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Can anyone throw any light onto wwhy my fuel consumption is so low.
My hyundai santa fe 2.2 CRTD is 3 year old, has done just 7900 miles

I have never yet got more than 30 miles to the gallon.

I recently done 809 miles, brimmed the tank before and after and returned only 22 mpg!!

It has been back to the distributors twice......no problems found.

I have written to Hyundai twice, they have told me that the figures that they qoute for fuel consumtion are just a guide. I told them that i used the technical specification in making my decision to buy the Santa fe.

What are people getting MPG on this car.

It's automatic and a seven seater.

I am so disapointed!

HELP!!

Ron
 

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Ron, Not a scientific or necessarily accurate reply but.... I've got a 2007 manual, 5 seater. I guess the manual gearbox may make a slight difference.

I haven't done much in the way of accurate measurements but the Trip Meter indicator seems to return a pretty steady 37/38 mpg. I've done several trips down to southwest France heavily loaded (not towing though and nothing on the roof). Speed on the French autoroutes varying between around 70 to 85 mph, non-autoroute sections around 60mph. Distance from Calais around 540 miles. The indicator has given a reading of 37/38.

Running around in suburban Surrey also seems to give about the same. When I have aircon on it usually drops to low 37 (perhaps 36) mpg.

I've done the occasional fill the brim measurement and that seems to back up the indicator numbers.

Don't know if that helps.
 

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You've only done 7900 miles in 3 years, this indicates you don't go far, it's also auto. To get reasonable mpg you need to be in top gear for most of the time, if most of your driving is done in town or suburban areas then you will need to use the box as a semi auto and select top gear rather than allowing the box to select the gears.
Regarding you recent 809 mile trip, if it was mainly motorway and the speed was 70mph or lower then I don't understand especially as you say you normally get about 30mpg, are you sure you got your calculations correct, ie was the tank full when you reset the odometer or took the mileage reading. Most of us in the UK get between 22-28mpg towing caravans, average between 32 and 36mpg in normal driving. Check out HOCUK for more advice and and ways to improve mpg
 

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Hi Ron, I'm probably adding little to the comments already here, but I have a 2009 5 seat auto (can't imagine the two additional seats are that much of a weight penalty) and the car averages 34mpg according to the trip over 12000 miles in the first year. That's all weekend mileage too so generally longer runs, during which the car returns 38mpg at 70mph according to the satnav as the speedo is out at 70 by 5ish mph, 35mpg at 77mph with varying loads but not towing. Any faster than that and the economy drops right off. The trip is accurate if a little optimistic.

We did a fair bit of urban stop start driving stuff recently during heavy snows and the economy was little short of horrific, 22mpg according to the trip. Drive the car on the tiptronic side of the box and you realise the car is never in 5th gear and tends to hover in 3rd longer than I would when driving a manual diesel - there's possibly some economy savings to be had driving it manually.

All up I'd say the consumption you are experiencing is typical, even if a little painful with UK squirt prices!
 

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You guys should count yourself lucky you get the diesels over there. My 2.7 is getting 17.5 US MPG on mostly city driving and I recently got 18.3, the best I've gotten in a while. On the highway, I usually get 22 or 23 with 25 or higher being a VERY rare occurrence.
 

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Ouch, that is painful - that said, diesel at my local garage is £5.81 per imperial gallon (nearly US$9).

Do love the diesel drive though, hopefully it will make it over your way! Are diesel cars gaining in popularity generally?

Ron you could consider a tuning box, as if you adjust your driving style I achieved consistent mpg improvements in a CRV CDTI, but the temptation is that you develop a heavy right foot to make the most of the increased bhp/torque!
 

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QUOTE (lovemysantafe @ Apr 23 2010, 05:33 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=315881
You guys should count yourself lucky you get the diesels over there. My 2.7 is getting 17.5 US MPG on mostly city driving and I recently got 18.3, the best I've gotten in a while. On the highway, I usually get 22 or 23 with 25 or higher being a VERY rare occurrence.

Yeah but.... it's a good job we do. Look at the cost of petrol/ diesel in the UK.

The price keeps moving but the average cost for Diesel is 1.22 UK Pounds per Litre. There are 3.785 Litres to a US Gallon. Again a variable but the UK Pound/ US Dollar exchange rate is around 1.53 Dollars too the Pound today.

So my rough calculation gives an equivalent figure of around 7.065 US Dollars per US Gallon at UK prices. Bet you don't pay that. Btw, UK petrol prices are fairly similar to Diesel prices these days.

EDIT>>>>

I just realised that in order to give a reasonable comparison of mpg I should (as quoted earlier in the thread) I should have given the figures based on an Imperial (Uk) Gallon. This is 4.54 Litres to the Gallon. Therefore the equivalent US Dollar price would be 8.474.
 

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My local Shell station is charging about $2.96 per gallon for regular and something like $3.29 for diesel. Using today's exchange rate, that's £1.93 per US gallon for regular or £0.51 per liter.
 

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A friendly tip for improving consumption on the highway:

This weekend we did a 400-kilometer round trip tour, and my Santa Fe 3.3 averaged 8.4 litres per 100 km; exactly what Transport Canada rates it for. And that was carrying four passengers at 100-110 km/h with the air conditioner on. Other than the beautiful weather, the only "cheat" was to set my speed slightly below the cars in front of me, instead of trying to match their speed or blowing past them.

It's a very subtle difference, but it means never touching the brakes or throttle; cruise control all the way. It also means spending more time in other vehicles' slipstreams, which saves a bit of fuel too. And if you can get used to feeling like one of the slower cars, the trip is more relaxed because you never feel traffic congestion; the gap in front of you is always growing. Do the math... it only costs you 10 or 15 extra minutes on a two-hour run, time which is easily recovered by not griping on the internet afterwards about your fuel consumption. :57:
 

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QUOTE (Don67 @ Apr 26 2010, 11:10 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=317138
A friendly tip for improving consumption on the highway:

This weekend we did a 400-kilometer round trip tour, and my Santa Fe 3.3 averaged 8.4 litres per 100 km; exactly what Transport Canada rates it for. And that was carrying four passengers at 100-110 km/h with the air conditioner on. Other than the beautiful weather, the only "cheat" was to set my speed slightly below the cars in front of me, instead of trying to match their speed or blowing past them.

It's a very subtle difference, but it means never touching the brakes or throttle; cruise control all the way. It also means spending more time in other vehicles' slipstreams, which saves a bit of fuel too. And if you can get used to feeling like one of the slower cars, the trip is more relaxed because you never feel traffic congestion; the gap in front of you is always growing. Do the math... it only costs you 10 or 15 extra minutes on a two-hour run, time which is easily recovered by not griping on the internet afterwards about your fuel consumption. :57:

I would agree 100% on that tip but sometimes feels frustrated when you know you can go lot faster... :whistling:
 

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When I was on my road trip last summer I was on Interstate 10 through central Louisiana in the sweltering heat and humidity so naturally I had the A/C going. With the speed limit at 70 mph, I found that if I set my cruise control at 72 mph (by GPS, not the speedometer) I would stay in a pocket between the fast and slow traffic. It worked beautifully and I think I drove 25 or 30 miles without touching my speed or being passed by another car going the same direction.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks for all of your comments. Nothing seems to have changed as i have done most of the things suggested, ie driving in sports mode, I always brim the tank wghen checking.
I just think that Hyundai were right. The technical information was just made up!

Do you know that they do not do the tests? They are done at Goverment establishments and done on a rolling road........not a very good way uhh?

Thanks again all

Ron
 

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Hello all,

I have a 2010 AWD V6.
I'm getting 11.8 L/100km actual millage. (details are in table below) I drive ~40% hwy. I really hope that the # improves once it's broken in.
I was expecting somewhere closer to 9.5L/100km based on the 10.5 City & 7.7 Hwy that Hyundai advertizes.

Km L L/100km Miles Gal Mpg
538 62.2 11.56 334.3 16.4 20.3
517 59.5 11.49 321.7 15.7 20.5
515 59.7 11.58 320.3 15.8 20.3
444 55.9 12.57 276.3 14.8 18.7
 

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Hey Renius, welcome to the forum.

Your mileage might improve slightly with break-in, but don't get your hopes too high. The Transport Canada "highway" rating requires you to cruise on flat ground at a steady 80 km/h. Any deviation from this, including stops, hills, headwinds, extra passengers, etc. will cause a noticeable jump in consumption.

The Transport Canada "city" ratings are even more more elusive. The trick is to accelerate slowly, and anticipate traffic trends 2 blocks ahead so you can avoid the brakes as much as possible. I find that it takes all of my concentration to achieve the city rating in the city.
 

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On my second Santa Fe now - 2007 2.2 CRDI Auto Commercial. Just calculated my first tank and was shocked to get 22mpg! Most of my driving is short trips around my town which has a lot of hills so I wasn't expecting much but my old 2002 2.0 CRDI Manual never did less that 27mpg for me. Gonna try to use the semi-auto more for the next few tanks and see how I do, maybe I've just been a bit over-eager with the novelty of the new car!
Eventually plan on getting a remap done, I've heard they work great - better than the boxes anyhow. I'd imagine the extra torque would help on the hills!
 

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QUOTE (Renius @ May 11 2010, 02:36 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=321807
Hello all,

I have a 2010 AWD V6.
I'm getting 11.8 L/100km actual millage. (details are in table below) I drive ~40% hwy. I really hope that the # improves once it's broken in.
I was expecting somewhere closer to 9.5L/100km based on the 10.5 City & 7.7 Hwy that Hyundai advertizes.

Km L L/100km Miles Gal Mpg
538 62.2 11.56 334.3 16.4 20.3
517 59.5 11.49 321.7 15.7 20.5
515 59.7 11.58 320.3 15.8 20.3
444 55.9 12.57 276.3 14.8 18.7


Hi,

I have a 2009 Limited. 3.3L with 5 speed auto. I've had it for 1.5 years now and my overall average is 12.6 L/Km. So pretty much consistant with your ratings, considering the 2010 should have a better fuel consumption. This is OVERALL average, including idle, accelerations, ... According to my trip computer I do 11.5L/100km when crusing on the highway. But that's still higher than what is advertised by the manufacturer. I am disappointed. I have all the datas. It's fairly close to what Consumer's report experienced though.


I drive 70% highways. 110-120km/h. I try to reduce in some ways: no roof rack, high pressure in tires, slow acceleration, avoid AC when I can, turn off the engin when I can, ...

In the first few months it was more like 13. It has decreased slowly since then.

I am also experimenting using super. I'll be able to tell the difference soon.

At about 2600km I had a huge surge of gas consumption. It lasted 2 gas tanks, 600km. I did not noticed while driving. I noticed after compiling the numbers. This kind of messes up my numbers, because it's not normal. I am glad this never happened again.
I heard Hyundai's breaks sometimes stick, just lightly, to the rotors. Not enough that you really notice, but just enough to increase the consumption. A friend of mine with a brand new Sonata 2008 had to replace both rear break pads AND ROTORS after only a year.

I just got a #3 tune-up and things got somewhat better, too soon to tell for sure. Same for using super.

NBi
 

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Santa Fee

Hello all,
Thanks for sharing these valuable info. on Hyundai Santa Fee. If I may add my story too, I am also disappointed as did Ron and others. I have Hyundai Santa Fe 2.4 petrol (automatic) that I bought three months ago. I just covered 2215 km and all through I have checked the fuel consumption and it is very disappointing. I am always driving it in the town but I was not at all expecting consumption of 17.2 L/100 km. I took the car to the dealer who tells me new theories that I could not swallow in the first place. In fact he finally advised me to live with such consumption as long as I am driving it in the town. One of the new theories for me is that the car will consume as much fuel while idling (at rest) for one hour as while driving it on the high way for one hour. I could not believe this. My only hope now is that it will improve after 3000 kms . I am happy to have any advice on this.
All the best
Jaagama
 

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Hi Ron, welcome to the forum.

I'm driving a 2011 manual model which has the more powerful R series engine and new gearbox, but you do seem to be getting below what would be expected. I get Low 30s in town and around 40 out of it.

A few factors to consider.
The Santa Fe is (at least outside the US) a big heavy car, stop start town driving takes it toll on mpg. Having the older gearbox, I am told with its low bottom two ratios then a big step up to third may not be ideal for efficiency. It does have its place off road and when towing though.
I used to run a Mazda5 2.0D. It had a Diesel particulate filter DPF in the exhaust system to get the older engine up to modern emission standards. The trouble is DPFs tend to clog up in town or gentle driving. At high exhaust temperatures the particulates (fine diesel soot) burn off in the DPF, so a blast down a fast road is a good thing. If the car detects the DPF getting clogged it goes into a regeneration mode. To clean the DPF the injectors add fuel late in the combustion so unburnt fuel passes through the engine into the DPF to wash it. This then returns to the engine via an exhaust gas recirculation system. The extra fuel ends up in your sump ( which is why the engine oil has to be DPF compatible ) and if hot then evaporates. If cold your oil level goes up. This extra fuel in DPF regeneration wrecks your mpg figures.

There are many possible causes of poor mpg (blocked injectors, faulty turbo, sensors....) but if the car gets a lot of short journeys (DPF still cold) or town driving, or even gentle motorway cruising the DPF regeneration could be a cause. If your oil level is climbing that would confirm this. Go for a blast on an open road and see if things get better.

Newer diesels were designed to have DPFs from day one and they are often closer to the exhaust manifold. The higher temps mean they work better. Or sometimes additives are used to raise the gas temps.
 
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