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I used to use the "CRC" branded stuff on our 2017 Sante Fe, usually every spring. This year; about a month or so after my yearly treatment, I started getting a code for my O2 sensors. Ended up they had to replace my Catalytic Converter, luckily it was under warranty.

I remember a thread about the dangers of using an Intake Valve Cleaner on our GDI engines and how the dissolved crap/carbon from the stems of the intake valves ended up damaging the Converter. I never paid much attention to it, but now that it's happened, I stopped using Intake Valve Cleaner

(just wanted to point out, I am not talking about Injector Cleaner but specifically about Intake Valve Cleaner for GDI Engines)
 

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I've never used anything on mine, gas additive or cleaner...original spark plugs. Still getting around 38-42 for hwy miles.
 

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I’ve never been a proponent for these spray IV cleaners. Several manufacturers strongly advise against doing them. Ford is the most vocal about it.

Three things could happen:

1) carbon debris clogges up the catalytic converter
2) carbon can break off and damage the turbo impeller (turbo charged engines)
3) the spray cleaner can pool up inside the intake manifold. A wide open throttle event can suck up the spray cleaner and get ingested in a cylinder and hydro lock the engine or break valves (common)
 

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I’ve never been a proponent for these spray IV cleaners. Several manufacturers strongly advise against doing them. Ford is the most vocal about it.

Three things could happen:

1) carbon debris clogges up the catalytic converter
2) carbon can break off and damage the turbo impeller (turbo charged engines)
3) the spray cleaner can pool up inside the intake manifold. A wide open throttle event can suck up the spray cleaner and get ingested in a cylinder and hydro lock the engine or break valves (common)
I really dont see where intake valve crud going to hurt performance, the intake is a "dry air" path. Intake valve crud will screw a carb'd engine, as the cheese will soak up the initial load up start up fuel and cause lean until cheese sautrated, then cam port fuel injection. I am still waiting for the home DIY spray can guy to post real "BEFORE" and "AFTER" pics with the intake removed (with spray can flowed through that dry intake

I wanna have some fun with your list -

1) carbon debris clogs up the catalytic converter - Drive hard, hammer down and blow stuff out, though I have seen way more cat killed from oil ingestion (2-stroke ash) and misfire clog cat

2) carbon can break off and damage the turbo impeller (turbo charged engines)- - Not seen that either, damaged turbo, lets talk about original OU plugs busting porcelin and leaving cylinder, then plays proverbial jet engine bird strike and either bends the fan on hot side and stick it into bore to where it now exhaust restriction, sounds nice when pipe drop for test drive, very hard HISS trying to pass turbine blade gaps. How about folks who dont change oil, coke the feed tube solid, and shaft breaks in middle, hot side fan bounce around inside had fella do his own turbo because he didnt like my price, he bought amazon, ran few minute, no more boost, bring it to me like I diag it wrong, wanted Hyundai part warranty on his amazon purchase - fella used old oil tube, clogged solid, paid me to make it run again

3) the spray cleaner can pool up inside the intake manifold. A wide open throttle event can suck up the spray cleaner and get ingested in a cylinder and hydro lock the engine or break valves (common) - I kinda take offense to that, have you ever seen how much oil condensates in bottom of intake, aerosol not going to happen. Crack throttle up to 2500 and the velocity past the cracked blade to bore is just going to destroy that fog and evaporate with the internal intake manifold temperature How much did we pay for that can of whizz ?

Hydrolock, you going to need to garden hose that stuff in, better chance driving in high water, after that, bent valves be side effect of broken rod mashing deck at right time
 

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I really dont see where intake valve crud going to hurt performance, the intake is a "dry air" path. Intake valve crud will screw a carb'd engine, as the cheese will soak up the initial load up start up fuel and cause lean until cheese sautrated, then cam port fuel injection. I am still waiting for the home DIY spray can guy to post real "BEFORE" and "AFTER" pics with the intake removed (with spray can flowed through that dry intake

I wanna have some fun with your list -

1) carbon debris clogs up the catalytic converter - Drive hard, hammer down and blow stuff out, though I have seen way more cat killed from oil ingestion (2-stroke ash) and misfire clog cat

2) carbon can break off and damage the turbo impeller (turbo charged engines)- - Not seen that either, damaged turbo, lets talk about original OU plugs busting porcelin and leaving cylinder, then plays proverbial jet engine bird strike and either bends the fan on hot side and stick it into bore to where it now exhaust restriction, sounds nice when pipe drop for test drive, very hard HISS trying to pass turbine blade gaps. How about folks who dont change oil, coke the feed tube solid, and shaft breaks in middle, hot side fan bounce around inside had fella do his own turbo because he didnt like my price, he bought amazon, ran few minute, no more boost, bring it to me like I diag it wrong, wanted Hyundai part warranty on his amazon purchase - fella used old oil tube, clogged solid, paid me to make it run again

3) the spray cleaner can pool up inside the intake manifold. A wide open throttle event can suck up the spray cleaner and get ingested in a cylinder and hydro lock the engine or break valves (common) - I kinda take offense to that, have you ever seen how much oil condensates in bottom of intake, aerosol not going to happen. Crack throttle up to 2500 and the velocity past the cracked blade to bore is just going to destroy that fog and evaporate with the internal intake manifold temperature How much did we pay for that can of whizz ?

Hydrolock, you going to need to garden hose that stuff in, better chance driving in high water, after that, bent valves be side effect of broken rod mashing deck at right time

You can doubt me all you want it doesn’t bother me. Everything I stated have been documented abnormalities after using spray IV cleaners. Not many auto manufacturers endorse using spray IV cleaners for these very reasons. Again, Ford has been very upfront about not using these spray cleaners.
 

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Here's someone else not so happy with the results:

Myself, I'll wait for some sign of trouble, then I'll take the manifold off and clean manually.
Back from after start of production of the "EL" Tercel with it 3E 1.5L sidedraft style downdraft motorcylce carb coking intakes something fierce about 1987, we were actually issued a walnut blast kit. what a mess, intake off, adapters, walnut still got everywhere, them things was still on the road 10yr later, then they put EFI on the 5E
 

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2015 Sonata Limited 2.4 GDI non turbo 40k miles
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The 2015-onwards models are supposed not having the carbon build up any longer. Hyundai modified the ECU to pump a ton of gasoline at cold starts, to coat the combustion chamber and valves with unburnt gasoline, to prevent/remove carbon build up. This should prevent carbon on most cars. Perhaps the cars that are used for very long drives every day - like several hours driving every day like a taxi, delivery or sales representative, may still develop the carbon problem at higher miles.
 

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The 2015-onwards models are supposed not having the carbon build up any longer. Hyundai modified the ECU to pump a ton of gasoline at cold starts, to coat the combustion chamber and valves with unburnt gasoline, to prevent/remove carbon build up. This should prevent carbon on most cars. Perhaps the cars that are used for very long drives every day - like several hours driving every day like a taxi, delivery or sales representative, may still develop the carbon problem at higher miles.
If this is true, then that would be good news. I have no idea but, I’d like to think Hyundai did something to help alleviate the carbon buildup issue.
 

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I used to use the "CRC" branded stuff on our 2017 Sante Fe, usually every spring. This year; about a month or so after my yearly treatment, I started getting a code for my O2 sensors. Ended up they had to replace my Catalytic Converter, luckily it was under warranty.

I remember a thread about the dangers of using an Intake Valve Cleaner on our GDI engines and how the dissolved crap/carbon from the stems of the intake valves ended up damaging the Converter. I never paid much attention to it, but now that it's happened, I stopped using Intake Valve Cleaner

(just wanted to point out, I am not talking about Injector Cleaner but specifically about Intake Valve Cleaner for GDI Engines)
Don't always believe everything you read on internet threads. CRC removes so little per application. There are no chunks or globs of carbon being passed to the converter by a CRC spray can.

If your dealership stated that solid carbon blocked your converter, please share that written documentation with us. Otherwise, provide us with information on the source of that thread and if possible, please post the thread and attached posts.

When used accordingly, CRC wil maintain carbon buildup caused by accrued mileage prior to first use of CRC. One can every 12k does not remove all the buildup. All it does it keeps the buildup at lower levels, so development does not worsen.

No chunks - no globs - no solid-state removal occurs. It dissolves recent carbon buildup from the top of the deposit area during the prior 12k driven. This is a product that's to be used right from 12k of early engine life, not after 50-70-90k of buildup. Then use the CRC annually every 12k or-so, so the carbon buildup does not worsen year-to-year.

So little gets removed by CRC after 50-70-90k mileage. When that much mileage occurs, have the manifold removed and request the recommended cleaning performed by trusted mechanics. They clean the area manually and thoroughly. Carbon buildup is gone after one of these treatments. Not so using a can of CRC GDI Spray annually 12k.
 
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