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wtf? u can't even tell it's there on a black car what are u saying?

so your saying the new bmw 3 series with upgraded rear diffuser bumper looks worse ? it has a diffuser now, the white and silver ones look very different and look really good!

do

QUOTE (smackattak @ Aug 3 2010, 07:29 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=346930
Looks okay on the black car, but super chintzy on the silver... IMO
 

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QUOTE (mayasonata @ Aug 3 2010, 07:38 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=346933
wtf? u can't even tell it's there on a black car what are u saying?

so your saying the new bmw 3 series with upgraded rear diffuser bumper looks worse ? it has a diffuser now, the white and silver ones look very different and look really good!

do
Alright...you're entitled to think they look good...and I'm entitled to think they don't. Don't see a need to jump down my throat about the issue.
 

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Definitely helps my whole "red and black" theme that I'm still going for. Would be nice if they pre-cut the holes for me. What do you say, Boogyman? :D
 

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ray I think it will look good on your car, but u have the dual exhaust already so an upgrade isn't that much necessary....but it does make the bumper look like it's double stacked; giving it a more aggressive euro look. I think I'm gonna go for this.

QUOTE (Rayosis @ Aug 3 2010, 08:00 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=346937
Definitely helps my whole "red and black" theme that I'm still going for. Would be nice if they pre-cut the holes for me. What do you say, Boogyman? :D
 

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If I had a white car, I'd be all over this, but I think it will make little to no difference on my black car.
 

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QUOTE (Rayosis @ Aug 3 2010, 08:00 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=346937
Definitely helps my whole "red and black" theme that I'm still going for. Would be nice if they pre-cut the holes for me. What do you say, Boogyman? :D
We can precut the holes for you if you wish, but it may be better if you do it yourself, or have it cut at the place where you get it installed, in order to get a good fit with the exhaust.
 

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QUOTE (boogyman @ Aug 3 2010, 08:20 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=346980
We can precut the holes for you if you wish, but it may be better if you do it yourself, or have it cut at the place where you get it installed, in order to get a good fit with the exhaust.
So weird that the boogyman is so much more nicer than legends say he is. :p Well, I was gonna do it myself since everywhere kinda charges for a pretty hefty price so thats why it would be great if I can get it while some work done already.
 

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I like it. Seems like an ideal fix for those without the SE dual that want the tips to show being single or dual and are not sure if they can cut the bumper right.
 

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I actually think this looks sharp. Ive always liked cars that have the "two tone" lower bumper like this. I wouldnt even paint it. The unpainted black plastic would be a nice accent to any color, especially red.

The only concern I have is how the cutouts would look. You would need to have a very steady hand to cut the exhaust holes (especially on the SE) to look nice. I would think you would need to heat up the cuts to sorta "melt" the cuts so that they are smoothened out.
 

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Any of you who actually get this, please post pics for the rest of us to make up our minds......

Thanks....

Q
 

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QUOTE (jdugan4859 @ Aug 3 2010, 11:03 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=346972
This dude is gonna make me get a second job
I totally agree with this statement. :w00t:
QUOTE (chitown1211 @ Aug 4 2010, 02:02 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=347116
What "performance" will this performance difusser add to a Sonata?
This too. Anybody know if this improves performance or is just for looks?

EDIT: okay gonna answer my own question.
What is a diffuser:
A diffuser is a shaped part of a car's body, usually found in the underside of the car. It can be located at the rear underside, or closer to the front underside near the wheel wells. A rear diffuser is typically sloped upward from front-to-back, and may have vertical fins attached to the bottom of the sloped surface. The rest of this article will apply, for the most part, to the rear diffuser.

The diffuser has two (2) purposes:
1. To reduce drag.
2. To reduce lift.

What goes on at the rear-end of a car:
The area immediately behind the car tends to have turbulent, slow-moving air. The fast underbody air that exits the car ends up meeting with this slow-moving outside air. The greater the air speed difference is, the more turbulence is created. This turbulence causes unwanted drag and disrupts the airflow that exits from the underbody, which in turn decreases the underbody's ability to reduce lift.

How the diffuser works:
The diffuser itself does not actually create downforce - it works in conjunction with other aerodynamic components to reduce drag and lift. The upward front-to-back angle of the rear diffuser causes the fast-moving underbody air to expand and slow down. This slower air is then better able to meet up with the slow outside air, thus reducing the amount of turbulence behind the car. The vertical fins are there to make sure that the air at the rear left and right sides do not disturb the function of the diffuser.

When is a diffuser effective:
As a general guideline, the rear diffuser needs to be angled upward at least 10 degrees. In order for a rear diffuser to be effective, the air that travels under the car from the front needs to be as fast and smooth as possible. Slow-moving, turbulent air is not going to help a diffuser do its job.

In order to create the smooth air that the diffuser needs, it is recommended that the car have a flat undertray (a.k.a. underbody) that covers most of the uneven surfaces and components on the cars bottomside. However, production road cars typically do not have, or only partially have, an area that is covered by a flat undertray.
 

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QUOTE (boogyman @ Aug 3 2010, 11:20 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=346980
We can precut the holes for you if you wish, but it may be better if you do it yourself, or have it cut at the place where you get it installed, in order to get a good fit with the exhaust.
This question is for Boogyman:
If we were to order this item from you (SR), you say you could pre-cut the holes for us, How do we let you know that we want this pre-cutting done by you? During the ordering phase or do we need to contact someone directly?
 

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QUOTE (glenn716 @ Aug 4 2010, 03:32 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=347160
This question is for Boogyman:
If we were to order this item from you (SR), you say you could pre-cut the holes for us, How do we let you know that we want this pre-cutting done by you? During the ordering phase or do we need to contact someone directly?
Okay, maybe I was a bit hasty in the offer. :grin: However, since I did make the offer, we'll precut the holes for anyone who wants it for the month of August only. Just include a comment in the Comments section of the order form when you place an order, or send us an email with the request and your order number. Be sure to specify if you want the right hole cut or both holes cut.

I haven't cut this yet, so I have no idea how long it will take. If it's a 5 minute job, we'll probably just offer it for forum members indefinitely. If it takes more than, say, a half hour, then we will probably start charging a small fee for doing so.

For now, we will cut the holes for free, until August 31.
 

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In the most simplest of terms, its just for looks - two key components are lacking in this equation: sufficient speed, and flat underbody. Its a 4-cylinder family sedan! lol!!!

Something simpler and less expensive I've been considering to contrast the color of mine is to tape off the lower lenses and do magic with spray tint. I've done a number of vehicles and it looks great. That way, it looks like exhaust ports...

Just sayin...

Rich

QUOTE (glenn716 @ Aug 4 2010, 02:35 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=347120
I totally agree with this statement. :w00t:

This too. Anybody know if this improves performance or is just for looks?

EDIT: okay gonna answer my own question.
What is a diffuser:
A diffuser is a shaped part of a car's body, usually found in the underside of the car. It can be located at the rear underside, or closer to the front underside near the wheel wells. A rear diffuser is typically sloped upward from front-to-back, and may have vertical fins attached to the bottom of the sloped surface. The rest of this article will apply, for the most part, to the rear diffuser.

The diffuser has two (2) purposes:
1. To reduce drag.
2. To reduce lift.

What goes on at the rear-end of a car:
The area immediately behind the car tends to have turbulent, slow-moving air. The fast underbody air that exits the car ends up meeting with this slow-moving outside air. The greater the air speed difference is, the more turbulence is created. This turbulence causes unwanted drag and disrupts the airflow that exits from the underbody, which in turn decreases the underbody's ability to reduce lift.

How the diffuser works:
The diffuser itself does not actually create downforce - it works in conjunction with other aerodynamic components to reduce drag and lift. The upward front-to-back angle of the rear diffuser causes the fast-moving underbody air to expand and slow down. This slower air is then better able to meet up with the slow outside air, thus reducing the amount of turbulence behind the car. The vertical fins are there to make sure that the air at the rear left and right sides do not disturb the function of the diffuser.

When is a diffuser effective:
As a general guideline, the rear diffuser needs to be angled upward at least 10 degrees. In order for a rear diffuser to be effective, the air that travels under the car from the front needs to be as fast and smooth as possible. Slow-moving, turbulent air is not going to help a diffuser do its job.

In order to create the smooth air that the diffuser needs, it is recommended that the car have a flat undertray (a.k.a. underbody) that covers most of the uneven surfaces and components on the cars bottomside. However, production road cars typically do not have, or only partially have, an area that is covered by a flat undertray.
 
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