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Discussion Starter #1
I ended up at the Hyundai dealership today. I had to bring in my 2016 PHEV for a "check engine" light.

I went into the showroom and saw (for the first time) the brochure for the 2018 Sonata Plug-in Hybrid. I picked up a copy and then went to a salesperson to see if they were actually in stock. He checked and said that his system showed that they are actually in the "Pipeline" now. This dealership (Concord, California) has not yet received one but according to his system they have 9 on the way.

According to the brochure, the Limited PHEV will have the following:

(I am listing only features that were not included on the 2016 PHEV Limited)

Automatic Emergency Braking with Pedestrian Detection
High Beam Assist
Driver Attention Alert
LED headlights with Dynamic Bending Light
Heated Steering Wheel (2016 PHEV has but I think discontinued on 2017)
Sirius/XM Travel Link (free trial)
Qi wireless device charging pad

I am not sure what is meant by "Driver Attention Alert". I also am not familiar with the Sirius/XM Travel Link (in how is it different from regular Sirius/XM?).

The brochure also includes information on the 2018 Sonata Hybrid. I noticed that the Hybrid is listed as having 193 horse power compared to 202 horse power for the PHEV.

MPG for the Hybrid SE is listed at 40/46/42. MPG for the Hybrid limited is 39/44/41. For the Sonata PHEV, the only figure given is 39 MPG combined.

In any case, I am glad to hear that the 2018 Sonata PHEV is finally on the way!
 

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Yea, and in some cases the PHEV is probably going to end up being cheaper than the regular hybrid if you qualify for the tax incentives. It should be around $4500 back from Federal, and $1500 from CA state for example. Then there may be local utility savings. For example my local utility will give me a $1000 power credit for each EV (up to 2). And they will cover the cost of an electrician to install a Level 2 charger (up to $500).
 

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Travel link is an information component that Sirius offers on top of radio. You can check weather, fuel prices, movie times and live traffic data. It's... Am alternative for people who don't use carplay or Android auto. Driver attention alert is an audible and usually also haptic feedback that is meant to remind you to watch the road. Usually, if you're getting tired or are distracted, these systems will first beep, and then vibrate the steering wheel or seat to get your attention and get you back to watching the road. They tend to rely on an infrared sensor located on the steering column or in the odometer cluster that watches for continuous eye movement and direction of sight. Also, you are correct when you say they removed the heated steering wheel on the 2017 model. I'm just glad they brought back the pano sunroof for the hybrid and phev models

Sent from my Pixel 2 XL using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Travel link is an information component that Sirius offers on top of radio. You can check weather, fuel prices, movie times and live traffic data. It's... Am alternative for people who don't use carplay or Android auto. Driver attention alert is an audible and usually also haptic feedback that is meant to remind you to watch the road. Usually, if you're getting tired or are distracted, these systems will first beep, and then vibrate the steering wheel or seat to get your attention and get you back to watching the road. They tend to rely on an infrared sensor located on the steering column or in the odometer cluster that watches for continuous eye movement and direction of sight. Also, you are correct when you say they removed the heated steering wheel on the 2017 model. I'm just glad they brought back the pano sunroof for the hybrid and phev models

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Thank you for the information regarding those two features. I am pleased that they are continuing to add features. I am especially pleased about Automatic braking.

Regarding the pano sunroof, according to the brochure I picked up today, today, you get "power tilt and slide panoramic sunroom" on the Hybrid Limited. There is no notation that it is included at all for the PHEV.

It is kind of funny as I ran into a friend that I hadn't seen for a couple of years. He told me that he had purchased a 2016 Sonata Hybrid. He said that he wanted to get the PHEV like mind, but didn't because of the lack of the sunroof.
 

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Automatic Emergency Braking with Pedestrian Detection
High Beam Assist
Driver Attention Alert
LED headlights with Dynamic Bending Light
Heated Steering Wheel (2016 PHEV has but I think discontinued on 2017)
Sirius/XM Travel Link (free trial)
Qi wireless device charging pad
The following existed on 2016 PHEV:
High Beam Assist
Heated Steering Wheel (2016 PHEV has but I think discontinued on 2017)
Sirius/XM Travel Link (free trial)

The brochure also includes information on the 2018 Sonata Hybrid. I noticed that the Hybrid is listed as having 193 horse power compared to 202 horse power for the PHEV.
I think this is exactly the same as 2016 numbers.
MPG for the Hybrid SE is listed at 40/46/42. MPG for the Hybrid limited is 39/44/41. For the Sonata PHEV, the only figure given is 39 MPG combined.
I think this is also exactly the same as 2016.
 

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Well the 2018 Sonata plugin is not showing up on the Hyundai web site. Hopefully, they have seen the light and pulled the plug on it.



The batteries are better used in a vehicle worth buying.
 

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The "travel link" is $2. a month from SirusXM. I believe that is a subscription price added to a standard Sirius radio account. If you don't have an account to attach that to, it will be higher. I did see something from Hyundai about all this stuff for free in some YouTube video. I finally found out it was attached to HD radio (traffic - weather- events), but only if you were listening to a HD station. If you go out of the range of that HD radio station, you would have to find another HD radio station to get that information for free on your screen. NJ has ONE HD station.

The other writer is correct. Any smartphone will give you the same info, so just ask Siri or Google.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Finally, I was able to locate 2018 Sonata PHEVs in stock! I have been checking on Edmunds for the last several weeks and kept receiving no inventory. I live in the San Francisco Bay Area and have been entering my zip code with a 200 mile range. Today I tried again and once again and found no inventory for my search. I then went ahead and adjusted the range to 500 miles. With that search, I found several in stock (all between 400 to 500 miles from the San Francisco Bay Area and in Southern California. A few of the dealerships I noticed were in Anahiem, Huntington Beach and San Diego.

It is kind of strange that they are releasing a 2018 model and it into August before it is in stock anywhere! Makes you wonder if it would have made more sense to have gone ahead and released it as a 2019.
 

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It makes more sense for them to pull the plug on the Sonata plug-in, design a new midsize SUV plug-in hybrid that can get 40 to 50 miles on a single charge, and concentrate their effort on building enough Kona EVs in the short term.
 

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It makes more sense for them to pull the plug on the Sonata plug-in, design a new midsize SUV plug-in hybrid that can get 40 to 50 miles on a single charge, and concentrate their effort on building enough Kona EVs in the short term.
I've been hearing good things about the Kona EV. Apparently the range on it rivals the Tesla, close to 300 miles per charge.
 

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I've been hearing good things about the Kona EV. Apparently the range on it rivals the Tesla, close to 300 miles per charge.

If they can make enough of them, Hyundai will give the Chevy Bolt and Nissan Leaf a bit of challenge.



Apparently, they can be built with a short range battery and long range battery, with the long range battery scheduled for North America.



The big question is can Hyundai get enough batteries and will the dealers actually try to sell them.



If the federal government allowed any unused tax credit to be carried over into the following years that would help sales too.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
It makes more sense for them to pull the plug on the Sonata plug-in, design a new midsize SUV plug-in hybrid that can get 40 to 50 miles on a single charge, and concentrate their effort on building enough Kona EVs in the short term.

It is clear that Hyundai is not currently competing in the U.S. market. Their sells for the year to date are listed below:


Ioniq PHEV 981

Sonata PHEV 351

Ioniq EV 198


Mean while, other PHEV sales have been very strong. The top three PHEV sellers (year to date) are listed below:

Toyota Prius Prime 16,000
Chevy Volt 9,000
Honda Clarity 8,000

I would think that the Ioniq PHEV could sell much better. It compares very favorable to the Prime.

I think, however, the Sonata PHEV is clearly out ranked by the Honda Clarity. The Clarity has far better range, almost the same amount of cabin space and a trunk 50% larger.


You have a good point that for the short term, Hyundai might be best off focusing on producing as many of the Kona PHEVs as possible. The question is if they can ramp up to the production levels for EVs and PHEV to the levels that Toyota and Honda.
 

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You have a good point that for the short term, Hyundai might be best off focusing on producing as many of the Kona PHEVs as possible. The question is if they can ramp up to the production levels for EVs and PHEV to the levels that Toyota and Honda.[/QUOTE]



Sorry for the typo above, it should be "producing as many of the Kona EVs as possible."
 
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