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Just recently took my 2020 sonata in to the dealer for its 1st oil change since I’ve owned the car. It was around 6500 miles, they did oil change and tire rotation. Before the service I could hold the steering wheel level and I would drive perfectly straight. Now if I hold the wheel level while driving I veer to the right, every time no matter that road. Is this something that could have been caused by the rotation? To my knowledge they never were rotated before.
 

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Just recently took my 2020 sonata in to the dealer for its 1st oil change since I’ve owned the car. It was around 6500 miles, they did oil change and tire rotation. Before the service I could hold the steering wheel level and I would drive perfectly straight. Now if I hold the wheel level while driving I veer to the right, every time no matter that road. Is this something that could have been caused by the rotation? To my knowledge they never were rotated before.
Take it back to the dealer, they did something wrong.
 

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Just recently took my 2020 sonata in to the dealer for its 1st oil change since I’ve owned the car. It was around 6500 miles, they did oil change and tire rotation. Before the service I could hold the steering wheel level and I would drive perfectly straight. Now if I hold the wheel level while driving I veer to the right, every time no matter that road. Is this something that could have been caused by the rotation? To my knowledge they never were rotated before.
Hyundai’s are set-up with 1-1.2 degrees of camber and typically 0.2-0.5 degrees of toe in on the rear wheels. The front wheels have 0.5-0.7 degrees camber and 0.0 - 0.2 toe-in. Because of these slightly different settings, the tires wear with different patterns.

The inside of the rear tire wears a little faster. The outside of the front tire wears faster, due to scrub radius. Rotating the tires even the wear patterns and prolong the life of the tires. Rotating the tires with different wear pattern can cause slight pull or wandering when first rotated.

You should
1). Check your tire pressures. Uneven tire pressure can cause pulling to one side and uneven driving experience turning right or left.
2). Does your car wobble while driving down the road? Check the torque on the wheel lugs.
Uneven torque of wheel lugs can cause wobble feeling.
3). On the crown on the freeway, does your car drive straight or wander off the crown into the ditch? Do you have to constantly straighten the car by steering toward the crown of the freeway road? If yes, You might need a 4 wheel alignment. Ask the service mechanic to add 1/16”-1/8” toe in to each front tire with zero offset. The toe-in will self correct and steer your car to the center of the freeway road crown. Toe-out will require too much attention to keep the car straight on road crown, it will drive straight on flat road, but exhausting on freeway crowns, wandering into the ditch. Offset toe will pull right/left depending on the off-set. My car got the suspension knocked out by high-speed pot hole, within 2-3 month after a tire rotation and 4 wheel alignment. Just had to do it again.
4). Look at your tires on your car. If the wheel and tires are bowed out at the bottom, too much (0.25” or 1/4”) measured with a string and a rock tied to the end. Take it back to the dealer for a 4 wheel alignment to De-camber the wheels.

Don’t ask for performance suspension setting. Performance setting have lots of chamber and toe-out. This allow racers to turn-into a corner faster and exit corners faster. But for normal street driving, it can become exhausting and require lots of attention to keep the car straight on freeway crown, with the car wanting to wander into the ditch.

Ask for neutral “Under-steer” set-up for comfort. Middle of the alignment set-up, Less camber F/R and 1/16” to 1/8” toe-in F/R with even setting all four corners, zero offset L/R.
 

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Even tire pressure left and right is very important. 2-4 psi difference from left tire and right tire can cause the car to pull to one side and uneven steering response going left or right.

Let’s review some tire pressure settings:

32-33 psi softer comfortable ride, less road feel, slower turn-in, slower steering response. Typical factory setting for comfort. This wears the outside of my tires Faster.

35-36 psi slightly bumper ride, slightly faster steering response, little better MPG, even wear on my tires.

38-40 psi you will feel every bump, uneven road surface, the car will feel jittery or jumpy and steering response will be faster, slight improvement in MPG. Your tire will wear the middle of the tire faster.

The best method to fill your tires. Get a good tire pressure gage with a bleed valve. Pressurize your tires 3-4 psi over the setting you want, on all four tires. Go back to the 1st tire and check the pressure. Bleed out the air until your desired setting. Perform this on all 4 tires. Fill all four first, then bleed out each tire to the desired pressure. Make certain the Left and Right tires are within 1 psi of each other.

Hope the information helps.

Best Wishes
 

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Hyundai’s are set-up with 1-1.2 degrees of camber and typically 0.2-0.5 degrees of toe in on the rear wheels. The front wheels have 0.5-0.7 degrees camber and 0.0 - 0.2 toe-in. Because of these slightly different settings, the tires wear with different patterns.

The inside of the rear tire wears a little faster. The outside of the front tire wears faster, due to scrub radius. Rotating the tires even the wear patterns and prolong the life of the tires. Rotating the tires with different wear pattern can cause slight pull or wandering when first rotated.

You should
1). Check your tire pressures. Uneven tire pressure can cause pulling to one side and uneven driving experience turning right or left.
2). Does your car wobble while driving down the road? Check the torque on the wheel lugs.
Uneven torque of wheel lugs can cause wobble feeling.
3). On the crown on the freeway, does your car drive straight or wander off the crown into the ditch? Do you have to constantly straighten the car by steering toward the crown of the freeway road? If yes, You might need a 4 wheel alignment. Ask the service mechanic to add 1/16”-1/8” toe in to each front tire with zero offset. The toe-in will self correct and steer your car to the center of the freeway road crown. Toe-out will require too much attention to keep the car straight on road crown, it will drive straight on flat road, but exhausting on freeway crowns, wandering into the ditch. Offset toe will pull right/left depending on the off-set. My car got the suspension knocked out by high-speed pot hole, within 2-3 month after a tire rotation and 4 wheel alignment. Just had to do it again.
4). Look at your tires on your car. If the wheel and tires are bowed out at the bottom, too much (0.25” or 1/4”) measured with a string and a rock tied to the end. Take it back to the dealer for a 4 wheel alignment to De-camber the wheels.

Don’t ask for performance suspension setting. Performance setting have lots of chamber and toe-out. This allow racers to turn-into a corner faster and exit corners faster. But for normal street driving, it can become exhausting and require lots of attention to keep the car straight on freeway crown, with the car wanting to wander into the ditch.

Ask for neutral “Under-steer” set-up for comfort. Middle of the alignment set-up, Less camber F/R and 1/16” to 1/8” toe-in F/R with even setting all four corners, zero offset L/R.
All great info. I never even thought to ask them to try and tune the alignment to this degree. I bet I would be met with blank stares and laughs as the tech wanders back into the service bay. If they can get the numbers to land in the green or yellow zone on an alignment print out, consider that a success. If you are able to find a tech willing to tune to that degree then that is great - and keep going to them!
 

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All great info. I never even thought to ask them to try and tune the alignment to this degree. I bet I would be met with blank stares and laughs as the tech wanders back into the service bay. If they can get the numbers to land in the green or yellow zone on an alignment print out, consider that a success. If you are able to find a tech willing to tune to that degree then that is great - and keep going to them!
Just be nice. There was a lady couple weeks ago, who thought the same. I recommended she be nice and they might perform the service she needed. She said it worked.

Hyundai is trying very hard to improve their overall quality. Ask nicely and they might just do your service request. I think most Hyundai dealers have Easter or Spring specials, this includes 4 wheel alignment.

I had mine done twice in less than 3 weeks and paid only once. They even knew it was a high speed pot-hole because of the bent tie-rod, the second time. They fixed everything the second time without charging me.

Background info. I did have my 3 Hyundais regularly service at my dealer. The cars had 6 yr/60K mile service contract. I currently perform mostly DIY service.
 

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All great info. I never even thought to ask them to try and tune the alignment to this degree. I bet I would be met with blank stares and laughs as the tech wanders back into the service bay. If they can get the numbers to land in the green or yellow zone on an alignment print out, consider that a success. If you are able to find a tech willing to tune to that degree then that is great - and keep going to them!
The Hyundai dealer service have the new laser wheel alignment. Sensor/laser is mounted on the wheel and point the laser 20 ft away. A 1/16 inch toe in show up as inches deviation 20 ft away. So it’s easy for the computer optical sensor to detect. My dealer gave me a print out of each 4 wheel alignment for my record. The new wheel alignment machine is huge, taking up an entire bay and leveled to fractions of an inch. The computer actuate servo motors in the floor to turn the wheels on the car, while the mechanic is in the pit, to get proper alignment.

The reading they gave me were 0.21 degree camber up front and 0.05 degree toe-in for each front wheel with 0.01 degree offset.

The alignment instrument can measure to higher tolerance than mechanics can turn the adjustment nuts. He had it perfect, but when he torque tightened the bolts, it move 0.02 degrees.
 

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Thanks for all the info everyone. I called the dealer and they said to bring it in and they’ll see if it’s out of alignment and we’ll go from there.
Added to that I noticed all tires are 36PSI except driver front, it’s 37, they use to all be 34 before the service, not sure if they would be a factor.
 

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Thanks for all the info everyone. I called the dealer and they said to bring it in and they’ll see if it’s out of alignment and we’ll go from there.
Added to that I noticed all tires are 36PSI except driver front, it’s 37, they use to all be 34 before the service, not sure if they would be a factor.
That could be a factor. You may want to try lowering all four tires to 34 psi and see if that helps before taking it in. Has the ride become any bumpier as well?
 

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tire pressure varies with temp and use. 34 psi will easily become 37 after several miles
Yes they do increase in temperature. I just bleed the tires on 3 cars from 38-39 psi (winter fill 35 psi) down to 33-34 psi spring. More comfort setting, smoother over spring pot-holes.
 

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Just recently took my 2020 sonata in to the dealer for its 1st oil change since I’ve owned the car. It was around 6500 miles, they did oil change and tire rotation. Before the service I could hold the steering wheel level and I would drive perfectly straight. Now if I hold the wheel level while driving I veer to the right, every time no matter that road. Is this something that could have been caused by the rotation? To my knowledge they never were rotated before.
Ya know, I had recently had the tires rotated on my Santa Fe and now I have to hold the steering wheel slightly to the left too keep going straight. I have to wonder if it's how the tires have been wearing that would cause this.
 

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Tire pressure does rise when the tires heat up but you should not bleed pressure off when hot because it is above the cold inflation pressure. Most tires handle and wear better with higher pressures in front and lower in the rear, and generally higher pressures than what the OEM recommended.

It's too low of pressure that usually cause issues.

Good luck. My Gen Coupe has pulled to the right from day one. Hyundai says it's in spec.
 

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Tire pressure does rise when the tires heat up but you should not bleed pressure off when hot because it is above the cold inflation pressure. Most tires handle and wear better with higher pressures in front and lower in the rear, and generally higher pressures than what the OEM recommended.

It's too low of pressure that usually cause issues.

Good luck. My Gen Coupe has pulled to the right from day one. Hyundai says it's in spec.
You should have your alignment set with toe-in and zero offset L/R.

Next time you go in for alignment, ask for 1/16 to 1/8 inch toe-in on each of the front/rear tires, with zero offset L/R. This will cause the tire to steer back to the center road crown and keep the car going straight. This is less exhausting for everyday driving. It will not respond with higher grip at very high speed cornering. And de-camber the wheels to less than 1 degree. This give smooth quiet ride and even tire wear.

Racing set up is straight ahead or slight toe-out with 2 degree camber to compensate for high speed corner loading. This can be very exhausting driving every day, because the car will be jittery and want to wander off the road crown, into the ditch. It will also cause higher tire wear in daily driving. ...but you get higher cornering speed before lose of tire traction.

Best Wishes
 
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