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Connected to the return pipe on the return side of the pump, a vaccuum pump will pull the fuel
all the way from the tank, through the filter and the high pressure pump to the return pipe and will therefore also
pull all the air out of the system at the same time.
Yeah, that is the technique I use myself, although I've never had much luck with my little mityvac hand pump. I use an oil extraction pump which has a good bit more pull than the mityvac.
 

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Discussion Starter #22 (Edited)
I tried removing the return pipe and using the pump on the motor to remove as much air as possible (I pumped untill I stopped seeing any air bubbles) but it still will not run. I have orderered one of those hand pumps and it should be here tomorrow so I can try what you suggested.
 

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Discussion Starter #23
out of interest, would the timing effect the fuel pressure if it was incorrect? (i.e if the crank was 180 degrees out)
 

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Discussion Starter #24
Hello,

not so long ago, I had a Ford Mondeo diesel which has no lift pump at all and is therefore very difficult to bleed.
I bought myself a vaccuum pump for really very little money and it was a really worthwhile investment.

Connected to the return pipe on the return side of the pump, a vaccuum pump will pull the fuel
all the way from the tank, through the filter and the high pressure pump to the return pipe and will therefore also
pull all the air out of the system at the same time.

Clear plastic pipes let you see when there is no more air and then the car would start.
If you cannot get bubble free fuel flowing through the pipe, then there could be a leak somewhere that needs investigating.

The same pump can be used in one person brake bleeding and also to remove excess oil from an overfilled engine
using the dipstick tube.
I have done both of these, having replaced the front to rear and cross axle Terracan brake pipes and also slightly
overfilled the engine at oil change time.
So much easier than accessing the sump plug and trying to let just a bit out without getting covered in oil.

I bought this one and at that price it could be seen as almost disposable.
It has become one of the most useful tools that I have.

If it still won't start, I would assume that cracking the injector feed pipes would remove the rest of the air once
the pump is fully primed but I would think that in the absence of other faults, it will start, just like the Mondeo in the video.
At the risk of sounding stupid... I'm not 100% where I'm suppose to connect the vacuum pump to? (I have it connected the the fuel pump at the back - which I presumed was a return feed?)
 

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I think that's the right place.
If you have bubble free fuel there, the system is primed.
If it still won't start, priming is not the problem.
You might however still need to crack an injector pipe or two to get rid of air in the common rail.
At least, that's what I would try if all else fails.
 

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Discussion Starter #27
I have tried using a scan tool that I own but I dont think its very efficent, so I am going to pay a mechanic to do it (if I can find one who is willing). I managed to bleed the system like ncooper90 suggested however, I've noticed that when I use the primer on the Terracan it seems to introduce a wave of air bubbles into the system (every squeeze does so) - is this normal?
I want to thank everyone here for your help but I am coming to the end of being able to fix my issue. My next step is to phone around tomorrow and see if I can source some help; I'll let you know if I make any progress to help others in my situation.
 

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Discussion Starter #29
Hello,
if that is the case, then I would suspect a leak between the primer and the tank, assuming that the tank is not empty?
I'll check to see how much fuel is in the tank tomorrow; I hope it isn't the case that I have just not got enough fuel in though, as I am going to look very stupid... (as oppose to just my normal stupid)
 

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Discussion Starter #30
Sorry for the very late reply as I've been really busy. Since my last post I've made sure there is enough fuel, changed the crank sensor (as the rev counter reads very low rpm when trying to start) and I had a mechanic out (who didn't seem that interested) who thought that the fuel pump itself may be the issue.
The only option I have to me now is to purchase a recon fuel pump and try that as my local mechanics arn't interested in looking. Failing that, I may just have to give up on it as I've put alot of money into it already and it's all wasted if I can't get it to run.
Anyway... I just thought I would give you an update.
 

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Discussion Starter #32
Thank you for the repy
Hello again, what about the timing, could that be out?
Timing is as it should be (piston one at the top while 3 is at the bottom, for tdc) I think. I've replaced the fuel pump but unfortuneatly, it still won't start. I did notice that the reading whent from doing nothing on the fuel pressure sensor whilst cranking to reading 0.88v after the fuel pump change - so that's something I guess.
Is it possible the injectors could be causing low fuel pressure?
 

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Timing is as it should be (piston one at the top while 3 is at the bottom, for tdc)
There would be something very wrong with the engine if the cyl 3 piston wasn't at the bottom when cyl 1's was at the top.
But what does the piston positions have to do with the cam timing?

Gazel said:
Is it possible the injectors could be causing low fuel pressure?
Yes.
 

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Discussion Starter #34
Sorry... I Didn't realize ncooper meant cam timing. The cams are aligned with each other as the crank is aligned to it's own mark. How could the cam timing be out exactly?
 

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Sorry... I Didn't realize ncooper meant cam timing.
That's what the timing of an engine is. It's the synchronisation of the crank and cam shafts. The position of the pistons relative to one another isn't really relevant because they're relationship is fixed and can't be changed.

Gazel2 said:
How could the cam timing be out exactly?
The cam timing could be out if the cams and crank (and the high pressure pump on your engine) weren't properly aligned before the timing belt was installed. I think ncooper was politely asking if you were sure that you had aligned everything properly when you reinstalled the timing belt when you put the cylinder head back on.
 
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