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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've taken my 2012 Touring in multiple times for what's being called a 'hard shift' issue by the dealership. Nothing has been resolved. They have given me the option to reset the adaptive controls but I'm not sure I want to go down that road. I have owned the vehicle since 66 miles (currently right about 22,600) and while my bf drives the car on occasion, I'm the main driver. Miles are mostly city driving (Chicago) with a couple long hauls to the east coast.

The vehicle was recently in again and there was no resolution on the issue. Below is my emailed response to the dealership further explaining the issue... the only response I got in regards to this was:

Thanks for the additional information. The more we know the more it can help.

Regarding what's been determined to be a transmission/'hard shift' issue, you mentioned that it's normal to feel the car shift when I'm "free wheeling" then giving it gas but what I'm experiencing occurs when I'm not engaging the gas pedal at all--which I've said all along. What it feels like isn't a downshift either, it feels like it upshifts and holds for a moment before continuing to decelerate/move to lower rpms--all while giving no gas. This feeling of upshifting while no gas is being given has been routinely happening when the tachometer needle reaches just about 1,000 rpms in conjunction with the cars mph at 22/21, without the gas pedal engaged. I tend to coast as I approach stop signs as opposed to gassing and then having to break harder as I reach the stop sign--It's during this coasting that it's happening. When it does, as the tach needle reaches the 1 mark (and again, only when the mph is 22/21 and decelerating as the car coasts) the feeling of upshifting occurs (as if I had depressed the gas pedal, but again, I'm coasting). When this happens, I've witnessed the tach needle rise slightly then hold. After the upshift feeling and the tach needle's slight rise then hold, the car seems to even out and continue to decelerate during which the tach needle will plummet very quickly for a moment (instead of the steady decline one would expect while coasting) before it too evens out. I've had the pleasure and burden of driving a lot of cars--from some very nice Caddies to some hoopty old Hyundais and I've never felt anything equivalent.

Is an upshift feeling during coasting normal?

Please excuse me if I'm not being clear enough.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Just a little more info...

The info in the above post was from an exchange with the service dept at the dealership last week.

Below is an from an email to the service manager from July 2013 about the same problem.

As you likely know, the cluster repair was completed yesterday. After I got the voicemail from Ed letting me know my car was ready to pick up, I called back to get information regarding an additional issue with my Touring which I asked to have looked at (in addition to a regular maintenance oil change). I've asked about this issue before and looking back, feel as though I had been brushed off. However, over the last few weeks this issue has become increasingly alarming and is a safety concern.

The issue is this: occasionally, since the purchase of my Touring in July of 2012, at low speeds the tachometer AND engine will suddenly rev up. This continues to occur during times when I'm coasting (neither gas nor brake pedal engaged and without any contact with my foot and either pedal). This has happened when it's cold, hot, humid, wet and everything in between that Chicago has offered over the past year since purchasing the car. When this random revving occurs, the car will jolt forward.

This problem has increased with frequency over the past 3 weeks. It occurred 5 times during my commute to/from work during the week prior to bringing it in for the cluster repair. Two days prior to my drop off appointment, the most alarming incident of the problem occurred. I was driving in light city traffic behind a vehicle who's driver was seemingly lost. As we were approaching a stop signal, I took my foot off of the gas and began coasting, as I was at a comfortable following distance behind the lost driver. At the same instance that the driver ahead of me suddenly braked (well before the stop sign) and then abruptly pulled a U-Turn, my engine revved and the car jolted forward before I even had a chance to engage the brake pedal. Erin, I thought my car was going to drive itself into the back of the car in front of me!

So, you could likely imagine how upset I was to hear that noted on the repair record regarding the random revving problem is "could not duplicate". My brother mentioned I should ask about the TPS (throttle position sensor?) or if the vacuum hoses were all checked. Was the problem even checked or am I getting another brush off? I view this problem as a major safety issue and I hope it can be looked into accordingly. If you need any additional information in order to better diagnose the problem, please don't hesitate to ask.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
That is the torque converter unlocking.
Thank you for your help... this issue is really driving me batty.

Is this the way the torque converter is supposed to operate? If this is a symptom of a defective torque converter, would a code be 'thrown'?

*btw, love the dressed up dapper doxie in your profile pic!
 

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Yes it is how they work. If you are keen enough you can feel them lockup when you shift into the last gear. My last car was quite noticeable and you would swear it had two more gears.

If it stops locking up then something is wrong. You can tell if it is not locked by giving it a little gas when cruising down the highway and the rpms go up noticeably without the speed increasing much. If it is locked the rpms are slow to rise but speed increases.
 

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The wifes 07 Accent does this regularly, I find giving the car the occasional 100% full throttle take off, maybe once a month or so, seems to 're-teach' the transmission shift points, including the TCC release which becomes much smoother after. If you are normally a conservative driver only using a small part of the throttle the computers seem to forget how to shift properly, I think it's called 'adaptive learning'
 
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