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I have a 2017 Elantra with around 40,328 miles. The car is not driven in heavy start stop traffic or harsh conditions frequently.

It’s the SE version with drum brakes in the back and the disc in the front.
 

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Require constant service if driven in road salt areas, those pad clips under the pads trap salt, expands and locks the pads, drums are not nearly so bad, that drum keeps most of the road salt out.

Test for drag is simple, lift the corner of the vehicle with a jack, spin the wheel, should spin easy, step on the brake and spin it again. See what happens. Dragging pad or shoe wears out the brakes quickly.

See many shops use a hammer to put in new pads, crooks or idiots, take your choice. You can get up to 1,500 psi brake pressure to push your pads or shoes, but you only get about 20"/Hg to release them, this isn't fare.

I use the transmission to slow down so my brakes last around 100K miles, not as good with my wife driving, but she's worth it. Just about everybody in town slams on their brakes at a stop sign, and slams on the gas to get moving again, not making any better time then driving sanely. Call them complete idiots to myself.
 

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I have a 2017 Elantra with around 40,328 miles. The car is not driven in heavy start stop traffic or harsh conditions frequently.
40k miles is very low in the life of brake pads. I drove my 2003 Elantra (which I bought new) to almost 100k miles before I had the pads replaced. If you take the car to a garage for an oil change and maintenance they will tell you what the condition of the brakes is.
 

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In answer to your title, I change my brake pads when they are almost at the minimum thickness. I replace the discs when they also are near the minimum thickness (or are warped or scored).
Your mechanic should advise you of this.
There is no requirement to replace them before they are worn out (unless your mechanic says there is another problem)
 

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Depends on various factors. Like others said, shops usually inspect the brakes when you go in for regular service. You can also peek through the wheels and see how much meat is left on the pads, if the rotors are scored/rusty, etc.
 

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Just changed mine and I had 52,000km... I am a bit hard on my braking someitmes.. like to drive it sometimes as if I am on a track(only when its clear and no other cars around me)... Last min braking to a stop or corner.. :)


I have a 2017 Elantra with around 40,328 miles. The car is not driven in heavy start stop traffic or harsh conditions frequently.

It’s the SE version with drum brakes in the back and the disc in the front.
 

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As needed...93 Sentra rear drums 150k. My 99 Saturn rear drums 200k. So I expect similar in my SE. Based on 15k inspection my front pads could go 80k or more. Now that I replaced tires with lifetime rotation I am sure the shop will let me know when front pads have minimum thickness. If I ever return to the dealership they have a form that has brake inspection as part of their multi point inspection.
 

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It depends on how you drive. I observe a lot of people following too closely. This causes them to use their brakes more than people who leave more distance. The folks who leave more distance don't have to constantly use their brakes to slow down--they slow down by simply releasing the gas pedal. If you're an "aggressive" driver, you will have to replace them more frequently than someone who drives less aggressively. But there is no one rule of thumb mileage-wise. The more you use them, the sooner you will have to replace them.
 

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I've got 86k on my 2017 SE with the original brakes. It's a manual though, so I think it's less wear on the brakes overall....
 
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