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Discussion Starter #1
2007 Sonata

Rear rotors


After removing the caliper bracket and the set screw, what is holding the rotor from coming off? Do I have to remove the rubber plug and line it up with something?


I tapped lightly on the rotor and no movement. There is no rust that I can see. I don't want to start smacking the rotor to hard.





Thanks
 

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If you got the set screws out, then there's a little rust behind it holding it on. Go ahead, beat on it with a hammer now.
 

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Did you remember to leave the parking brake off? Mine came right off by hand and didn't even need any hammering or anything.
 

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QUOTE (jsinton @ Jun 27 2010, 12:26 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=336451
If you got the set screws out, then there's a little rust behind it holding it on. Go ahead, beat on it with a hammer now.

Yes the set screw is out and the parking brake is off. I just want to make sure there is not something else I need to do. I did tap on it with a hammer and I got nothing so before I use a bigger hammer I just want to make sure I am not missing anything.
 

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By "set screw" are you referring to the phillips screws which have to be jack hammered out?


Yes but in my case the screw came right out as there was no rust.
Screw is out, ebrake is off, caliper is off and rotor is not free to come off the hub. Did I miss something or do I need to start banging away?
 

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Take a 32oz ball peen and whack the rotor' hat on angle at the circumference of the hat.. couple whacks and the rotor should pop loose...
 

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I just ran into this problem Sunday and saw your post which did not help me get my rotors off so I thought I would post my findings.
Rear rotor removal on 2007 sonata
You must remove the rubber plug.
locate the hole in the 6 o'clock position
place flat head screwdriver in hole about 1 1/2 inch till you locate star adjuster.
Flip up wards three times, this will loosen ebrake internal brake pads
the rotor should turn either direction easily
if not the ebrake pads are still needing adjusted in
give rotor a gentle blow with hammer.
when you get the rotor off inspect the star adjuster, move it up and down, see where it is in relationship to the hub. this will help you when you do the other side
when you place the new rotor on adjust the ebake pads to the point you cannot turn the rotor, the back it in 3 to 4 clicks.

Simply beating the **** out of the rotor is not the way to go when the rotor is on the rear and uses internal ebrake pads.
Hope this helps someone.


PS the reason I had to change the rotors with only 35 k on them was that the factory pads are too tight in the shim set. The new pads I purchased were also too tight. I took 1/32 off each end with a grinder and file. They then slid easily by hand within the shim set. The outboard pad seems to stick on the front and rear of this model. I had to trim the front pads too. Same issue.
 

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QUOTE (kramerpage @ Jun 29 2010, 12:38 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=337015
Simply beating the **** out of the rotor is not the way to go when the rotor is on the rear and uses internal ebrake pads.
If the rotor rotates freely, then it is not the hand brake shoes cuasing the stuck rotor... it is rusted to the hub, wonking the rootr hat to break the rust is not going to hurt a thing... do it everyday. If the rotor from there on does not wiggle off freely or come off with moderate rotating, then shoes will need to be backed off slightly..

PS the reason I had to change the rotors with only 35 k on them was that the factory pads are too tight in the shim set. The new pads I purchased were also too tight. I took 1/32 off each end with a grinder and file. They then slid easily by hand within the shim set. The outboard pad seems to stick on the front and rear of this model. I had to trim the front pads too.

So you did not properly address the reason your pads were tight, you just worked around it.. your problem is rust has grown under the shims, effectively closing the clearances between pad and shim set.. remove the shims, and lose the rust on the pad holder bracket/caliper mounting and do it right..
 

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5/16 nut 1 1/2 " bolt
Put them both on.
Tighten them up to push on the rotor
If you use two nuts the one next the rotor tends to turn and expose the end of the bolt so keep an eye on it. Turn the other nut to make thing start pushing.
Keep an eye on the holes in the rotor to see if the show space forming.
Heat may be needed. Heat near the center of the spindle.
Try to do this without moving the star wheel an removing the rubber thing other wise you may be buying new ones like me.
One you have the rotor being pushed than hit it with a hammer. Then tighten up the bolts again and repeat.
Keep at it and keep thinking.
Good luck
I have a 2009 with 50 K miles and the rotors were just making all kinds of noise and delaminating. New York winters whole life of the car.
 

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This is quite the old thread. I live in Minnesota and I can attest to rotors just being rusted on. The answer is a BFH (big f***ing hammer). Put a lug nut a few threads on one of the studs to keep the rotor from flying across your garage. With the caliper and bracket removed, pound the **** out of the rotor from behind to knock it off. That's the fastest and easiest way I've found. If you're replacing rotors, who cares if you jack up the old one?

You can play with the e-brake all day if you want, but unless it's actually locked up and the wheel won't turn by hand like SBR said, it's not your problem. Also, to prevent this from happening again, always grind your hub surface clean and smooth and apply brake lube before installing your new rotor.
 
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