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2020 Sonata SEL Plus
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Discussion Starter #1
With the announcement of car keys in iOS 14 in today's presentation, does anyone think that iPhone would receive the same digital key feature that Android has? Does anyone who currently uses an android digital key use it over the regular key fob? Curious to see if it'll come to iPhones :)
 

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2020 Sonata Limited
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63 Posts
I have digital key and I set it up but do not use it. I find the standard fob preferable because I don't have to take it out of my pocket to use it. It also works for the auto feature on the trunk where the digital key doesn't work at all.
I think about the digital key as an emergency backup.
 

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I exclusively use Digital Key. I have a smart home and have no reason to carry around physical keys (except my mailbox). I always remote start my car using Blue Link and then get in it by tapping the phone on the door handle which uses NFC (the Digital Key app doesn't need to be open; just the phone unlocked). The car's already running so placing the phone on the charging pad (NFC) invokes all the settings and you're good to go. To start the car (if not pre-started) or open the trunk I use the Bluetooth LE function of the Digital Key app. Moving from traditional keys to Digital Key requires retraining your muscle memory but with smartphones the center of our lives it's a logical evolution.

As to your question about the iPhone. Hyundai's digital key system relies on NFC and/or Bluetooth to perform different functions. For example you can unlock the doors with the app (Bluetooth) or your phone's NFC chip. From what I've read about CarKey it appears to be NFC-only which would limit functionality available to Apple vs. Android users. In my use case I couldn't remote start the car or open the the trunk via the Digital Key app if I was using an Apple product.

In theory there's nothing preventing Apple and Hyundai from replicating the NFC functions that already exist for Hyundai Android users. Basically the car has multiple NFC readers that enable it to perform actions when a properly paired and programmed NFC chip asks it to do something. The BMW/Apple pairing process is very similar to the Hyundai/Android process. The only hiccup would be Apple having some bizzaro NFC broadcast protocol that's different than what Hyundai was anticipating and that they used to design for Android. If that's the case Hyundai would have to update their h/w and/or s/w to conform to Apple's protocol. That probably means next model year.
 
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