Hyundai Forums banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Kia, Hyundai rise, Japanese fall in J.D. Power quality study

The twin South Korean brands, Kia and Hyundai, have moved to the top of the pack in the latest J.D. Power and Associates Initial Quality Study, the most closely watched gauge of quality in auto manufacturing.

The Kia brand ranked second behind the top brand, Porsche, which took first for the third year in a row. And the Hyundai brand moved up to fourth place, right behind third-place Jaguar. Both Kia and Hyundai are owned by the same company, Hyundai.

"We believe the J.D. Power report leaves no doubt that Kia builds world-class vehicles, and the results are especially gratifying as the IQS study truly reflects the voice of our customers," says Michael Sprague, executive vice president of Kia Motors America.

The ranking represents a turnabout from the many years in which Japanese brands have dominated the listings. Overall, Power says Japanese brands now collectively are below the industry average for the first time in 29 years. The highest Japanese brand is now Nissan's Infiniti in fifth place, up from below average last year.

"For so long, Japanese brands have been viewed by many as the gold standard in vehicle quality," says Renee Stephens, a Power vice president, in a statement. "While the Japanese automakers continue to make improvements, we're seeing other brands, most notably Korean makes, really accelerating the rate of improvement."

Detroit's Big 3 makers fared generally well. Chevrolet placed highest among traditional U.S. brands at seventh, followed by Ford's Lincoln in eighth. Both were ahead of Lexus and Toyota, which placed ninth and 10th.

The index is based on responses from 84,000 drivers who have bought or leased a 2015 car or truck model. It is based on defects or problems in the first 90 days of ownership. Another Power study covers how vehicles hold up in the longer term.

Overall, the study finds that cars are getting better. There was a 3% improvement in this year's study compared to last year. That translates to the finding of 112 problems per 100 cars, down from 116.

At the opposite end of the quality scale, Fiat was the worst car for quality, followed by Daimler's Smart car and the Chrysler brand.

Automakers that fared poorly were often tripped up by balky or complicated infotainment systems that frustrated owners. For the third year, Power says connectivity and entertainment systems were the biggest trouble spot. Buyers complained of phones that couldn't be paired to the Bluetooth systems or voice recognition systems that didn't understand them.
 

·
Registered
‘19 Santa Fe Ultimate 2.0T FWD (Machine Gray/Espresso Gray)
Joined
·
1,545 Posts
Impressive!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,706 Posts
I don't put a lot of faith in those studies.
 
  • Like
Reactions: guybo

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,346 Posts
Gotta realize, these are INITIAL QUALITY surveys. You buy the car, and within a few weeks you get a survey.

I can't see how any car maker can fail an Initial Quality survey unless they really missed the mark.

I can understand how Hyundai has finally beaten Toyota in this survey. I like the build of my Accent much more than the build of my Scion, even though the Scion will run rings around the Accent.

But then speed and agility aren't everything if the car isn't screwed together properly. Look at VW :(
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
838 Posts
I've owned quite a few new vehicles, mostly Ford, a couple of GMC's and sadly, even a couple of Dodges, until I switched to Toyota, then to Lexus and now the Santa Fe. Almost every Ford I bought included scheduling the first service visit to fix what was discovered wrong during the test drive. Virtually every "American" vehicle had to be returned to the dealer within the first month of ownership for some kind of issue. Ranging from minor, like trim not installed correctly, to major, top end rebuild of engine (yes, it was a new vehicle). The first Toyota I bought did not require a single return to the dealer for a warranty issue. Neither did our Lexus. The Santa Fe has only had one issue, the bluetooth didn't function correctly and the radio head unit was replaced solving the problem. It has been my experience that if the vehicle proves to be reliable in the first few months of ownership, it probably will be a reliable vehicle. I am certainly hoping for that for the Santa Fe.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
Discussion Starter #8

·
Registered
Joined
·
285 Posts
Hyundai and Kia are trying to become premium brands. To do that they have to give exceptional value for money else people won't try their higher end vehicles. So now 'we' Hyundai and Kia owners are on the top of the wave. We might have the best vehicles ever because H&K want us to become their ambassadors. H&K want to prove they can compete with all American AND European AND Japanese brands. They already are doing good business so they have a decent filled war-chest. Hyundai is #2 in China. Old numbers but in January 2014 Hyundai sold 175.000 cars in China. 175 thousand. In the US that was around 44.000 for that month in that year. The numbers only went up.

But like the Japanese have to crank up sales to increase profitability they will have to lower costs to attract people. By lowering quality (control) or materials. As a result the modern Japanese cars aren't as good as they were 10 years ago. Think of the original Toyota Camry that was SO good it was costing dealers money.

Now Hyundai is here with 5 and 10 year warranties. People that weren't convinced will be when the economic climate won't change a lot the coming years. Suddenly those replacement parts after 3-5 years owning a new car are getting expensive. But then a good looking Hyundai or Kia vehicle is sitting there in that showroom. "I will never buy something Asian", "It can't be that reliable", "The warranty has to be fake". But years of positive comments and experiences, like they can read here on these relative unbiased and objective forums (well, almost) ... that will make them rethink a car from Korea.

Market-shares of H&K are already pretty high and there is NO reason why it won't stay that way or even increase the coming few years. My Hyundai SFS is NOT an ugly car. It is not slow. It isn't missing the basic luxury items that people in a good American or German car could brag about. It brings you from A to B and quite well.

But .. after the market-share increases the management will want to crank up profit, not just market-share and then the Koreans might follow the path of the rest of the world ; saving on parts, making the sheet-steel thinner, increasing the price of these 'desired' options (like a panoramic roof or that top-stereo) like the German brands are very known for. So the coming few years is a good time to buy from Korea. After that, after they have secured the maximum obtainable market-share they'll go for profits, like any sane company would do.

A lot of American brands have died. As well in the UK, in Europe and some in Japan. There is a chance there will be less and less brands very soon ; it is no longer viable to have small-scale factories. We already see this with sports-cars ; often they're sold at huge profits, but are there to give the impression to buyers of their middle-class cars that they, the customers, also are driving, almost, a sports-car. A Dodge Viper, a Chevrolet Corvette, A Ford Mustang. But those sales will slowly die out, thanks to higher running costs and perhaps also because you will get MORE from middle-class cars nowadays. Look what our SFS (2.4 and 2.0T) can do. Hardly anyone of us has used that power, whereas I can surely remember to go full throttle with European cars before because they lacked power to go faster. I can remember our Merc 190D, diesel, with 75 horsepower. Seventy-five. The car was around 3000 lbs. It did not move AT ALL. Now the 2.0T is perhaps 4000 lbs, but has 3 (three!) times more power (240hp in my case). And enough torque to deform hot asphalt. Well almost.

Now the Hyundai SFS 2.0T can compete, regarding engine, with a Mercedes GLK 3.0 liter V6. Though the Merc is costing a WHOPPING 60% more. And it's smaller. And you pay Merc prices at the dealer. And you aren't that rich driving a GLK because real guys drive the GL (!). So while having a Merc 190D in the 80's was a real status symbol, driving one now, not so much. Kudos to Hyundai & Kia for accomplishing that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,978 Posts
I want to see the total value of replacement parts being purchased once cars are over 4-5 years old.

Not tires, brakes and batteries; but parts that shouldn't fail like electronic modules and fuel pumps etc.

The dealer and aftermarket numbers would both need to be added up and then do a real world ranking of the vehicles; would be quite interesting.

The data is out there; obtaining it and finding a way for someone to make money selling the info; not that easy.

The bought and payed for "vehicle of the year award", as useless as **** on a bull.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top