Hyundai Forums banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Anytime I fill up my gas gauge stops around 3/4ths full then slowly climbs up to full. When I say slowly I mean 15--20 miles of driving kinda slow. It doesnt matter If I let it sit all day after I fill up, it will still sit below a full tank until I drive it around. Its been like this since I picked up the car 3 months ago.

Anyone else have this issue? Its annoying and plants doubt in my head about how accurate it might be down the line.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,086 Posts
Sounds like the float is sticking. Take it back to where you purchased it and let them fix it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,704 Posts
Sounds like the float is sticking. Take it back to where you purchased it and let them fix it.
My exact thoughts as well.

Grab your helmet; it’s time for some rally driving to shake that float loose. ~Completely kidding~
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,801 Posts
If it is the fuel sender, at least they don't have to drop the tank, Hyundai has an access plate under the rear seat, this saves a ton of work.

For years, the fuel sender was directly in series with a hot wire gauge that is a slow responding ammeter, other wise that needle would be jumping all over the place. In the Elantra, the fuel sender output voltage is send to a "computer" within the confines of the instrument panel that uses a correction algorithm then applied to the meter. This can also be the problem or within the gauge itself due to a weak electrical connection, taking its time to heat up that wire.

Substituting the resistance of the fuel sender with the same size rheostat at the connector under that access plate, can verify if the gauge electronics is working correctly. Also on new stuff, can find a connector not fully plugged in.

Ha, use to say, never want to buy a car that was assembled on a Friday afternoon or on a Monday morning.

Hope your dealer does not tell you this is normal, it is not normal.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,287 Posts
One reason I use Techron. Had bad sending unit on two vehicles. After regular Techron zero issues.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,801 Posts
Use to use a nichrome wire wound fuel sender with a rather stiff wiper for that rheostat, now a piece of carbon on a ceramic substrate with a rather light wiper, every time you hit a bump that wiper did a lot of wiping. Would get coated with varnish, so any cheap fuel system cleaner that said it removes varnish will get it working again.

And that is all you found in the tank, that sender, now its the fuel pump motor, fuel regulator, and the fuel filter with the sender as part of that assembly. When the regulator was on the engine, needed a third hose for three lines, fuel feed, fuel return, and a tank pressure line for fuel evaporative emissions control, mounting that regulator in the tank eliminated that fuel return line.

Can ethanol be the problem? This is what ethanol did to one of my fuel senders, didn't take photos of others, yes there were others, most I had to drop the tank first. Fuel cleaner did not work on this one.

One good feature of the Elantra, also has miles remaining and on the tip of the fuel sender tube is a thermistor that warns when you have two gallons of fuel left so only solely dependent on the sender.
 

Attachments

·
SENIOR MODERATOR
Joined
·
9,284 Posts
For years, the fuel sender was directly in series with a hot wire gauge that is a slow responding ammeter, other wise that needle would be jumping all over the place.
My mom had a 1993 Toyota Previa 'back in the day' that would take a solid 2-3 minutes to register a full tank. Slowest gas gauge I've ever seen.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,801 Posts
When it 20 below outside with a 25 mph wind, set the pump to low, get in the Limited and hit the start button twice without stepping on the brake. Fuel gauge keeps up with the fill, when at the top line, get out, pump is just about ready to kick off.

This is how it should work.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
My Limited has had the same issue. My first two fill-ups, then another time about 1500 miles later. I am confident it is nit mechanical, but something in the software whch controls the gauge.

I will bring it up when I take my car in for its first free service next month, but really doubt that there is a fix other than a ECU reflash.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,801 Posts
My mom had a 1993 Toyota Previa 'back in the day' that would take a solid 2-3 minutes to register a full tank. Slowest gas gauge I've ever seen.
88 Supra, the gas gauge stays where if was with the key off, just looked at it after four months, sill showing full. Ha, wonder how they are doing this. But sure goes down when driving it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
168 Posts
Can ethanol be the problem? This is what ethanol did to one of my fuel senders, didn't take photos of others, yes there were others, most I had to drop the tank first. Fuel cleaner did not work on this one.
Another good practice is to run a tank of recreational gas [Regular gas (non ethanol )] to clean the fuel sender.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
UPDATE:

Sorry for taking so long to respond but I have a good update. I "reset" the ecu by unhooking the battery for a solid 3 hours. When I hooked it back up the gauge popped right up to full. My next fill the gauge went right to full like it should. Seems to have fixed the issue for now. Ill update again if any changes happen.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,801 Posts
Been using Seafoam for years, first one on the market, also helps to clean the center electrode insulator on the spark plug, misfire can wreck your catalytic converter plus also all that debris under your intake valves restricting air flow. Do this every 4,000 miles, since 1972, never had to replace a catalytic converter.

1972 was the year of the cat.

GM was vehemently opposed to it, an after the fact emission control device until they realized yet another high profit item aided by law. Augmented by the O2 sensor, that maintains the AF ratio at 14.7, first without a heater, but then added one, cheap nichrome, with 1,400*F exhaust blowing on it, only increased its warm up time by a few seconds, but our lovely EPA says a few seconds is better than none, doubled the price of it. Has just to hit 350*F to become effective.

Then wanted us to heat the catalytic converter, was not practical so came out with winter gas with about 28,000 BTU in heating value compared to summer gas. And at even a higher price.

Compared to an ignition distributor even with points in it, lot cheaper to manufacture a distributorless ignition system.that just required a simple notch cut into the crankshaft and camshaft, contains a few wires wrapped around a tiny bar magnet, but yet the prices keep on increasing. mechanical distributors were very expensive.

As a comparative example, in 1965 would cost you $650.00 to purchase a 20" color TV set, today can buy a 32" flatscreen for around $150.00 that is far more reliable, this is how electronics has changed. On since 1965 a dollar is only worth 12.5 cents, so that 1965 TV would cost $5,200.00 today. We are sure getting screwed with automotive and sure don't see stainless steel anymore, all plastic.

One huge expense is liability insurance since we have become a sue happy society.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
845 Posts
My Limited has had the same issue. My first two fill-ups, then another time about 1500 miles later. I am confident it is nit mechanical, but something in the software whch controls the gauge.

I will bring it up when I take my car in for its first free service next month, but really doubt that there is a fix other than a ECU reflash.
I think the opposite, actually. If it were software-related, then most owners who purchased their vehicles during a certain time period would have noticed the problem, and it appears there are very few.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top