Hyundai Forums banner
21 - 31 of 31 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
This is interesting. I have a case like this problem and found its the hybrid battery assy problem. I would like to know what fixes this vehicle. Thanks
In my case, Hyundai eventually replaced the ECM but still no change. About two weeks ago they agreed to buy the car back. Cause of death was never determined. I liked the car but the communication from the service team and Hyundai USA was horrible. For that reason, I am done with Hyundai.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
In my case, Hyundai eventually replaced the ECM but still no change. About two weeks ago they agreed to buy the car back. Cause of death was never determined. I liked the car but the communication from the service team and Hyundai USA was horrible. For that reason, I am done with Hyundai.
When they offered to buy your car back did you get your dealer fees taxes etc. back? I am dealing with a 22 Santa Fe with a chronic shifter problem, less than 2000 miles been in the shop four times and currently still there. They offered to let me trade it in, it's less than two months old and I was going to lose quite a bit of money so I definitely didn't do that route. They're still working on that part but I am actively looking into the lemon law which I really don't want to do, but quite certain I qualify. Curious about your buyback situation. I even have a family member that works at this dealership and seem to be getting nowhere.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
When they offered to buy your car back did you get your dealer fees taxes etc. back? I am dealing with a 22 Santa Fe with a chronic shifter problem, less than 2000 miles been in the shop four times and currently still there. They offered to let me trade it in, it's less than two months old and I was going to lose quite a bit of money so I definitely didn't do that route. They're still working on that part but I am actively looking into the lemon law which I really don't want to do, but quite certain I qualify. Curious about your buyback situation. I even have a family member that works at this dealership and seem to be getting nowhere.
At first, HyundaUSA suggested that I approach the sales department and ask about a trade in. For a brief second, I considered it and then realized just what you asked; I would eat all the fees and added costs (taxes, title, dealer prep, etc) and pay them all over again with another vehicle. That was when I went to the Better Business Bureau, which manages Lemon Law claims in most states and for most manufacturers. Once that was filed, things started to move. Hyundai agreed to buy back the car with all fees (less miles). It took about 3 weeks for the refund determination and settlement signature. Then about another two weeks for an agent to deliver the check in person. In fact, it was the agent, a third party employee, who was the only person to ever acknowledge the massive inconvenience caused. Go to your Warranty guide and follow the instructions for a Lemon Law claim. Last point: I still get my monthly Hyundai app vehicle health reports that show all green check marks and my vehicle in good health. What a joke. Like I said in an earlier post, I’m done with the brand. I went with Mazda. Shorter warranty, sure, but a more reliable vehicle and, after all, what good is a warranty if the manufacturer doesn’t stand by the vehicle and leaves the owner stranded?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
At first, HyundaUSA suggested that I approach the sales department and ask about a trade in. For a brief second, I considered it and then realized just what you asked; I would eat all the fees and added costs (taxes, title, dealer prep, etc) and pay them all over again with another vehicle. That was when I went to the Better Business Bureau, which manages Lemon Law claims in most states and for most manufacturers. Once that was filed, things started to move. Hyundai agreed to buy back the car with all fees (less miles). It took about 3 weeks for the refund determination and settlement signature. Then about another two weeks for an agent to deliver the check in person. In fact, it was the agent, a third party employee, who was the only person to ever acknowledge the massive inconvenience caused. Go to your Warranty guide and follow the instructions for a Lemon Law claim. Last point: I still get my monthly Hyundai app vehicle health reports that show all green check marks and my vehicle in good health. What a joke. Like I said in an earlier post, I’m done with the brand. I went with Mazda. Shorter warranty, sure, but a more reliable vehicle and, after all, what good is a warranty if the manufacturer doesn’t stand by the vehicle and leaves the owner stranded?
Thank you for the valuable information, when you filed your claim did you need a lawyer? I did some googling in Florida, the state I live in, has a website for arbitration for lemon law something to that effect. Was going to start there. Afraid to talk to too many people because I don't trust most and especially no one at a car dealership even though I have a family member there.

Did they give you a loaner car? Were you able to use it during the whole process? I am currently in a loaner/rental I would not want to pay for this while taking legal action should my car never get out of the shop.

I also have extreme anxiety when it comes to thinking about driving this car that has failed four times! The only positive thing I can think of is it typically fails when you're putting it into park or reverse so it's not like it just conks out on the highway. But the reason I typically keep a newer car even if it means a car payment is for the reliability aspect of it I don't want to be broken on the side of the road - terrifying thought- I know I can happen with any vehicle but it should be much much less with a newer vehicle and this particular one has less than 2000 miles!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Thank you for the valuable information, when you filed your claim did you need a lawyer? I did some googling in Florida, the state I live in, has a website for arbitration for lemon law something to that effect. Was going to start there. Afraid to talk to too many people because I don't trust most and especially no one at a car dealership even though I have a family member there.

Did they give you a loaner car? Were you able to use it during the whole process? I am currently in a loaner/rental I would not want to pay for this while taking legal action should my car never get out of the shop.

I also have extreme anxiety when it comes to thinking about driving this car that has failed four times! The only positive thing I can think of is it typically fails when you're putting it into park or reverse so it's not like it just conks out on the highway. But the reason I typically keep a newer car even if it means a car payment is for the reliability aspect of it I don't want to be broken on the side of the road - terrifying thought- I know I can happen with any vehicle but it should be much much less with a newer vehicle and this particular one has less than 2000 miles!
So, I was getting the cold shoulder from the dealer: no info, not returning my calls, constantly switching service advisors. Same thing from Hyundai USA. I bought my car in VA (the Lemon Law that applies is the state where you bought the car) so I reached out to a consumer protection lawyer who suggested that I play it out through BBB first. I filed a claim online and from there it seemed to move forward. They contacted Hyundai USA and a week or so later, Hyundai agreed to buy the car back. I was in a rental car arranged by the dealer when the vehicle was first towed in. I was assured by Hyundai USA that the rental would be covered until the matter was settled. If you don’t have a rental provided, your state may allow the cost to be included in the settlement (that’s the case for VA) but it was moot since it was covered by the dealer for me. Once BBB was working for me, things moved along (albeit slower than I would have preferred). In the claim process, you have the opportunity to suggest how you would like to resolve the matter. If you like the car and just want another, you can ask for a replacement vehicle or a buy back. Also, I was given the option to keep the car and get $7000 cash, but that option only applied if the car was running at the time of settlement. Since the car remains dead and disassembled, that option was just like the car — a non-starter. And, I would have had to take the car as a salvage title. I never did see the upside to that. I went for the buy out and ran from the whole thing. (FWIW, take a look at Hyundai USA’s Facebook page and you’ll find a lot of people in similar situations of trying navigate HUSA’s customer service. It’s not pretty.) Good luck and feel free to ask any questions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
So, I was getting the cold shoulder from the dealer: no info, not returning my calls, constantly switching service advisors. Same thing from Hyundai USA. I bought my car in VA (the Lemon Law that applies is the state where you bought the car) so I reached out to a consumer protection lawyer who suggested that I play it out through BBB first. I filed a claim online and from there it seemed to move forward. They contacted Hyundai USA and a week or so later, Hyundai agreed to buy the car back. I was in a rental car arranged by the dealer when the vehicle was first towed in. I was assured by Hyundai USA that the rental would be covered until the matter was settled. If you don’t have a rental provided, your state may allow the cost to be included in the settlement (that’s the case for VA) but it was moot since it was covered by the dealer for me. Once BBB was working for me, things moved along (albeit slower than I would have preferred). In the claim process, you have the opportunity to suggest how you would like to resolve the matter. If you like the car and just want another, you can ask for a replacement vehicle or a buy back. Also, I was given the option to keep the car and get $7000 cash, but that option only applied if the car was running at the time of settlement. Since the car remains dead and disassembled, that option was just like the car — a non-starter. And, I would have had to take the car as a salvage title. I never did see the upside to that. I went for the buy out and ran from the whole thing. (FWIW, take a look at Hyundai USA’s Facebook page and you’ll find a lot of people in similar situations of trying navigate HUSA’s customer service. It’s not pretty.) Good luck and feel free to ask any questions.
Wow thank you so much! I think I will look into the BBB tomorrow and take steps from there I am sure I will have more questions so thank you for the invite I'll probably drive you crazy lol! Trading it in is definitely not an option - I know the owner of the dealership and there's a small chance he will do me right without all this rigmarole but I'm not holding my breath. It's no skin off his back it's just business if Hyundai has to buy it back I don't think the dealership is affected. Again thank you so much for pointing me in the right direction !!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
My car has been in the shop for 27 days as of today may be another month before they get a replacement battery I think I will give them a chance to buy back the car if not I will go with the lemon law. If you win the case the Title has to be branded a Lemon that would cut the cars wholesale value in half. In NY if you have less than 12000 miles you get the full price paid for the car as long as it with 24 months or 18000 miles of the purchase date.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
I know it’s an old thread but I was wondering if you could share the outcome? There’s something wrong with our 2022 sonata hybrid battery, it’s totally dead if it sits 2-3 days so every weekend basically gotta go through the whole process of getting into it and getting it started and Hyundai is claiming hey designed it to do this. I started mediation and not sure how it’ll go. I hope you got another vehicle from them or your money back. I’m sorry you had to go through so much with your new vehicle too.
My car has been in the shop for 27 days as of today may be another month before they get a replacement battery I think I will give them a chance to buy back the car if not I will go with the lemon law. If you win the case the Title has to be branded a Lemon that would cut the cars wholesale value in half. In NY if you have less than 12000 miles you get the full price paid for the car as long as it with 24 months or 18000 miles of the purchase date.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
159 Posts
This post will not help any of you with your problems I'm afraid. I have had Hyundais and Kias ever since they came into this country, probably for about 30 years or so. To be honest I have never had any problems, and I am not in any way suggesting that your problems are not real. I have been on these forums for a while now and see many many posts asking about various problems with brand new cars. My present vehicle is a 2018 Kia Carens 7 seater which is coming to the end of it's financial life for me. BUT having read so many problems coming up with new Hyundais and Kias I do not think my next car will be either a Kia or a Hyundai. I also know this. If Hyundai do not sort out these problems PDQ they are going to lose customers very very fast. Their aftersales sevices appear to be rubbish as well but, somewhat, in their defence they probably have so many customers complaining that they do not know which way to turn and Hyundai/Kia corporate have quite possibly told them to say or do nothing to exacerbate the problems, much easier to stay stum rather than explain the unexplainable. As I say when I trade this car in I will not be buying another Kia or Hyundai. I have absolutely no proof or experience to back this post up it just seems to me the only logical explanation to Hyundai's seeming indifference.
 
21 - 31 of 31 Posts
Top