Hyundai Forums banner

1 - 20 of 58 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hey everyone. new to the forum. Purchased a new 2018 Elantra Value back in February. Went to dealer's service a few days ago for a few reasons; one being a barely audible noise that I hear when accelerating usually around 3rd gear topping just over 2000 rpms. Very hard to hear but definitely there. I read some older threads but thought I'd open it up again. Dealer said that that they did hear it and replaced the knock sensor and didn't hear noise after. Well, the noise is still there and my paperwork doesn't show the part replacement and interestingly says couldn't duplicate noise. Why I didn't question this at the time is another story; I had other battles to fight with them. I have another appointment in a few days and this will obviously be brought up again. So, any advice on this? I don't think I should have to just live with this noise.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
While waiting for your appointment, you might want to try using another fuel brand (I'm assuming your Elantra has gasoline or Petrol engine). Try to get the exact (or nearest) Octane rating indicated on your manual.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Hey, thanks for the quick reply. I've only used BP 87 octane in the car since day 1, which is supposed to be top tier. Are you saying I should go higher?...89...93?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
Hi wheele1. I would neither tell you to go higher or lower octane rating. Instead, kindly check the manual on the recommended Octane rating of your car and gas up on that exact (or within that) rating if possible.

The latest engine designs are employing rather very precise engineering that's why I think that veering away from
their recommended fuel octane rating might cause some problems.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Micob, Sorry...didn't mean to sound arrogant in the last post. Manual states 87. That's what I've used. I could try going higher but that would definitely hurt my pocket.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
Hi Rwheele1, no worries, you didn't sound arrogant at all. Anyway, if you are already using the recommended Octane rating (87) there shouldn't be problems at all. Hmm, you could try two things:

1. Change fuel brand (same 87 Octane rating)
2. Change to higher Octane rating

Keep us updated. Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,803 Posts
Only thing the anti-knock sensor can do is to retard the spark advance and can only be retarded so much to keep the engine running. Higher gears put more of a load on an engine, more air/fuel in the combustion chamber, 2.0L engine has a compression ratio of 11:1, that ping you are hearing is detonation, heat of compression is causing it to preignite.

When the piston is trying to up that ping is causing the piston to go down again, really stresses your rod and main bearings.

Do you keep track of your fuel economy, ha, know many people that go by the cost of fuel at the pump. True cost of fuel is dividing the cost by your mpg, cost of fuel per mile. For me, using ethanol free 91 octane is cheaper and keeps my engine a lot happier.

And just because that pump says 87 octane doesn't mean you are getting it, if in the USA with an EPA going nuts with over 155 different blends of fuel buying gas today is like buying a lottery ticket. If E10, and your gas station is not constantly stirring the tank, may only be getting E5 or even E0!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
245 Posts
I've heard of some things which can sometimes mimic ping/knock: Vibrating exhaust manifold heat shields, loose/cracked engine mounts, and other nearby things which are subject to strong engine vibrations. If you try switching to a high octane gas as an experiment for a month and the noise stays away completely, then you'd know it's definitely pre-detonation ping and not some mechanical vibration on the outside of the engine mimicking ping. If it does turn out to be ping due to insufficient octane, then there's not much you can do about that except for continue to use higher octane than 87, if you want the ping gone. If you complain to Hyundai, they might do something to adjust the timing & fuel-air mix in your ECU which will banish the ping, but it will probably also reduce your fuel economy.

I had a ping issue with my Accent, which has an even higher compression ratio than the Elantra. I never complained to Hyundai about it because I wanted to try to eliminate every possibility that I might have contributed to cause the problem first. I was on the verge of having a shop clean the intake valves with a media blaster when Hyundai issued a recall notice to me for a ECU reflash. There was no mention of ping/knock in the recall, but after they performed the reflash the pinging was gone. But so was my outstanding MPG performance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
I have a 2018 Elantra SEL and i noticed the same exact noise you are describing. It was most noticeable accelerating in 3rd gear but i could hear it accelerating in all gears and it was a little worse driving up a hill or slope. I did take it in for service and the tech told me before he even drove it it is a common sound in these cars. He did drive it a couple miles just to verify the sound and make sure it was in the realm of "normal". He told me the reason for it but im having a little of a hard time remembering it. Something about carbons being burned off at higher RPM's causing the pinging, rattle maybe but dont take my word for it. He did recommend some sort of fuel cleaning service every 20K miles of so but otherwise it is what it is. I am by no means very knowledgeable with engines so take it for what its worth. Ive had the car for 2 months and has 1700 miles on it and have not noticed it get any worse. i could hear it when i got the car and thinking about it my old 09 corolla did the same thing but maybe to a little lesser extent. Hope you get it worked out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,803 Posts
Carbon buildup is as old as steam powered vehicles like ships and locomotives using wood or coal. Build on on the boiler pipes resulting in thermal insulation, and had to be cleaned off by hand. Different story in IC engines, builds up inside of the combustion chamber increasing the compression ratio causing detonation.

Ha, back in the 50's, could buy a vehicle with 40K on it for practically next to nothing, would buy a Victor overhaul gasket kit for around three bucks, just take the engine completely apart and clean off the carbon without spending a dime on it. Run like new again. Today, kids are playing video games.

E10 must be relatively new in the USA, have a 1986 Volvo outdrive on my boat, has a sign on the gas filler, DO NOT USE ETHANOL, what the heck is ethanol? Sure found out when this country switched on in Wisconsin, E10 completely destroyed the entire fuel system and this is all you can buy, rumors about our corporation farms started all this. But small engine manufacturers, Mercury, and Harley Davidson screamed about this, so could buy ethanol free gas, but only in 91 octane. Rebuilt my entire fuel system so I could drive it again.

Just a few years ago, owners manual said you cannot use E15, E10 is maximum, what's the difference? Both are heterogeneous and hygroscopic, E10 will just rot out your fuel system a bit slower than E15, Elantra says you can use E15, but if you use E85, not only problems, but will void your warranty.

EPA says E85 will only cut your fuel economy by 27%, just about everyone I talked to with flex vehicles, more like 40-50%, sure not saving money buying E85, have to use a lot more stainless steel in these things. Obsoleted practically all pre-ethanol vehicles. eat through gas lines resulting in fires, really don't hear about this.

Elantra also states only to use top tier gasoline, but try and find a definition of exactly what top tier gas is. Suppose to reduce carbon buildup, kind of tantamount to removing a grease stain on your whit shirt with water.

Back in the 50's, the cheapest gas you could buy was aviation 80 octane fuel, lots of these planes left today, don't dare put E10 in these things, really would have a fire, still the cheapest gas you can buy but with politics, running over six bucks a gallon.

Seem like the governments are way ahead in changing our fuel, and the manufacturers are trailing behind. Did this in 1972 with unleaded gas, could still buy it, price was three times as high, but the lead content was reduced to about 10%, your exhaust valves did not like this.

Ha, ever since 1972, we had a fuel crisis, even leading to war, this new guy says we have plenty of it and can even export it.

While ethanol free top tier 91 octane is a lot cheaper to produce than E-10, charging more for it, more politics and not nears the moisture and poor mix problems.

Look at E10 as being penny wise and pound foolish. Got bad mixes before, not only destructive to your engine and fuel system, but to prevent detonation, had to drive in a very low gear getting as low as 17 mpg instead of 42!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
285 Posts
Check your oil level so you can at least rule one thing out. I agree with the others above about trying another brand of Top Tier gas. Could be you got a bad batch from your usual station, etc.

I've come across several newer cars, from Toyota, to Nissan, to Ford, that ping under load. My high mileage older vehicles don't have this issue. It's interesting that the owner's manual actually recommends periodic usage of a fuel additive. Looks like Hyundai knows their engines have a tendency to form deposits.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Wow...great forum group! Just got back from work and just read all your replies, much appreciated. My next appointment is this Saturday and will raise the issue again. I originally thought the issue was the exhaust heat shield; it just had that kind of sound. If not solved after that, I'll first try changing gas brand. Then, 93 if the sound remains. I'll keep you posted. I'm not letting this one go.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,803 Posts
Looks like Hyundai knows their engines have a tendency to form deposits.
You show me anything that burns carbon that does not carbon up, ironically jet engines are the least problem, have red hot flame blasting the rear turbines to burn that stuff off. Even an natural gas furnace carbons up, but not nearly as bad as automotive, worse are two cycle engines.

Been using additives for year, not a Seafoam salesperson, but the first on the market. In my engines, 1 ounce is key, 1 once per quart of engine oil about 300 miles before changing the oil, 1 ounce per gallon of gas, once every 4,000 miles, to really clean the intake valves, pour a can directly into the throttle body with the engine at idle, slowly, but will kill the engine, let it sit for about 20 minutes, then start it up and watch the smoke pour out the exhaust.

New stuff made this more difficult, TB's use to be straight up. now horizontal, just took a cap and drilled a hole in it with a small neoprene tube I can angle it to pour it in slowly. Do this about every 25K miles.

Another unsolved over 100 year problem is your radiator compounded by adding a condenser in front of it, a giant bug collector that gets jammed in the vents restricting air flow. Really made this job miserable with unibody, can no longer do this from the top, But if you do not keep this clean, and with stupid R-134a whose pressure increases at an exponential rate, your compressor will be overworked, put stress on your water pump, weakest link, not only get engine overheating, but a leaky water pump as well.

Gone over 200K miles without AC and water pump problems just by keeping it clean. Engine overheating in an aluminum engine is a major disaster.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
NicholasD....should I be experiencing this noise with under 700 miles on the o. I believe this was happening from mile 1. I just never noticed it it. I was probably more preoccupied with ApplePlay.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,803 Posts
NicholasD....should I be experiencing this noise with under 700 miles on the o. I believe this was happening from mile 1. I just never noticed it it. I was probably more preoccupied with ApplePlay.
Certainly not carbon build up, how long have you been buying gas from the BP station? But can always get low ethanol, did you talk to them?

Not only low on ethanol, was one case where the guy filling the station tanks put diesel fuel into it or even get water.. Do you just let this go or file a complaint with the oil company?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,287 Posts
I agree with others to try another gas station. That would rule it out as the issue. I have gotten bad gas from a Brand name gas station.

I have had my Elantra SE one year in February. Quiet as a mouse/no pinging. I had gallons of Lucus Fuel Treatment left over from another car. I add about 1.5 oz per 5 gallons of gas. Makes the Elantra very quiet every time I add it to the gas. Not saying you need this, but is my strategy along with 7.5k Techron to keep fuel system working properly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
847 Posts
...It's interesting that the owner's manual actually recommends periodic usage of a fuel additive. Looks like Hyundai knows their engines have a tendency to form deposits.
They recommend a specific fuel additive, techron, and only if you are not using Top Tier gasoline. If you are using Top Tier gasoline, it already has the right detergent/additive package, and you will not need to use Techron.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
Here in the Philippines, we have a gas station that uses Techron as their additive. While I didn't have issues with their unleaded gasoline with Techron on my Toyota Corolla, I am a bit averse with their Diesel (with Techron) on my Hyundai; my diesel fuel consumption comparatively increases (meaning lower mileage). I seem to get good mileage on my Hyundai when I use SeaOil Diesel with STP additive here.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
Let's get real here people. This is a brand new car. I own 4 cars: CR-V, Jetta, BMW 3 series, and now an Elantra. I've been filling up at the same station for a long time with no issues. I'm still not convinced this a fuel problem but it may be. I'll keep you posted.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,803 Posts
Reason I was given why they got rid of the AT dipstick, didn't want people pouring windshield washer fluid in that little tiny hole. So why didn't they get rid of that oil fill cap, a lot easier to pour in windshield wiper fluid in there.

Ha, expecting that oil dipstick tube to disappear as well.
 
1 - 20 of 58 Posts
Top