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2008 Accent 3 dr 5 sp manual; 2010 Genesis Coupe 2LT track 6 sp manual
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Them look great for that kind of miles.

Me and my son changed his this summer on his Malibu 4 cyd at 100k miles. They looked as good as the new ones we put back in.

Plugs have come a long way from the old days.
 

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just changed my plugs 122000 just put fresh set of NGKs in^_^ View attachment 94993
I've seen plugs come out of cars at 50K that didn't look that great.

Plugs have come a long way from the old days.
You're correct, sir. The first time I heard someone tell me they had bought a car that doesn't need a plug change until 100,000 miles? I thought to myself, "Yeah, good luck with that!" Shows you what I knew. ;) Unbelievable. Technology just keeps finding new ways to amaze me. Every day, it seems.
 

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Those plugs weren't broken in yet. Pop them back in.

I took the OEM plugs outta my Kia Sedona, which were Champion platinum at 129,000 miles, and they just had nubs left. Still ran fine.
 

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My Denso plugs at 84,000 miles and a new NGK iridium plug. I lost three mpg with the new plug install. I'm thinking of reinstalling the old plugs to see if my mileage picks up. If so I will get new Denso plugs. Hwy61



Not all 100,000 miles plugs do so well though. Above are some from a 2006 Ford F150, the kind that break off deep inside the engine head and take a special tool, called a Lisle, to remove them. The gap on the new plug is 0.045" and the gap at 100,000 k is well over 0.090".

Denso recommends their iridium plugs be changed at appx 30,000 miles due to rounding of the edges at the electrodes. From my experience....you don't need to do that. Do not gap or even check iridium plugs with a round feeler gauge, they are thin.... .7mm and very hard and apparently break very easily. Hwy61
 

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I've seen plugs come out of cars at 50K that didn't look that great.

You're correct, sir. The first time I heard someone tell me they had bought a car that doesn't need a plug change until 100,000 miles? I thought to myself, "Yeah, good luck with that!" Shows you what I knew. ;) Unbelievable. Technology just keeps finding new ways to amaze me. Every day, it seems.
Young kids today have no idea how good they have it. I remember constantly trying to keep the timing correct on my cars in the old days(cams and points). I'll take the new sensors and coil systems of today over anything in the old days. Cars just run so much better.
 

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2008 Accent 3 dr 5 sp manual; 2010 Genesis Coupe 2LT track 6 sp manual
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My Denso plugs at 84,000 miles and a new NGK iridium plug. I lost three mpg with the new plug install. I'm thinking of reinstalling the old plugs to see if my mileage picks up. If so I will get new Denso plugs. Hwy61



Not all 100,000 miles plugs do so well though. Above are some from a 2006 Ford F150, the kind that break off deep inside the engine head and take a special tool, called a Lisle, to remove them. The gap on the new plug is 0.045" and the gap at 100,000 k is well over 0.090".

Denso recommends their iridium plugs be changed at appx 30,000 miles due to rounding of the edges at the electrodes. From my experience....you don't need to do that. Do not gap or even check iridium plugs with a round feeler gauge, they are thin.... .7mm and very hard and apparently break very easily. Hwy61

I think Densos are better than the NGK myself but they don't offer the different types like NGK. Did you try and adjust the gap on the new plugs?
 

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No, they appeared to be exactly the same. I do like the double .7mm iridium tips on both electrodes that Denso uses. Back in the day lead in the fuel would really foul plugs and point gap (s) could rapidly change. 10,000 to 12,000 miles and it was time for new plugs. A car was old at 60,000 miles. But....you could climb in the engine bay if you liked and work on everything without having to take the car half apart. M1911
 

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It's probably not a big deal on a natural aspirated motor other than maybe a bad gap from the factory. On turbo motors they should definitely be checked and more than likely the gap should be closed from the factory spec.

But I would always at least check the new plugs before just sticking them in the motor.
 
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