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'22 Calli FWD Portofino Gray/black int.
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know there is a distance/time service reminder in the setup menu.

Is there an oil life reading for the Santa Fe?
Or one that has to be reset after servicing?

I couldn't locate in manual.

TIA
 

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It's basically the same thing IMO. It hardly deviates from the pre-set mileage and time frames in my experience, since it's just an algorithm, and not real oil life that a sensor reads, which many owners assume is the case (there's no such thing). And both have to be reset after servicing, but on the SF, you can do that yourself on the infotainment screen, and change either or both of those parameters to your liking (I set them at 5K miles and 1 year).
 

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'22 Calli FWD Portofino Gray/black int.
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
It's basically the same thing IMO. It hardly deviates from the pre-set mileage and time frames in my experience, since it's just an algorithm, and not real oil life that a sensor reads, which many owners assume is the case (there's no such thing). And both have to be reset after servicing, but on the SF, you can do that yourself on the infotainment screen, and change either or both of those parameters to your liking (I set them at 5K miles and 1 year).
Thanks, that was my hunch, but was use to seeing an oil life left reading on past cars.
I will go by miles like I did in the past.
 

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You can get in that setting to see what's left. Oh, and the darn thing starts bothering you way before that every time you start the vehicle. I set it for 1K initially, and at 300 started bothering me. Ha ha. So reset it for 5K. I'm going to extend my 5K by the amount of miles it bothers me before the set amount next time, so I don't have to deal with that. In other words, if it start throwing warnings 700 miles earlier, will set the interval to 5,700 miles, so I don't have to see that warning every time I start the vehicle. But I'll also check to see if I can turn the warning off, but the counter keeps counting; that'd be good. At any rate, I always keep tabs of mileage for oil changes, so I don't need such service reminders.
 

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2015 Sonata Limited 2.4 GDI non turbo 40k miles
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I think such oil quality sensors were mounted on rather more expensive cars, perhaps european german brands ? Maybe american brands as well. The algorithm should help a little though, it's not that useless but of course, if you live in the same area - same weather around the year - and have the same driving pattern, the suggested replacement interval is not going to vary. I would guess such algorithm takes into consideration the duration of trips - several small trips vs fewer long distance ones - the outside temperature at start-up - having the car in a heated garage would not change this, perhaps the acceleration style, and so on. I wonder if it's set to consider whether the owner is using synthetic vs mineral oil ?
 

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There are no oil quality sensors on any car; they simply don't exist. But some vehicles have better algorithms to calculate oil life indeed. If you really want to know the oil quality after 'x' miles, or to push the envelope on intervals, the only way to know is with an oil analysis. But since it basically costs the same as doing an oil change, I just change it myself every 5K miles :).
 
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2015 Sonata Limited 2.4 GDI non turbo 40k miles
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I went searching online and it seems there is actual such technology, it may be used in the truck industry but also in some more expensive sedans.

Source www.autoserviceprofessional.com/articles/4844-can-we-trust-oil-life-monitors

"However, a sensor that could monitor the actual engine oil condition was developed. These oil condition sensors take advantage of the fact that the dielectric properties of engine oil change as it wears out, breaks down or contamination builds up.

These sensors are even capable of detecting the depletion of the oil’s additive package as the oil’s acidity increases and can identify engine coolant or fuel in the oil.

Mercedes-Benz takes advantage of an oil condition sensor in its Flexible Service System (FSS) or ASSYST systems to extend the oil change intervals of these vehicles. BMW also uses a similar sensor to evaluate the actual condition of the engine oil and extend oil services on their models.

The oil condition sensor is allowing extended service of upwards of two years and 15,000 miles if the proper oil is installed."

From a 2008 publication from Mercedes www.autoblog.com/2008/03/12/mercedes-benz-new-oil-sensor-can-keep-you-driving-safely-on-old/

In order to determine the ideal moment for the next servicing, the Daimler researchers therefore use a special sensor that provides clear readings. This sensor, which is integrated into the oil circuit and registers the characteristic parameters, allows the engine oil to be monitored directly.

To evaluate the quality of the oil, its so-called permittivity is calculated by means of an AC potential applied between the interior and exterior pipes of the oil-filled sensor. This parameter is a measure of the extent to which the oil can transmit the applied electric field. If the engine oil is contaminated by water or soot particles, it polarizes to greater extent and its permittivity increases.

However, not all impurities can be registered with sufficient precision via the electric field. The researchers use viscosity as a further quality marker to detect any diesel fuel that may have found its way into the oil. In the laboratory, they use an orifice viscometer – a container with a small opening through which the oil flows out. The time required for this process - the "efflux time" - which is dependent on the oil's flow characteristics, is a direct measure of its viscosity. This in turn gives an indication of the oil's remaining lubricative quality.

The Daimler researchers can also measure viscosity while the vehicle is in motion by observing the oil's side-to-side motion in the sump. The more slowly the oil moves, the higher its viscosity. This movement is registered by the oil sensor and the viscosity calculated on this basis.

One single sensor, and the intelligently processed information which is already available on board the vehicle, are sufficient to determine the various parameters of the engine oil. This onboard oil quality surveillance is currently being prepared for series application in commercial vehicles. The resulting precise calculation of due times for maintenance stops will allow oil change intervals to be extended by about one-fourth.
 

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I remember reading about that, but the sensors were not deemed accurate. How old is that article? At any rate, not even my $100K+ vehicles have had that option, nor would I trust that thing anyway (ha ha). But hopefully those sensors are more accurate today. They make the most sense on big rigs, due to their need to maximize service intervals. At any rate, my statement was wrong, and I stand corrected :). Thank you for posting that.
 

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The “oil life” is a time/distance calculation based on some pre-determined oil change interval. For instance, our Honda has a 6k oil change interval. After an oil change, and driving 3k miles, our oil life is 50%. At 5600 miles, 15% oil life or so, it tosses a little wrench light as a reminder to get it serviced.
 

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On our SF, yes. But some vehicles have a more complex algorithm that takes into account other factors. I'm glad the SF has something, for those who value such features (I don't. Ha ha). But more importantly, it can be reset by the owners, so kudos to Hyundai for that.
 
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