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Discussion Starter #1
Does anyone have or know where I can get the electrical diagram for the Hyundai Getz (particularly the charging circuit) and have thoughts about the following problem?


In February the battery light started coming on from time to time. In March I had a new battery put in and in May I had a new alternator put in. Unfortunately, the battery light still comes on from time to time. The light comes on intermittently and the other day the car wouldn't start and I had to call out the NRMA to start the car. It seems that the battery light comes on when it's a hot day but it's hard to know for sure.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Scottie. Thank you, it does help. It looks like there is an I.C. Regulator. Perhaps that is where the problem is.... Would you also happen to have the SD1 to 2 power distribution diagram referred to in the diagram you posted?
 

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It looks like there is an I.C. Regulator. Perhaps that is where the problem is....
Perhaps, but the regulator is built into the alternator so I'd assume your new alternator would have come with a new internal regulator too?

tonyz said:
Would you also happen to have the SD1 to 2 power distribution diagram referred to in the diagram you posted?
I'll have it but what is it your after? SD110-2 coming off the 30A ECU fuse, or SD120-5 coming off the CLUSTER fuse?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
<<< Update on the problem >>>

The auto electrician traced the fault to the instrument panel. He bypassed the alternator/battery warning light and fitted a substitute warning light to the steering column. I don't know how the instrument panel battery warning light could interfere with the operation of the alternator, but evidently it did.

Would anyone know how the battery light in the instrument panel could interfere with the charging functionality of the alternator?
 

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Hi
In order for a charging light to operate correctly the following conditions need to be met.

Correct wattage of bulb fitted.

Equal voltage applied to both sides of charging light.

If there is a high resistance in the circuit then system will not operate correctly. Wires/cables connected to bulb can be easily tested for security and resistance using a multimeter. Bypassing the system may be more cost effective, I would be inclined to address the problem and keep the vehicle in standard condition. I hope this information is of help.
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Hi
If there is a high resistance in the circuit then system will not operate correctly./QUOTE]

I was lucky that the auto electrician would look at my car as such short notice before Christmas. The auto electrician said he had traced the fault to the instrument panel and gave me two options:

a) Fit a new instrument panel, or
b) Bypass the battery light in the instrument panel and fit a new substitute light on the steering column.

I chose option (b) because it meant getting the car back quicker, in fact an hour after he gave me those two options. The auto electrician seemed to prefer option (b) as well.

I know that the original instrument panel light was working in the sense that when the battery light was on the mechanic could see the battery wasn't being charged on his meter. But perhaps there was also a high resistance fault on the battery light part of the instrument panel?

The auto electrician said to me that the fault on the instrument panel battery light would affect the ability of the alternator to charge the battery, but how can that be? Could that be due to high resistance that you mentioned from the battery light on the instrument panel interfering with the alternator such that the alternator doesn't charge the battery when that happens?

The main issue I have with option (b) is that I won't know until the day the new substitute ever comes on whether the new substitute light will do its job. That said I do have my car back which is something.
 

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I know that the original instrument panel light was working in the sense that when the battery light was on the mechanic could see the battery wasn't being charged on his meter.
That kinda suggests the battery light was doing it's job. It's supposed to light up when the alternator isn't charging. That's the whole point of it being there.

tonyz said:
The auto electrician said to me that the fault on the instrument panel battery light would affect the ability of the alternator to charge the battery, but how can that be?
On most cars the battery light is required to get the charging process started. If the light fails (bulb blows) the alternator wont charge. The bulb is used to "excite" the field (basically, sets up a small magnetic field around the rotor inside the alternator).

That's not the case on a Hyundai though. If you look back at the diagram I attached earlier you'll see that there is a "pre-excitation resistor" wired in parallel with the battery warning light. On a Hyundai when the bulb fails the resistor will excite the field instead.

tonyz said:
The main issue I have with option (b) is that I won't know until the day the new substitute ever comes on whether the new substitute light will do its job. That said I do have my car back which is something.
But surely the substitute light illuminates when you initially switch the ignition on, just like the original one did?
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
That's not the case on a Hyundai though. If you look back at the diagram I attached earlier you'll see that there is a "pre-excitation resistor" wired in parallel with the battery warning light. On a Hyundai when the bulb fails the resistor will excite the field instead.
Thanks for the explanation, greatly appreciated. Never would have thought a little bulb could affect an alternator so much, although apparently not on a Hyundai. The old bulb did light up when the alternator wasn't charging. The auto-electrician traced the fault back to the instrument panel, bypassed the existing light and fitted a substitute light. I don't know if he knew about the pre-excitation resistor or not (hopefully he did). Presumably, what you are saying is that while the new light bulb is functional the pre-excitation resistor will not kick in but will when the bulb goes open circuit (blows) the pre-excitation resistor will kick in due to being connected in parallel. At the moment the new light does not turn on when the engine is running, so maybe the bypass has worked but it is a mystery as to why that would fix the charging problem.

But surely the substitute light illuminates when you initially switch the ignition on, just like the original one did?
Actually, yes it does. I hadn't noticed that with the light now being on the steering column behind the steering wheel.
 
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