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Discussion Starter #1
This is just a pre-post on my diy on how to install heated/electric seats into an Elantra GLS. All I wanted was leather seats and managed to buy the full set of seats off of a 2013 elantra limited for around 300 bucks. The problem is that the front driver seat is powered, so I couldn't install it until I figured out how to wire it correctly. I installed all the other seats, but the rear seats took some work.

The first hurdle was the rear seat and how it attaches to the car. In my GLS, the rear seats are held in by the hinge at the base/middle of the folding seat while the outer sides of the folding seat fits into a post that is screwed into the frame of the car. Removing the seats was easy.

Unfortunately, the seats from the limited has fixed hinges on both sides of the seat and in the middle. Luckily the hinges on the sides bolts the same way as the pole on the ends, but you have to get creative and cut the trim a bit to have it fit. You have to pry the side trim to remove the existing pole/mount, and then adding in the new hinge. I cut a small slit to slide the new bracket through the hole and then bolt it in with the trim moved from the frame. Removing the trim won't make it easier since the hinge blocks the trim. I can take pictures later to show the issues.

Ok once you do this, you can get the rear seats in. The passenger seat bolts in just fine and that seat is manual, so no wiring needed if all you want is leather. The driver seat is powered in the 2013 (it is manual on a 2012, so if you don't want powered seat, go with a 2012) so i had to figure out how to wire it.

The saving grace is that the front seats has the floor harness connectors on the seat, so all i have to do is solder wires onto it to connect it to the rest of the car. If you don't have those, then it'll be very difficult to wire in the front seats unless you make your own connectors. The connectors under the seat lead to more wires, so it'll be easy to replace them with your own connectors.

The internal fuse box has an outlet in pin 1 of I/P-B for the power driver seat and the easy thing is that it takes a .187 quick connect. its pretty hard to find this female quick connect at a hardware store, but you can easily find it online. I used to get it from a local supplier through work but they usually sell in boxes of 100, so get it online. You only need one of this. You can ground it anywhere under the dash.

Ok the next electrical issue is heated seats. If you don't care about heated seats, then you can stop reading.

What you'll need is to subscribe to hyundaitechinfo dot com. You'll need electrical diagrams and connector diagrams. I'll try to save as much as I can, but i'm sure i'll forget one or two views you need.

So there are outlets for heated seats inside the car, but none of the wiring is present. I checked most of the harnesses and they don't have any pins for the front or rear heated seats, so you need to put them in. Most of the terminals are made by KET so you'll need 090 connectors or 025 connectors. They're kinda hard to find and took me a while to find something similar in Mouser. I did find the 090 connectors (almost identical) but the 025 connector is a little different but it should work. I'll post my part numbers in a longer diy thread.

So the outlet for the front heated seats is in pin 42 of EM11 under the lower trim panel behind the hood release handle. I haven't found a 20A add-a-circuit so this is the easiest way to tap into the power. The 090 connector should work. You'll need to split this cable for both front seats. Again, ground it anywhere under the dash.

The climate control holds the heated seat switches. If you don't see that button, your climate control doesn't have the circuitry and you'll need to buy the climate control with heated seats. Mines was about $30 so it wasn't bad.

The connector in the back will be missing exactly 6 pins (it was in my GLS) and those 6 wires are switch, hi and low indicators for each side. These use the 025 connectors.

The front seat will also require a connection to module 3 via pin 36 I/P-B. The schematics makes it very clear.

The rear heated seats is a bit more complicated. First, check to see if your upper seat backs is electrically connected to the bottom seat cushion. Mines was clipped since it may be hard wired out of the factory. The bottom seat cushion will have three wires. The heated seat switches for the rear is in the door panel, so you'll need to buy a new door switch/heated seat panel:
WINDOW SWITCH Elantra; Sedan; Left; w/Heated Seats; All
935803X000RY
WINDOW SWITCH Elantra; Sedan; Right; w/Heated Seats; All
935803X020RY

This will get fairly complicated as you'll need to add both the male and female 090ii pins in the connectors to the door. You will need to run the power through the door harnesses and onto the new switch. You will need to buy a new terminal block to plug into the new heated seat switch as well. Mechanically, you'll need to remove the door trim panel, remove the window switch and replace it with the new assemblies above. The switches were about $30-40. You will also need to tap into the illuminations circuit so that the button lights up when your headlights are on. Its pretty simple when you have the wiring schematic.

There may be an outside chance you can find this heated rear door wiring harness online. It'll probably be around $50 each if you can find it, but it'll save you some trouble getting the connectors, wires, and terminals. It should be plug and play since this section is completely separate from the floor harness. You will still need to run the wires inside the car, but it'll save you probably two hours worth of work.

The power for the rear seats comes from pin 28 and 15 from I/P-B and you'll utilize the fuse in the internal fuse box. It doesn't need a memory wire since the switches are push-button and stay on, but it is triggered by ignition. The front heated seat power wire is always hot (plugged into battery) but is turned on by the memory wire via module 3.

In terms of wire routing, the passenger side routes under the gear shift in the diagrams so you'll have to take apart your center console as well. I may decide to route it under the dash so I can test it before hiding all the wires.

With the way I'm doing it, it'll be very close to OEM and utilize all the OEM fuse holders. I'll try to post all the mouser part numbers once I get it all working so you can order it yourself to get it all working.

If you are buying aftermarket heated seat pads, these instructions won't work for you since the front seats have specific heated seat modules under the seat, and the rear seats have a self-regulating thermostat.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
For the heated seat switch in the door, the easiest thing to do is the buy the wire repair kit, which includes the connector, terminals and some wires out of the connector:

88901-08223-AS
KET-090II-08F

You will need two of these, one for each door. Its $10 from Hyundai oem part vendors so its not a bad cost. You can remove three of the pins from each connector to use them elsewhere since they are 090 terminals. Again, you will need to connect it to the door harness connector but at least its one less connector to worry about.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
So my order was cancelled on the above part number from one of the online Hyundai parts dealers and my local Hyundai dealer couldn't find it either, but there is an alternative that is more expensive:

Kia Part No.: 1890108223AS
KET-090II-08F
I ordered this through my local Hyundai dealership for $15 each but they were unsure about available quantity.

Alternatively, you can get the door wiring harness with the seat warmer connector off ebay if you can find it. I wasn't able to find it though:
916503X011
916603X011

The other door harness without the seat warmers ends in 3X021 and this one without the seat warmer is much easier to find on ebay.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
So success with the front heated seat installs. Both of them fired up and works well. In Boston there was a cold day so I had an opportunity to really try it out.

Follow the wiring diagrams to get the right pin outs for the climate control switches and all the connections to power. The two issues is that the 187 connector for the power seat almost requires the correct special pin to make a good connection. I bought some generic 0.187" quick connects that work ok, but they were a giant pain to push in with the connector already in place. It took me about an hour just to push it in properly. I finally found the connector on Nexus Electronics, so I'll do a swap once I get it.

The other issue is that the power out of EM11 for front heated seat power and the heated seat output out of module 3 (they call it memory power, but it is power activated by ignition) needs to be split between the two seats, so it requires either soldering or crimp connections.

I decided to solder most of the connections, so I had the soldering iron in the car and soldered all the connections. I had the old connector with my used climate control module so I soldered wires into the existing pins and moved it over to my climate control. I then ran the wires out to each of the seats and then soldered them to the existing wire connector in each of the seats. I used some alligator clips to test the signal wires

For the driver seat, the wire routing is pretty simple. Just run it along the bottom trim by the door from the fuse box. The wires into the climate control can be routed down from the radio wire harness down into the footwell. For the passenger seat, I routed the climate control wires directly towards the footrest of the passenger side, then up and behind the fans. I then routed the wires by the bottom trim on the passenger.

The ground connection is inside the door pillar trim, which requires you to remove both of the bottom front and rear trim before you can remove the center pillar lower trim. This is the easiest way to ground the power seat and heated seat on both sides.

For power of the passenger seat, there is a clear path right behind the base of the console. You may need a wire snake to help you push the wire through the hole. When you are routing wires, make sure to route the power for the rear seats as well. It will only be one wire and each wire goes to a different pin in I/P-B so it should be pretty easy. The wires for the rear seats route into the door via the pillar trim so when you remove the trim, route the power into the door. You will also need to route two wires to the rear seats.

The female 090ii pin from mouser is:
571-368287-1-CT

It isn't exactly the same but it fits and locks into place.

The male 090ii pin you need for the door is:
538-35420-9702
Before you put in the pins, make sure to undo the plastic retainer clip in the middle.

I also bought the 040 pins as well and they look identical to the ones from the car, but I didn't need it as my climate control came with the connector and pins cut out of another car, so I ended up using those pins and soldering wires to it.
571-2035334-2
This is the pin that goes into the climate control connector.

What I discovered is that the rear seats only has two wires out of the seat heaters, yellow and black (the diagram has two other colors for the right side). I believe the black is the low side of the heater and the yellow is the hot side. Internally, they ground the black wire before the connector. From the door, two wires (hot and low indicator) goes to the rear seat connector. The third will go to ground behind the seat backs. Also, only the cushion is heated and not the seat backs, even though all the diagrams mention a back heater.

I'll be receiving the connector for the rear heated seat next week so i'll verify it fits before posting more part numbers, but so far everything seems to be fitting in wheel.

So while the seats were fairly cheap by themselves, I had to buy almost $200 in other parts, with the rear door switches at around $30 a piece, the front climate control (from junkyard) at $30, connectors at around $40 for everything, and then another $60 in wires. The most useful was the 25 feet of 10 colors of 18 gauge wires. I used 14 gauge for the power seat, and 16 gauge for power for the heated seats. The rear heated seats look like 16 gauge wires but all I had left were 18 gauge wires. The wires for the climate control were 22 gauge since they are just signal wires.

I also believe the wires in the car is just nylon wires. I bought high temp TXL wire, which had too thick of an insulation relative to the wire gauge so I had some minor issues with the terminals not going into the connectors.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
The first picture is of the connectors. This is the driver's seat and you can see the white connector for the power seat and heated seats. For just heated seats, there is a similar white connector which is much smaller. The passenger seat will have a fourth connector for the passenger occupancy sensor. (I believe it is white but only a few pins)

The next three pictures are of the door connector from the floor harness to the door harness. It is accessed from the center pillar trim. The male connector is in the door and held in by just plastic tabs top and bottom. I did not have to take it out in order to put pins in there. I just popped out the center plastic locking tab and pushed in the pins. I did take out the female connector that goes to the door just to look at the male connector from the other side. You just need to take out the rubber grommet and then unclip the connector.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
More pictures:

The first picture is of the hole behind the center console to run the wires to the passenger side. You can see that I looped the wire above the support and you can't see it unless you put your head under the glove box.

The second picture is of the missing trim on the passenger side. I worked the wires up behind the vents and then down near the connectors on the right side. The side trim will cover it nicely.

The third picture is of my passenger side with the trim ripped out. I staged the soldering iron there since I had to solder the connections into each of the seat harnesses after I ran the wires under the seat.

The fourth picture is of all the trim removed under the steering wheel. You can probably get away with not removing it, but it is very difficult and you'll be in there adding a few wires so best to take a few minutes and remove it.
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Ok I did the rear seat install this weekend and it went pretty well.
I put in the seats and then removed part of the rear seat trim to run the wires. I don't think you need to since it is very difficult to access GF-03 in the rear frame. You need to remove the top rear trim by the rear windshield and it may require you to remove the rear pillar side trim as well. I ran the wires into the center pillar last week and you can see a few pictures two posts above. You need to tap into pin 1, 15 and 18 in that center pillar connector. You will need both male and female pins so that you can make the connection.

Sorry the pictures are out of order due to the upload. The first order of business was to remove the rear door trim to install the rear switch. This part was pretty simple. There are various videos online on how to do this. Just two screws and the whole thing pops off. You can buy the entire rear switch assembly with trim for $40 so not a bad price (both window and heated seat). It was kinda difficult to remove the switch assembly. You can see that I had to take off the grey trim covering the switch since there are two screws holding onto the switch from the outside. There is a mixture of screws and melted plastic tabs holding onto this trim. I drilled out the melted plastic tabs and then removed the screws. I used a smaller drill bit (1/2") so that there was still some of the tab left to help locate the trim once the screws are in place. Once you drill the hole through the plastic tabs, use a screw driver to pop off the rest of the plastic tab. It should pop off as a tiny ring. You'll be left with the shaft so that it'll help locate the trim once its back on.

There is a weird tab holding the grey trim to the switch. Removal is fairly easy (note that there is two plastic "hooks" on the grey trim that you will need to lift off of the door trim), but putting it back on may be difficult due to this weird tab. You'll see once you put it back on.

Once you get the grey trim off, remove the switch and swap it out. This part was easy. Then putting it all back together. Do this for both doors.

Now, I already have power going into the center pillar so all I had to do was access it from the outside. I had to do all the wiring with the door harness in place since I didn't want to remove the black panel in the door. The rubber wire tunnel from the pillar to the door is one piece, so run the wires right through it. You'll need three wires, power, and the two wires from the heated seat. You will need to move this wire harness since the rubber grommet going into the door at the bottom is taped onto the wires to ensure water doesn't come into the door. This means you need to move the wire harness. The harness is attached to the black panel with a grommet near the bottom of the panel. Remove the bottom 5 or 6 bolts and you can find this grommet. It pops up from the bottom, so pry it open a little and you'll see it. You need to be lying on the ground to see this grommet. It only takes 30 seconds and makes your life so much easier if you can move the wire around.

Once you get it loose, push the rubber tunnel into the door so you have a bit more wire in the door. Pull out the bottom grommet and remove the tape, run the wire through the grommet and then re-tape it. The last picture shows the wire through the rubber tunnel into the door and the other pictures show how I ran the rest of the wires.

Now that you have the three wires, wire it up to the connector. I had to buy this connector from China. This was the only source of it.
https://www.aliexpress.com/snapshot...&orderId=91098002837421&productId=32810827839

It also comes with the matching pin. It does the job, but it is not as good as the original connector. I think the terminal is equivalent but fit-finish isn't as nice as oem unfortunately.

Now there are two wires missing, ground and illumination (when you have your headlights on). I tapped into this from the power window switch. It is the blue and black wire. I had to strip and solder the wires in place. Stripping the wire took a few minutes with a box cutter, but soldering took 10 seconds, and another minute to tape it all up. I then tapped the entire power window harness like the original.

I left extra length for the heated seat switch since it is accessed from a different side and with the power window wire already very short, I didn't want to take any chances. You can see the rest of the pictures to see what I have done.

I tested the switch with just three wires (power, low and hi from heated seat) and while the seat warms up, there are no lights. You will need to install the ground and illumination wires to get the button to light up (amber) and the illumations to work.

This all took me about 6 hours but if you don't try to remove the black panel, you can have it done in about 4 hours start to finish, assuming you had the wires in the center pillar already.

Put everything back together and make sure to put back in the waterproof grommets and wire tunnel into the door and center pillar.

Now everything works, just in time for summer. Again, you really don't want to do this outside in the cold since I was outside and/or with the doors open most of the time.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Maybe someone will find this useful, but the upper portion of the back seat is different in US made cars and Korean made elantras.

The US made ones are bare bones, cloth seats. They have a pin that goes into a hole that is created by a piece of sheet metal.
The korean ones are either cloth seats, or heated leather seats. They both have a hinge on either side. This does make it easier to remove the rear upper seat backs since you can remove a 10mm bolt and just pop the seats out. The US made ones are slightly harder in that you have to remove the 10mm bolts, then pop them out of the hole on the side.
Note that the heated rear seats only come in leather, so you would need to replace both the upper and lower rear seats. You could also order the rear seat heating modules (one for each side) and then putting them in yourself and keep your cloth rear seats.

I've shown in the previous posts that if you have the mounting mechanisms, you can fit the korean rear seats into an american made elantra without replacing the side trim. I'm not sure how much the side trims cost, but you can replace that as well.

The bottom seat cushion seem to be the same in both US and Korean made.
The mounts for the front seats are the same for both US and Korean so you can swap them easily.

In terms of electronics, the front seats come in various flavors:
Manual seats, no heat
Manual seats, heated
Power seats, heated

The connector in the manual seat is different from the power seat. As an example, a 2013 elantra with tech package (manual heated) can be put into a 2012 limited (manual heated, but leather) since they both have the same connector. The 2013 limited came with power front drivers seat, but manual passenger seat. I've seen powered passenger seat as well, not sure which year they started that.
 
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