Hyundai Forums banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 20 of 44 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hello everyone,

I am new here and have been reading many posts on this forum for the past few days and have learned a lot. I am getting ready to lease a new Sonata (first time leasing) and I know I want to go with the Limited trim but I keep going back and forth between the gas and hybrid. I know with the gasoline version I would get the sunroof and smart park, with the hybrid I get the solar roof. As of right now I do not do much driving aside from errands and taking my dad places, perk of working from home. But in the next year or so that could change which is why I was considering the hybrid.

One of my local dealers broke this deal down for me on a Hybrid Limited-

Purchase- $37,115

Dealer Discount- $4,000

Rebates- $5,000
-$500 military
-$3,750 lease cash
-$750 lease cash

Agreed Upon Value- $27,615

Accessories- $129

Balance- $27,744

Down Payment- $3,000

36 months @ 12,000 mi

Monthly- $305

If I go with the gas version it's close to that since it's a few thousand cheaper but doesn't have as much rebates.

Any help would be appreciated!


Sent from my Pixel 3 XL using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
Well it looks like I am going to have to go with the gas version, the only Hybrid Limited I could find in a 200 mile radius was a white with grey/tan interior which I do not want.

Sent from my Pixel 3 XL using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
2017 Sonata Sport 2.0T
Joined
·
1,556 Posts
Well it looks like I am going to have to go with the gas version, the only Hybrid Limited I could find in a 200 mile radius was a white with grey/tan interior which I do not want.

Sent from my Pixel 3 XL using Tapatalk
Why lease, especially if you dont drive much. Unless you can write it off on your business with a lease you are renting a car and making payments to sit in your driveway and in 3 years give it back with no equity.

The deal you quoted has you paying a total of $ 13,980 almost half the value of the $ 27,000 car and then giving it back with nothing to show for it. If you purchase it on a 72 month loan the payment will be about the same and even if you turn it over before paying it off you will probably have some equity in the car.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
457 Posts
Good choice on the gas version. Hybrids are nice until they break down and then $$$$$$.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,028 Posts
one of the reviews i read that the slow speed braking is weird. we are waiting for the elantra hybrid. from what i have read so far, it is just like the sonata, except no hud, which i really like. i hope they dont go dumb on stuff like big wheels, and, again, the transmission
 

·
Registered
2012 Sonata 2.0t Ltd & 2020 Palisade Ltd
Joined
·
618 Posts
Why lease, especially if you dont drive much.
Without getting into the pros and cons of leasing (and I'm not suggesting that the lease deal above is good), that statement doesn't make sense: leasing is better if you drive less than if you drive more.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
81 Posts
Good choice on the gas version. Hybrids are nice until they break down and then $$$$$$.
Take this as you may , All the hybrids are manufactured in Korea. The gas engines, which have a tendency to self destruct because of swarf in the crankshaft come out of Alabama. My hybrid shows no signs of problems yet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
457 Posts
Take this as you may , All the hybrids are manufactured in Korea. The gas engines, which have a tendency to self destruct because of swarf in the crankshaft come out of Alabama. My hybrid shows no signs of problems yet.
Doesn't really matter to me either way. I'll never own a Hybrid regardless of manufacturer nor a 4-cyl Hyundai.
 

·
Registered
2020 Sonata SEL Plus
Joined
·
98 Posts
While not Hyundai, I owned 2 Prius, put 150k on the last one which I traded at 8 years old. Both ran perfect, never in the shop. Ran so good my brother-in-law, son, and cousins bought them too, and non have had any issues and they keep buying them. My wife wanted another but the stupid dealer wouldn't come down on the one she wanted. As I said, these were Toyotas and nobody I know has had an issue except a friend who's window switch broke. He still loves his.
 

·
Registered
2012 Sonata 2.0t Ltd & 2020 Palisade Ltd
Joined
·
618 Posts
Take this as you may , All the hybrids are manufactured in Korea. The gas engines, which have a tendency to self destruct because of swarf in the crankshaft come out of Alabama. My hybrid shows no signs of problems yet.
The 2020 Sonata, Hybrid or otherwise, no longer uses the Theta II engine that had issues in the previous generations.

And the issues with the Theta II went far beyond the debris left in the crankshaft in Alabama. The engine design was fundamentally flawed. There is a massive thread on this motor in the YF Sonata forum. Just because yours was built in Korea doesn't mean yours is immune. But I hope yours never goes bad.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
When I bought my Sonata Limited last month, the lease vs. buy option was clearly in favor of buying. In order for a lease to come out ahead, the value of my car after 3 years would need to be under $14k for a private sale/trade-in. I sure am hoping it holds value a bit better than that! But who knows, with the glut of cars that are going to come off leases with very low mileage in about 3 years from now. :)
 

·
Registered
2020 Sonata Limited (White)
Joined
·
59 Posts
I had a 2017 hybrid. Put on 75,000 miles in 3 years with one minor problem. Other than that it was a dependable car. Averaged about 38 - 43 MPG (winter / summer) with mostly Hwy driving. The main reasons I switched to the gas engine was I like my gadgets and the 1.6T Limited had more/better than the 2020 hybrid will have, and if you get the Limited in the hybrid it only comes with the solar panel. I like my sunroof and almost always drive with it popped up for more airflow. Plus, the solar panel is advertised to give you 2 more miles a day. If you do mostly short-range driving it might be beneficial, but when you commute 130 miles a day, 2 miles just isn't worth it.

A majority of the problems Hyundai had with hybrids was with the plug-in hybrids. If I remember correctly there were a lot of charger problems specifically.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,028 Posts
I had a 2017 hybrid. Put on 75,000 miles in 3 years with one minor problem. Other than that it was a dependable car. Averaged about 38 - 43 MPG (winter / summer) with mostly Hwy driving. The main reasons I switched to the gas engine was I like my gadgets and the 1.6T Limited had more/better than the 2020 hybrid will have, and if you get the Limited in the hybrid it only comes with the solar panel. I like my sunroof and almost always drive with it popped up for more airflow. Plus, the solar panel is advertised to give you 2 more miles a day. If you do mostly short-range driving it might be beneficial, but when you commute 130 miles a day, 2 miles just isn't worth it.

A majority of the problems Hyundai had with hybrids was with the plug-in hybrids. If I remember correctly there were a lot of charger problems specifically.
a long time ago the mazda 929 had a solar panel roof option. it was used to power exhaust fans. when the inside reached a certain temp, the fans came on. i think that would be a great option here in texas
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
I don't use sunroof, I try to keep sun away from my head when I'm driving, plus I try to reduce wind noise as much as possible, never cared for the sunroof. As for the auto park it's a nice feature but it's useless unless other cars have it. I can only see use cause the parking spot is tight, but if you park, then the other drive will have difficulty and likely dent your car. So I don't see use for it unless other cars have it and we all park that way, otherwise find a different parking spot.

The Hybrid is quieter, I can't feel difference when the engines transition from Gas to Electric or both, it's seamless. It has the sunshade in the rear if you have children. And I'm averaging 50 mpg atm for both city and highway.

Also I don't trust the 1.6L Turbo, I think it's weird that the lower trim engine is superior to the Limited. Turbo with DI = horrible carbon build up maintenance later, the lower trim comes with the 2.5L naturally aspirated with dual injection. I don't see why the addition of a CVVD would offset the improvements of using a dual injection system on the lower trim. Considering the Limited 1.6T is still significantly slower than it's closest competitors Accord, Mazda6 and Camry, I'd rather have the overall more reliable, durable 2.5L with dual injection.

So if you want the lmited, given choice between the 1.6 Turbo vs Hybrid's 2.0L Atkinson, I'd take the hybrid, I expect the Atkinson engine to have less issues than a GDI w/ Turbo even if it has CVVD.

I also think the Hybrid Limited looks better than the Sonata Limited from the front with the chrome grill and accents on the lower bumper.

Go with the feature that are more important to you. Gas mileage is more important to me than sunroof or auto-park I would never use. And considering how well documented Hyundai DI w/ Turbo issues are, I don't want it. If Limited had option for the improved superior lower trim engine, maybe would consider it.
 

·
Registered
2012 Sonata 2.0t Ltd & 2020 Palisade Ltd
Joined
·
618 Posts
Also I don't trust the 1.6L Turbo, I think it's weird that the lower trim engine is superior to the Limited. Turbo with DI = horrible carbon build up maintenance later, the lower trim comes with the 2.5L naturally aspirated with dual injection. I don't see why the addition of a CVVD would offset the improvements of using a dual injection system on the lower trim. Considering the Limited 1.6T is still significantly slower than it's closest competitors Accord, Mazda6 and Camry, I'd rather have the overall more reliable, durable 2.5L with dual injection.

So if you want the lmited, given choice between the 1.6 Turbo vs Hybrid's 2.0L Atkinson, I'd take the hybrid, I expect the Atkinson engine to have less issues than a GDI w/ Turbo even if it has CVVD.

I also think the Hybrid Limited looks better than the Sonata Limited from the front with the chrome grill and accents on the lower bumper.

Go with the feature that are more important to you. Gas mileage is more important to me than sunroof or auto-park I would never use. And considering how well documented Hyundai DI w/ Turbo issues are, I don't want it. If Limited had option for the improved superior lower trim engine, maybe would consider it.
I am not sure what you're talking about here. All 3 engines on the 2020 Sonata are GDI only: the natually-aspirated 2.5L, the turbocharged 1.6L and the naturally-aspirated 2.0L in the Hybrid. None of them have dual-injection - they are all GDI. Those 3 engines are all new for 2020 ("SmartStream family").

The N-line Sonata coming later this year will have a turbocharged 2.5L SmartStream motor, which will have dual-injection: MPI and GDI. And it will have CVVT/CVVD, like the other 3 motors.

GDI does cause carbon build-up over time. MPI helps mitigate that. But I don't see what that has to do with being turbocharged. Carbon build-up happens either way. What Hyundai issues are you referring to? If you're referring to the Theta II engines, issues were not about carbon build-up and not just related to the turbo-charged models.

By the way, CVVD allows the motor to switch from Atkinson to Otto cycle on-demand, so it's not just an Atkinson-cycle motor.
 

·
Registered
2012 Sonata 2.0t Ltd & 2020 Palisade Ltd
Joined
·
618 Posts
Considering the Limited 1.6T is still significantly slower than it's closest competitors Accord, Mazda6 and Camry, I'd rather have the overall more reliable, durable 2.5L with dual injection.
Oh and this isn’t true. The Sonata compares to the Camry with the 2.5L naturally-aspirated engine and the Accord with the 1.5L turbocharged engine. You’re likely comparing to the Camry‘s V6 and the Accord’s 2.0T engines. The N-line Sonata will compete with those, not the 1.6T/2.5 Sonata.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
No the 2.5L is Dual Injection both port and GDI, same as Ford and Toyota, changed for obvious reasons stated. Also the engine capable of being Atkinson is the 2.5L not the 1.6T. It's why it has lot of people confused why Hyundai put the inferior engine in the Limited edition. Why you ask how turbo increases problems I dunno why, it's obvious and clearly proven turbo GDI are the worst of the bunch when it comes to carbon buildup issues. Aside from VW, Hyundai engines seem to have it the worst with those issues. Even compared to the non Turbo versions, Sonata is the slowest of the bunch, especially compared to Mazda6 which comes with some additional features like heated rear seats that I saw some in this forum mentioned they were surprised it was missing. Same with the passenger seat with that allows for more adjustments. 1.6T doesn't seem to do anything other than increase maintenance pain, it's not adding significant performance or fuel advantages compared to the 2.5L.

I also don't get why the base model of the gas versions SE looks better than the SEL and Limited. The black bumper makes accentuates that black grill even more, making it look narrower and wide. The elongated curves with short very angular shapes makes it look weird to me. The base version looks more luxury and quality to me.

We can differ in opinion, whatever, I think Hyundai was stupid for not allowing the consumer to choose, Turbo GDI with miniscule performance improvement and maintenance headache or go with the 2.5L with dual port and improved maintenance.
 

·
Registered
2012 Sonata 2.0t Ltd & 2020 Palisade Ltd
Joined
·
618 Posts
No the 2.5L is Dual Injection both port and GDI, same as Ford and Toyota, changed for obvious reasons stated. Also the engine capable of being Atkinson is the 2.5L not the 1.6T. It's why it has lot of people confused why Hyundai put the inferior engine in the Limited edition. Why you ask how turbo increases problems I dunno why, it's obvious and clearly proven turbo GDI are the worst of the bunch when it comes to carbon buildup issues. Aside from VW, Hyundai engines seem to have it the worst with those issues. Even compared to the non Turbo versions, Sonata is the slowest of the bunch, especially compared to Mazda6 which comes with some additional features like heated rear seats that I saw some in this forum mentioned they were surprised it was missing. Same with the passenger seat with that allows for more adjustments. 1.6T doesn't seem to do anything other than increase maintenance pain, it's not adding significant performance or fuel advantages compared to the 2.5L.

I also don't get why the base model of the gas versions SE looks better than the SEL and Limited. The black bumper makes accentuates that black grill even more, making it look narrower and wide. The elongated curves with short very angular shapes makes it look weird to me. The base version looks more luxury and quality to me.

We can differ in opinion, whatever, I think Hyundai was stupid for not allowing the consumer to choose, Turbo GDI with miniscule performance improvement and maintenance headache or go with the 2.5L with dual port and improved maintenance.
You’re wrong. The 2.5L isn’t dual-injection. It’s GDI only in the US. You can go to Hyundai’s website and clearly see that in the specs. Here’s the press release from last year stating the same thing: SONATA - Hyundai Newsroom.

Here’s also a full list of SmartStream engines used by Hyundai worldwide: Hyundai Smartstream engine - Wikipedia

You’ll notice the 2.5 non-turbo only had a GDI or MPI version, not both. The US gets the GDI version. The FR 2.5T that will go in the N-line Sonata has dual-injection. You’re confusing your engines.

I didn’t say the 2.5L wasn’t Atkinson. I said the CVVD allows for an engine to switch from Atkinson to Otto cycle on demand. The 1.6L Turbo has CVVD.

The 1.6L T isn’t the inferior engine. It’s the superior one. It offers torque over a wider range of RPM than the 2.5. CVVD makes it superior too. There’s no reason for the 2.5 to exist. Kia isn’t even offering it on their K5, sticking instead with the 1.6T.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
ROFL, glad you think Hyundai made two 2.5L updated engine one for KR and one for US. I will believe the reviewers who have spoken with Hyundai about changes to Sonata, but thank you for the Wikipedia link and some press sheet. But you will never convince me Hyundai would spend money and time to create an inferior 2.5L for US market. So weird around here Sonata SE is being advertised with 2.5L GDI MPI. Bunch of liars, wikipedia knows better.
 

·
Registered
2012 Sonata 2.0t Ltd & 2020 Palisade Ltd
Joined
·
618 Posts
ROFL, glad you think Hyundai made two 2.5L updated engine one for KR and one for US. I will believe the reviewers who have spoken with Hyundai about changes to Sonata, but thank you for the Wikipedia link and some press sheet. But you will never convince me Hyundai would spend money and time to create an inferior 2.5L for US market. So weird around here Sonata SE is being advertised with 2.5L GDI MPI. Bunch of liars, wikipedia knows better.
They’ve always had MPI and GDI for their engines. They always make them capable of either (even LPI in some markets). You can see these options on Hyundai’s worldwide website. GDI engines are not just for the US. Australia gets them too.
 
1 - 20 of 44 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top