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Well said Dtech. We have had owners in the past that had to drive for one or more miles on roads that were not maintained during the winter (Not plowed) or that had ridiculously long driveways (Perhaps up to a mile long) because they wanted their home to be isolated from the neighbors and the (GM) AWD systems were not up to their expectations. They really needed a true 4WD vehicle or at the very least something more than the part time systems that GM offers. GM vehicles also do not offer the differential locking feature and I do find that to be very useful in urban driving in deep snow or very slippery conditions. Know that you truly need and purchase accordingly.
With the Dynamax setup I'm assuming locking the differential is just 100% engaging the rear mutli plate clutch assembly , so power is split 50% between front and rear axles - nothing more than SW programming. Saying 100% power can be sent to the rear axle is somewhat dubious as that would only happen if both front wheels have no traction and I don't think the system is really designed/intended to support full power output to the rear axle.

GM is known for doing some things on the cheap, so I wonder if some of their AWD driveline components can't take distributed power output for an extended period which you can do with the Dynamax so long as you don't exceed the speed constraint, but not sure what Dynamax does if anything when in lock and the vehicle is doing a lot turning.
 

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well yeah, the SFS cost me 52 000$ CAD tax in with options, and the grand cherokee summit v8 would be more like 70 000$.

52K is already quite a lot of money IMO, so I can't afford a new GC. Had to debate between another 3 year old GC summit or a new SFS. The used GC would have been cheaper, but then you get a car with no warranty and expensive repairs coming...

So I got the SFS.
 

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DTech....GM doing things on the cheap? Say it isn't so! (Sarcasm).

The GM system can overheat and turn itself off, returning the vehicle to FWD mode until it cools enough to engage again. Really not designed for continuous use and under the circumstances I was discussing.....Extended roadways with very deep snow deserving of a 4WD system that can happen.

I don't recall seeing any such discussion in the Hyundai owner's manual so I assume it doesn't have that potential issue.
 

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Discussion Starter #24
So we just had some snow today. With stock tires, 4-wheel lock mode on, it just slowly and surely goes wherever I pointed it to without much drama. Tried turning off the 4-wheel lock mode, and it feels about the same. It's hard to tell when the rear wheels are working 'cause the engine note is exactly the same. Traction control did not really kick in much either.

The OE tires seem to be up for the job, but I drove extra slow and cautious today. The only drama was when I tried to push it a bit more and rear slid more than I expected on a sharp turn to powdery snow.

All in all it's nice to have AWD for the days like today. But if ice develops tomorrow...
 

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I do find / feel a difference in lock mode on low speed turns (Intersections) on very slippery surfaces. The vehicle does feel more sure footed. Seems to pull better in the direction of the turn rather than sliding a bit. Subjective opinion of course.....
 

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Honestly the more I test the lock mode, the less I find a difference. Feels like a useless button to me. awd engages almost instantly on snow, so having it engaged, or having it engage automatically in 100ms or less, makes no difference to me.... That's my feeling so far.

Maybe it's just to help sales, so they can advertise a "awd lock"? But in the real world, it makes no difference.
 

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Honestly the more I test the lock mode, the less I find a difference. Feels like a useless button to me. awd engages almost instantly on snow, so having it engaged, or having it engage automatically in 100ms or less, makes no difference to me.... That's my feeling so far.

Maybe it's just to help sales, so they can advertise a "awd lock"? But in the real world, it makes no difference.
Best to use it in certain low speed conditions where constant wheel slippage is a given - uneven dirt roads, mud, slush, heavy snow accumulation. If nothing else it's going to reduce a lot of wear on the rear multi clutch pack as I'm pretty sure that AWD lock in the Dynamax setup is nothing more than 100% engagement of the clutch pack.

I found it worked effectively in getting the vehicle moving from a stop in heavy snow accumulation - a little less wheel spin as lock mode should reduce the small amount of time the computer needs to figure out which wheel(s) to power - it does that when not in lock by engaging the rear clutch pack and applying braking to the appropriate wheel(s). So yes the marketing hype tells you it's milliseconds for the computer to react but applying the clutch pack and the wheel braking just isn:t nearly as fast.
 

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Aw Dtech...You beat me to it. Yes, less wear and tear on components for sure and I should have thought of that earlier. I see GM trucks left in Auto 4WD mode all summer and yes, it does cause unnecessary wear because it does keep a few extra parts rotating. GM Auto 4WD is for truly variable conditions only, not routine driving. 4Hi for conditions where the auto would be kicking on and off constantly, just like the Hyundai AWD system would be kicking on and off frequently. AWD lock "should" reduce wear on components if nothing more.

As for actual driving benefits.....Everyone perceives things differently.
 

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I know this is an old thread but I want to add my 2 cents. A couple of years ago I attempted to enter a wind swept driveway on the open prairies with my 2015 Santa Fe AWD. I had no idea how hard that thick crust was. Needless to say, I got stuck. I was very disappointed when I selected AWD Lock and only saw the front passenger and the rear driver wheels spinning. Only 2 wheels spinning! I was expecting more. In my mind "All Wheel Drive Lock" means something much more than just engaging both front and rear drive.
 

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what did expect AWD drive lock to do ? It doesn't do anything more than at low speeds provide power to both front and rear axles in a non switched mode.
 

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what did expect AWD drive lock to do ? It doesn't do anything more than at low speeds provide power to both front and rear axles in a non switched mode.
non switch mode? Maybe I was naïve. I was expecting ALL wheel drive lock to lock ALL the wheels, not just one in the front and one in the back.
 

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non switch mode? Maybe I was naïve. I was expecting ALL wheel drive lock to lock ALL the wheels, not just one in the front and one in the back.
the vehicle has open differentails on the front and rear axles - when I say non switched when you are not in lock mode AWD is switched on - engaging the rear only when a degree of wheel slippage is detected, Hyundai like most of today's AWD uses the abs system to brake the wheel that is slipping, thus putting power to the other wheel, but if none of your wheels are on a surface that provides traction - not a usual case but if it happens no system 4wd or awd is going to help you until a wheel gets traction. IMO Hyundai AWD works as it's designed to ,it has center lock but not locking on the axles - but most awd vehicles that aren't designed for off road usedon't.
 

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non switch mode? Maybe I was naïve. I was expecting ALL wheel drive lock to lock ALL the wheels, not just one in the front and one in the back.
you could lay down some major coin ($60k) for something like a Jeep Rubicon - electronic locking of the axles along center lock , electronic detachable sway bars and low range 4wd and so on - but if it had all season tires like most of our SFS the jeep might even had a difficult time in the terrain you describe - true off road capabilities include stuff like all terrain tires, high clearance, locking axles for independent power to each wheel, hi -lo range and so on. But all that stuff drives up cost - hence a lot of guys just use the type of AWD the Sante Fe has - the center locking diff feature is not that big of a deal.
 
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