when using the car normally is very disappointing and should be better communicated in my view. NEW BUYERS BEWARE.
Thanks though, your experience is well stated and explains a lot.
 
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